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UCLA  DAILY  BRUIN 
LOS  ANGELES,  CALIFORNIA 


SPRING  1995 


APRIL  3,  1995 

TO 

JUNE  18.  1995 


MASTER  NEGATIVE 

#03796 


University  of  California,  Los  Angeles 


84thYear,  No.  126 
Circulation:  20,000 


Daily  Bruh 


Monday 
May  22,  1995 


Federal  cuts  will  cripple  UC,  regents  say 


C  'on^Tcss  accused 
oi  sacrificing  IJ(> 
education  for  deficit 


Rv  Phillip  Carter 

IJiiily  Br  uin  Senior  St  .it 


iIk-  ('( '  svskMii,  (ilticials  saul  But  Masscv    vhki'J  itu;  inn-! 

Masscy  saui  ih.il  Iccli'ial  luruK  i.(iiUL'in  over  cuts  lo  suniciii 

accoiinli.'i.l  lor  [lall  ot  Itic  [  (    Inul  tiiiaiKial  aul  ami  iCNcaitli  l'miii 

s^cl  lasl  \  r.ii,  urii'hirii'  in  a  I  S-t  <^  "I  lie   niusl   mm  icu  s   pn  il^i  i;  in 

hillion     This  iiioiH's   [ia\^  l«ii  OO  iii\ol\c^  cliiinna!  nni  <it  siinji/ni 

L.uls  tu  loVicrllic  li'dcr  al  tlcl  u  It       [icii^cnl  ol   l.'('  ic  mmi  >.  h ,  nmii.'  loan  iiUcicnI  suhMdic.  ihal  llic 

a  111  I  |>a\    toi  a  lax  ^  ul    Mnic  llian       ih.ui  hall  ot  sliulcnl   I  ma  lu  nil  aul  !  cdc  i  a  1   i'  o\  f  i  n  nir  n  l    p.i  \  >   ho 

S'l  In  II  n  111  car  iinir  kt'il  loi  car  I  h         ,t  rui   a  ho  u  I    ^  ■>    [H'  u  c  ii  l    i  >  t    i  he  \'.  hilr  slmk-iil\  aic  ^llil  in  -.i.  In  ^  i| 

i|nakr  nMu't  \>.  a^  1.111  Imin  iIk'  hint         niiiik'\  lo  i  im  itu-  I  (  '  >  ti\  c  ho^pi  MasM.-\    vsariicil     "Otlu-r   U'llin, 


the  hill  !hi\  week 

rhe  cut  turuis  had  already  heeii 
hiidueted  in  lor    I 'M^"^  h\   the  old 
|)einoei.|lK   (  On^^ress    lioue\ei 
Kepiihliiaii  ineiiiher's  inaile  the 


SAN  I  k  NNC   IS((  )         It  unK       I'ei 
n  11  ik  one  (iA\   toi   I  ( '  l'io\osI  ami 


I'lisMid  \   SI    hiMioii  ol   tin 


t.iK  Iioiis  im.  hide  the  el  iiniiiai  nni  ol 

I  he  ^.l^^  to  iese.in.h  i.  aiiie  iiij      I'radiiate  lellov.  ^hl[1s  .md  m  hoLn 


Ni-coiul    111    eoiiiinand     Wallet  pioinised    lunds    wioild    h.i\e  the  m.  le^K  es,  aits,  hntn. unties  and  sli  i  ps  .  pa  i  t  k  n  I  a  i  I  \    iho-,./   !.,| 

Masses   to  toieshadou   disaster  helped     hiiild     I    ('!   As     neu  almost  e\er\   other  area    \l.isse\  under  re[ire--enle(,l  minor  ilie- 

tiom  S\(>  hiliioii  letleial  |noL'rarn  Metlual  ('enter     ('oni'ress  also  ,nid  other  ottieials  .ittrihuled  this            ("urrentlv     students   air   noi 

^  ut  s  that  (  'on  t'  I  e  ss  passed  on  pas  seil  i.  ii  t  ^   in   I  i  na  ik  i  a  1   aid  to  the  end  o  I  the  ( 'old  War  and  the  i  Inir  I'ed  i  uteres!  on  then    loan  ■ 

ihuisda\     AnaKsts  [nedKl   that  leseaieh   and   \1eilieare   areas  lu'ed  to  tediue  teder.il   ri'seaii.h  uhile  the\   are  in    ^^.  hool     When 

I'lesideiit   Hill  (linton   uill   sit'ii  whiehelleU  rieaiK   eveiv   aiea  ol  spendiiiL'  at  eoidinid\  ailojited.  \1,rse\    sanllhi-  |iolk\ 


Ai  uild  ni.ike  the  a'-  erai'r     tU'.ti  M 
.  '  iUeL'e  drhl    'Jd  yri .  ,'u:  hn/t,,'' 
A  I    a    p;  '•  o     ^  t,u\  '-  <  r  ;>.,  '.     ,  ■ 
A.-ek      1    (    I     \   (    dam  -llo;    (    liarLj 
")  o  II  n  /      a  .  ,1    ill',;'''       i. '       .-.•'.. 
tequiie  a     imuilancoLi-   ,U'.!l.:   '^   i' 
t  !   I  ■  ^    111    til!    O I    M ; r    !  i 1 1  a  '   ■    ; .    '      i  . 

i'a[)s  jell  \y,   ilie  v  am    hm:'   ' 
Hnt   he  added  Iha'      \\:<  r 

he  so  i'.'eal  tluil  ;!   .v  lil  t-.i    !■■  ;  ■ 
'lie  I  I( '  Im  idee  ihr  •:M[ 

M  a  -    •■  \     -.    !  e  in  a  f  1- 
a  n  e  i  ^    i  <  ■  a^.  l  m   n  ^    t  r  .  ■  • 
I  reenl  --     v\  (m  .  -  aid  ;  hal  i    -^  .' :  ■' 
A  a  s  ab<  Nil   1 '  I  Ml  111   1  lu-    \  a,r  ;  , 

Soo  CUTS,  ;.!,•■    6 


High  hopes 


Regents  to 
choose  new 
UC  president 


UlUlcnit  K  1  ,IM'.      ll.iM  Hi 


( ^1  ^cK.\  I]'. 'I)  I 


Phillip  Carter 


11^   i,  ■--- 


!^' 


JUSTIN  WAMHf 

'ofor  tuftatrdy,  soriio  pooplo  woro  not  oiilo  t, .  on,, ,,  ,iii  tho  oil*",  ,it  I  CI  A's  Mardi  Gras  whic  h  w,js  hidrl  Fncjrjy, 
>oCim1,iv  -I'ld  SijikIov  on  tho  hit  rnituir  ,i!  F  lold 


'    :  .!  It.      ',  i.;  •  I 
o       ).  !  M,  :      ,   '      , 
.,  a  a        n;.  ,1     I 

!  '.r      i  ai.  1:      ■.    •   > 
;     ■  V     A  ,  i  i    hi  III-    ,i    ' 
•  aid     t   ii\L'eiio   \*.    !l  ,;.    ;  '    .■     ■ 

a-.|4n      a!i>.    >   flail       ",-      ■     /     • 

!      .  ■  a  0.  n  . .  M  ■  i  n  i  1 1 1 1  . 

I  ; , ,         e  a  K  t ;    A  a  ■•    ■  e      . ,     '  ',    a '  ■ 
>   M  I     i    (       I'  'e  ■  I  d  e  !■  '      lac     I ' 
'm  a  lit  erne  lit   in    I  an  i  1 1  \     '  ••<. 
.eii,    'tlev  ti>.r  (  ».  I     i. 
\  t   t  h  a  '    !  I  nil'     !  h  e   h,  >  o  >: 
il  '.  '■■  A  ,di     .iMl  V  !'l  di  r;  ^  It  ' '    ■    '. 


,l..la'v    1'     du 
liii'il\    t.a    I  id>ii, 


PRESIDENT,  :    n      8 


Inside  A&E 

Lollapalooza 
art 

Lollapaloo/as   "Mcaii 
Art"  shows  that  art  never 
has  to  be  elitist 
L()llapal()()/a  founder  FVrry 
larrcll  collaborated  with 
Santa  Monica  gallery  owner 
lulic  Rico  to  create  a  collec 
tion  of  1.  A   art 

See  page  16 

ASUCLA  board  to  pass  on  torch,  advice 


By  Patrick  Kerkstra 

Oriily  Brum  St. iff 

I  I  nil'  is  ahoii  t  to  I  un  out   toi 
ASl  '(  1  As  hoard  ot  dneetors 

Al  the  etui  ol  one  ol  the  most 
tmhiilent  ami  eontro\ersial  ve.irs 
111  the  assoeia 
lion's  liistory, 
this  board  has 
only  one 

ineeling  left 
to  reform  the 
organization 
as  much  as  it 
can. 

After  five 
years  of  poor 
financial  per 

formancc,  board  members  have 
become  concenied  that  the  asscKi 
ation  will  eventually  face  financial 
min. 

The  association  oversees  cam- 


pus eaterie--  .ind  sign's    (  )thei  sci 
\  u  e  s  .sn  [i|"ioi  ted  h\     \  S  I   (  '  I   .\ 
iiK  hide  siudeiil  media  ,iiid  foverri 
menis    II  the  or^ain/ation  uere  to 
eolhipise,  the  tuliire  ot  these  set 
\  K  I's  vuiulii  be  uneerl.nn 

Ihal  threat  \\as  sullieieni  to 
convince  this  vear's  boaul  to  te.ir 
down  many  of  the  association's 
long  entrenched  officials  and  poll 
cies  Most  notahlv.  it  removetl 
Jason  Reed,  who  ser\ed  as 
ASCCLA's  executive  ilirector  U\\ 
14  years. 

However,  in  the  briet  period  left 
before  its  service  ends,  the  best 
the  board  can  do  is  present  incom- 
ing members  with  instructions  for 
a  shiny  new  ASUCLA,  assembly 
required 

The  pieces  arc  there,  and  the 
association  hopes  the  Alpha 
Partner  turnaround  consultants 
have  the  expertise  to  help  put  the 


assoeiatH  ui  toi'ethei  aeain 

H  lit  the  na  L'  L'  my  ipie  si  i ,  mi  i  -• 
v\  hetlu't  or  not  ru'xl  \  imi  s  I<i  mi  d 
v>,ill  sliare  the  i,oinmon  vision  tin-. 
one  <V>^\ 

The  chancellor  h.is 
iiltiiiKirc  authority  o\cr 
the  association,  anJ  he 

unist  apprt)ve  any 
const  it ntional  chan^'es. 

The  success  of  the  Students 
First  slate  m  elections  suggests 
next  year's  undergraduate  board 
representatives  may  have  a  differ- 
ent agenda  than  this  years  board 
many  of  whom  were  appointees  of 
current  undergraduate  President 
Rob  Cirecnhaigh  John  Shapley's 
victory  in  the  Ciraduate  Students' 


\  ^so^,  lat  loll  pi  (■  Nidenl  la  -  eit  .  ',!'  ' 
I  on  Id   mean  that  >  ii  i  i  en'   !^  at  i 
.  hall.   1  im  Heasle\    m,i\   no!  i ,  i,  '  • 
ne\l  \eai 

(  'tMisei.juent  1\ .  hoaiil  men'tua 
.ire  seramhlniL'  to  ilralt  thanee- 
the  eotistitution  and  h\laus.  ettei 
ing  them  ad\iee  from  a  ucll  sea 
soiieii  and  mtormed  bo.iivl  ot 
d'rcctors 

"I'hc  ulea  is  to  gi\c  next  ve.ii's 
board  an  ide.i  ol  what  we,  as  a  uni 
lied  board,  think  the  .issoci.ition 
needs  to  do  next  year."  said  gradu 
ate  board  member  Karol  Dean 

One  publicly  silent  but  impor 
tant  figure  in  the  debate  over  the 
board's  role  is  Chancellor  Charles 
Young  1  he  chancellor  has  ulti- 
mate authority  over  the  associa 
tion,  and  he  must  approve  any 
constitutional  changes    He  has 

See  ASUCLA,  page  9 


*T-  ^* 


-«     '     ♦  '        ■■■'  •     '  »•  •-•       '  ' 


tWMMC.'ir *««  -»  * 


'i^r  ^7;^"'"'^'^/ 


2       Monday,  May  22, 199S 


Daily  druin 


\Nhars  Brewin'This  Week 


Community  Service  Commission 

AppliLalvixis  torCommumly  Sc/vicc 
(  uiiimissioii  I9*^S  96  Stall  now 
av.iilahk-,  due  M.iy  21 
KiTcklK.tt  4()X 
S .'  s  2  u  ^ 

Meals  on  Wheels 

\.i  ilnnlfcf  .  iitj'ciill)  in.T(J(,-(l  lo  (Iclivci 
Mic;il  :  l(  I  (he  ill.  i-|ilcil\  ,'iii(l  oltict 
liiHiiet)(»iiii(l  people  111  ific  S.inla  Monu  a 
.111(1  Malil)ii  .lie. I , 

(   ,ill  lu.uin.i  V.I  ,(jiie/  .11    V}\  7SS)S  loi 
iiKife  iiilorinalKiii 


1  p.m.  —  3  p.m. 


Department  of  Biostatistics 

I  I'-e    ,l.ili  ,IK  ,i|  eonsilltlll^' 
l':ihlK    lle.illli  .Al    2  V7 


Today 


12:10  p.m. 


University  CattiQttt^fcenter 

VV'-ek  l\   lii.r,  . 
■\    (■.•■liii.iii    ^"i  <') 
\  I  .1  /  I  ill  Wc'llie    1 1,1  , 
.Mjy,    ',01  S 


4  p.m. 


Vietnamese  Language  &  Culture  (Sinti 
Hoat  Que  Huong) 

S'-'  I  )ii(l  riei  lion  ineriinr      r\i■^  i|i  in  p  )f 
[!■■.'.   np.-fiMI)'  ,  111  \\\  (      \')')^   ')',   ,l,ill 

\    ^  'Till, in   ''"'  '.') 

:'n  2/7^ 


5  p.m. 


Coptic  Club 


,[re,i 


h-i  ^^l,'^  '.'.im 


Intern^itional  Students  Association 


":       '    :!  ! 


5:30  p.m. 


esbian  Ra^/(?A[  A 


H,'i!t      i)'i 


6  p.m. 


■|.  I  III  ir 


Asian  Pacilic  Coalition 

i'   :M    lli'-i-lin;'        •■■.  'M   ,'  iir 

<  lll,llt..-ll  '.'  ■ 
-    ■■     i  ■-  i 

Ra/a  Graduation 

'  r    :r    I  .ll    lll'-i-lllll' 

'    imi[.Im-||   I  101 
■HO  ssw 


7  p.m. 


UCLA  Extension  "Screenwriters  on 
Screenwriting  " 

>;■     l-;v  Strick,  "Woll        C.ipe  (  e,ir 

\i,ii  linoplidbni.       I  rue  Helievci 
MS   UKK).A 

(   ',   >    %  U) 


8  p.m. 


Kerckhotf  Coffeetiouse  Jaz7  Series 

n..  i),iM  i'..iii<i 

K.ri.  t  [|(,||  (  (lite, -Ik, I)  ,(■ 

■",2'.  0S04 


9  p.m. 


Hillel  Students  Association 

I   r.ieji  (j.ifK  m^ 

''00  llil).Mr(l  Ave 

<"  o  I    '?>S  >.'encra!,  %-\  iiiideni,  Iree  lor 

III  .1  liniefs 

,'OX    U)K1 


Tuesday 


Noon 


Baha'l  Club 

General  meeting 
Ackerman  2410 
47y-32(X) 


12:15  p.m. 


University  Catholic  Center 

('alfiolic  rosary  j/roup 
Ackerman  3516 
Also  on  Thursday 
2()H -.'^(JI.S 


4:15  p.m. 


College  of  Letters  &  Science  Academic 
Support  Workshops 

Sub)ecl  lo  disriiissal  j-Toup    , 
( inllin  f 'onimons  20  ^ 

^2^  ons 


5  p.m. 


Chinese  Student  Association 

fiener.il  iiicelm^'      eleelKtii debate 

I  AI  (  '  I'rcss  koorn 

44^9790 


5:45  p.m. 


Hillel  Students  Association 

Dorm  Network 

lledrick  l''rivate  Diruri).'  Room 

2()H   ^OXi 


6  p.m. 


African  Education  Project 

Old  Annual  \:\  Hay  Malik  Id  Shaha// 
'  M.ileolfii  X  )  (  Ommcmoration 
Streni^'lh  I  liroii).d)  I  Inity 
l^)lte  I2(K) 

:-..'-i  0/  14 

Nikkei  Student  Union 

''  i'-|M-[,|J    [lierlHIl' 

K.lh  ,r.    SI 

'-:  1  loso 


6:30  p.m. 


The  Bodhi  Tree  Annex 

I  III-   'siti   I    ,  VV',i\  Wot  k  ,lio[)  ' 
-,  '-.'   Mr|r<,,r  A'.e      We-.l   Hollw'.ood 
(  <>   I    \  U.O  loi    I  2  ^e^Mol|s 


7  p.m. 


UCLA  Circle  K  Community  Service  Club 

(  leinT.il  iiK'elnijJ 
Al  keriii.in  24  I  2 
20X  2490 


7:30  p.m. 


Melnitz  Movies 

I  ree  s(  reernn^'  and  discussion  of  "Miles 
ot  Smiles,  Ye.irs  ol  Slruj:?gle"  and 

Nothing'  Hut  a  Man" 
Melnil/  I  he. Iter 

'y.js  2  us 
Women  For: 

lu\ti(eot  ln|iisli(.e    I  )oes  llie  Jury 
System  Worl-  '" 
I  1900  Sunset  HKd 
Ice    S"- 

0S7  741  I 


8  p.m. 


Enigma  (UCLA  Science  Fiction  & 
Fantasy  Club) 

( (cneral  meeting 
Ac  kerman  2412 
794  5459 


Wednesday 


Chinese  Student  Association 

Orricers/Slaff  election 
Firuin  Walk 
Also  on  Jhursday 
470  ^500 


10  a.m.  -  2  p.m. 


Walking  Theatre  Group 

Transpersonal  &  Traditional  Theatre 

Workshop 

W(K)den-0  Theatre.  2207  Federal  Ave. 

Cost:  $25  a  month,  free  audits 

395-4364 


11  a.m. 


Pi  Kappa  Phi 

Beeperball     ,sgurts  activity  designed  to 
raise  handicapped  awareness 
IM  Field 
794-4156 


Noon 


AHUSA  (Art  History  Undergraduate 
Students'  Association) 

Weekly  meeting 
Dickson  4273 
207  IIK4 

Community  Service  Commission 

liuild  Up  LA  recruitment  meeting 

Moore  |(K)H 

H2.5-2333 

Lesbian,  Gay,  Bisexual  Studies 

LCJBS  firown  Bag  Lunch 
Haines  304 

825-3722 


2  p.m. 


Campus  Events  Commission 

Women  in  Hollywood  Forum;  Annette 

Bening,  Lili  Zanuck,  Robin  Swicor  and 

iMimi  Polk 

Ackerman  Orand  Ballroom 

H25-6223 


5:30  p.m. 


Jewish  Federation  Council 

■'Stay  Alive  in  '95;  The  State  ol 

Residential  Real  f-state" 

12445  Mountamgate  Dr.,  Los  Angeles 

Cost:  S2() 

H52-77fX) 


6  p.m. 


Buddhist  Student  Association 

A  hay  in  the  Life  ol  a  lapanese 
I'lirehind  Person"  by  Reverend  lu)ii 
MS  6201 

Xn  H54^ 


6:30  p.m. 


UCLA  Pre-Optometry  Society 

Optometry  and  Opthalmology 
Radical  Keratolomies"  by  fxlward 
Manche,  ()  I) 
Cieology  6704 
208-7848 


7  p.m. 


Bruin  Victory  Fellowship 

Living  the  Life  of  Victory 
Kinsey  169 

College  of  Letters  &  Science  Academic 
Support  Worltshops 

fakmg  advantage  of  professor  and  lA 

office  hours 

f  inffin  Commons  203 

825-9315 


7:30  p.m. 


City  of  Los  Angeles  Cultural  Affairs 
Department 

"[  he  Beautiful  Worlds  of  Frank  Lloyd 

Wright  and  Buckminstcr  Fuller:  A 

discussion  of  areas  of  agreement  and 

disagreement  between  two  rnen  of 

genius"  by  (ieorgc  Potter 

48(K)  Hollyw<Kxl  BTvd..  Los  Angeles 

(213)485-4581 

Melnitz  Movies 

I  ree  screening  of  'The  Postman" 
Melnit/  Theater 

825-2.345 


8  p.m. 


Fear  of  Success  Anonymous 

Goal  achievement  workshop 
5521  Grosvenor  Blvd. 
Fee:  $2  suggested  donation 
559-8385 


Thursday 


1:15  p.m. 


John  Paul  II  Society 

Dr.  D.  Alan  Shewmon  on  "The  CJospel 
of  Life" 

Ackerman  2408 
209-9116 


2  p.m. 


SCR  43  Latino  Research  Program 

Terri  de  la  Pena,  writer  and  novelist 

Haines  152 

825-2365 


7  p.m. 


Lesbian,  Gay,  Bisexual  Rap 

Dorm  Rap 

Call  Charles  at  206-3628  for  more 

information 

UCLA  at  the  Armand  Hammer  Museum 
of  Art  &  Cultural  Center 

Lyle  Ashton  Harris  speaks  on  his  work 

10899  Wilshire  Blvd. 

443-7000 

UCLA  Chicano/Latino  Film  and 
Television  Association 

"New  Visions/New  Voices:  Nuevas 
Visiones/Nuevas  Voces" 
Melnitz  Theater 
280-0259 


Friday 


1  p.m. 


UCLA  Muslim  Union 

Iridyy  Juma  Prayers 
Ackerman  3530 
515  5291 


3  p.m. 


Chinese  Christian  Fellowship 

Bible  study 
Ackerman  35 1 7 
794-5337 


5  p.m. 


Hwa  Rang  Do 

Martial  art  class 

Wooden  Center  Blue  Room 

824-5863 


■^rr^^ 


gp^ 


6  p.m. 


Chinese  Student  Association 

Banquet  and  dance 

New  Otani  Hotel 

Cost:  Banquet  and  dance  -  $35  general, 

$30  member,  $15  for  dance  only 

470-3566 


7  p.m. 


Grace  on  Campus 

Fellowship  and  weekly  meeting 

MS4000A 

208-8384 

Maoist  internationalist  Movement 
(MIM) 

Speaker  and  films  on  the  National 

Democratic  Movement  of  the 

Philippines 

e-mail:  mim4@nyxfer.blythe.org 

If  you  would  like  an  event  listdd  in  this 
section,  please  fill  out  a  listing  request 
form  in  225  Kerckhoff  by  2  p.m.  the 
day  before  publication.  Tlie  deadline 
for  listings  to  appear  in  Monday's  paper 
is  2  p.m.  Thursday  Please  address 
questions  to  Listings  Editor  Ayako 
Hagihara  at  206-0904. 


Dally  Bruin 


JUSTIN  WARReN/t>a«ly  Bruin 

Pliillp  Hllmore  Crabbe  III,  a  fourth-year  anthropology  student,  presents  his  honors  thesis  to  his  research  program  class.  The 
anthropology  (department  may  eliminate  the  program  due  to  budget  cuts. 

Anthropology  honors  program  in 


Funding  crisis  threatens 
undergraduate  research 
and  unique  opportunity 


By  Nancy  Hsu 

Daily  Bruin  Senior  Staff 

Philip  Fillmore  Crabbe  III  spent  last  sum- 
mer lounging  by  a  public  pool  in  Oakland, 
chatting  to  girls  and  sunbatliing. 

"This  is  where  most  of  the  Live  Oak  pool 
community  lives,"  Crabbe  said,  pointing  at  a 
slide  of  run-down  apartment  complexes  dur- 
ing 1lis  research  project  presentation  Friday. 


"Many  children  complain  of  unhappiness 
and  instability  at  home.  To  the  kids,  the  pool 
is  like  a  safe  oasis." 

Crabbe's  research  project,  "Live  Oak 
Pool:  A  case  study  approach  examining Ihe 
fit  of  public  programs  and  community 
needs,"  was  one  of  15  presentations  made 
last  week  by  undergraduates  in  the  anthro- 
pology honors  program  -  one  of  several  pro- 
grams  across  the  university  that 
administrators  are  trying  to  find  resources  to 
keep  alive. 

Modeled  after  the- undergraduate  experi- 
ence at  Harvard  University,  the  honors 
research  program  was  designed  eight  years 
ago  to  offer  advanced  undergraduates  a  long- 
term  research  experience  under  close  faculty 


supervision. 

Undergraduates  develop,  conduct  and  pre- 
sent their  research  on  topics  ranging  from 
labor-organizing  strategies  among  Asian 
immigrant  workers  to  middle-class  sut)ur- 
bia'S  fascination  with  their  lawns. 

Students  take  two  courses  on  preparing  a 
proposal  and  conducting  research  before  the 
summer.  During  the  summer,  they  do  their 
field  work.  In  the  fall  and  winter,  they  ana- 
lyze their  data  and  write  up  a  thesis. 

University  administrators  say  the  program 
is  the  only  one  of  its  kind,  allowing  under- 
graduates to  conduct  research'and  present 
their  findings  in  an  open  foriim. 

SftP  WBARCiU>age  JiL 


MoiMtay«May22,4M6      3 

BG8A 

movos, 
prepares 
for  '95-'96 

Group  aims  to 
educate  grads  on 
affirmative  action 


By  Betty  Song 

Daily  Bruin  Staff 

« 

J'he  history  of  the  Black 
Graduate  Students  Association 
(BGSA)  can  be  traced  back  to  a 
constitution  dated  I97L  Since  that 
time,  it's  gone  through  several 
office  locattotw  and  a  name  i 
before  finding  a  home  at  the 
Graduate  Students  Association 
(GSA)  office  earlier  this  month. 

Originally  formed  as  the  BGSA, 
the  group  has  previously  been 
known  as  the  Association  of 
Graduate  Students  of  African 
Descent  until  members  changed  the 
.name  back  last  year  to  be  more 
inclusive  of  various  black  students, 
said  past  co-president  Heather 
Parker. 

When  officers  such  as  Parker  left 
to  concentrate  on  their  studies,  the 
organization  remained  inacUve 
until  African  area  studies  students 
L>ezlee  Cox  and  John  Shapley,  and 
history  student  Dai{ia  Ramey  met 
winter  quarter  to  revive  the  group. 
The  need  to  provide  a  social  net- 
work for  African  American  gradu- 
ate students  prompted  their  efforts. 

"Some  people  are  kind  of  isolat- 
ed in  their  departments  and  don't 
know  other  African  Americans  on 
campus."  «>aid  Cox,  BGSA  presi- 
dent. Such-an  organization  could 
serve  to  show  students  that  any 
issues  in  their  departments  may  be 
affecting  other  students  as  well,  she 
added. 

The  three  students  m^t  informal- 
ly'before  completing  a  maijing 
ba.sed  on  an  official  list  of  African 
American  graduate  students.  After 
holding  officer  elections  and  a  few 
meetings.  Cox  met  with  graduate 
student  President  Tim  Beasley  and 
teamed  that  according  to  the  gradu- 
ate government's  constitution,  ccr- 


See  49tA,  page  11 


Women  take  charge  of  finances 


Common  cents 


Money  managing 
workshop  fosters 
independence 

By  Maria  Baarens 

Johari  Brown  never  thought 
that  by  coming  to  Los  Angeles  she 
would  end  up  having  seven  credit 
cards  with  debts  she  couldn't  pay 

off.,. 

Last  year 
Brown  left 
her  home  in 
Maryland  and 
spent  her 
freshman  year 
at  UCLA 
thinking  that 
because  she. 
was  far  away 
from  her  par- — '""  ""'^"■"^'^- — — 
ents  the  could  do  whatever  the 
wanted. 

"I  had  problem!  (paying)  more 
than  the  minimum  payment  on  my 
credit  card/*  said  Brown,  now  a 


second-year  women  studies  stu^ 
dent.  "And  I  was  in  an  apartment  I 
couldn't  afford." 

As  the  year  progressed,  Brown 
realized  that  she  was  in  trouble  , 
and  decided  to  learn  more  about 
finances  by  conducting  extensive 
research  on  money  management 
and  investment. 

Today,  women  need  to  educate 
themselves  on  financial  matters 
more  than  ever.  Brown  said.  With 
more  women  independently  pro- 
viding for  their  education  and  oth- 
ers finding  themselves  in  charge 
of  large  sums  of  money,  it  is  espe- 
cially important  for  women  to 
look  ahead  and  take  charge  of 
their  financial  future,  she  added. 

"Most  people  I  know  d6n*t 
save,  and  until  today  I  didn't  know 
that  you  had  to,"  Brown  said. 

Brown  went  to  a  workshop 
alnnit  financial  independence  for 


Resource  Center  at  UCLA. 
Catering  to  the  need  for  financial 
edutation,  the  workshop  showed 
audience  members  what  they  .. 
could  do  with  their  money  artd~^ 


explai)led  the  importance  of  start- 
ing an  investment  plan. 

The  investment  company  Dean 
Witter  Reynolds  Inc.  hosted  the 
workshop  with  two  facilitators, 
Tracy  Bornstein  and  Sharon 
Jones,  who  explained  that  today, 
women  have  to  be  sophisticated 
and  knowledgeable  enough  so  that 
no  one  can  take  advantage  of 
them. 

Through  use  of  statistical  data, 
graphs  and  specific  examples, 
they  pointed  out  the  increased 
power  of  women  in  society  and 
the  workplace  over  the  past  10 
years.  They  also  noted  that  more 
and  more  women  will  be  left 
alone  to  handle  their  own  fin^ces 
in  the  future  -  making  it  important 
for  women  to  get  involved  in 
money  management,  Bornstein 
said. 

Patima  Ford,  program  coordi- 
^natorjff JheJHomen*! 
that  there  was  a  perception  that 
men  weie  the  only  bread  winners. 

"Now  we  know  that  women 


•oma  of  ttia  ftatifttoa  whioh  ahow  why  mora  Amartoan 
ohooalng  to  taka  oharga  of  thair  own  flnancaa. 


jf 


aatUMapteu 


•  Wonnen  comprise: 

-  45  percent  of  the  workforce 

r  41  percent  of  people  with  rTX)re  than  $500,00  (1 986) 
•  35  percent  of  the  country's  shareholders 

-  30  percent  of  the  natton's  sole  proprietors  (1987) 

•  Nine  out  of  10  wonf)en  will  take  charge  of  their  own 
finances  at  some  point  during  their  lives 

•  More  than  one-third  of  all  women  will  be  divorced 

•  K/k>re  than  60  percent  of  working  wonwn  do  not  have 
penak>n  plana 

•  Wh^es  outlive  their  husbands  by  about  six  years 

•  48  percent  of  all  women  become  widowed 

tpaicaht  of  retired  women  do  fKn  receive  pension 
beneflti 


wfa 


See 


page  11 


\,_i-_^ji%ii;-, 


yiiittj.._*^«;. 


4       Monday,  May  22, 1995 


Daily  Bruin  News 


Ebola  quarantine 
faces  possible  leak 

KINSHASA,  Zaire  —  People  are  brib- 
ing their  way  past  roadblocks  set  up  to 
contain  the  deadly  Ebola  virus,  and 
experts  fear  new  outbreaks  among  the 
thousands  camped  out  at  the  barriers. 

Some  3,000  people  have  been  waiting 
at  one  roadblock  for  days  with  little 
food  or  water,  said  Dr.  Jean-Jacques 
Muyembe  Tamfum,  a  virus  expert  who 
helped  identify  Ebola  in  the  1970s. 

Muyembe,  a  prrtfessar  at  Kinshasa 


Pope  apologizes 
for  Catholic  crimes 

OLOMOUC.  Czech  Republic  —  Visiting 
a  land  bloodied  for  centuries  by  religious 
wars.  Pope  John  PaulJI  asked  forgive- 
ness Sunday  for  crimes  committed  by 
Catholics  against  other  Chn'stians. 

The  pope  also  pledged  to  forgive  those 
who  caused  Catholics  to  suffer. 

The  statements  came  on  a  day  the 
pope  canonized  a  Catholic  priest  mar- 
tyred in  1620  during  the  Connter- 
ReformatioQ. — ^ 


University,  last  week  criticized  the 
attempt  to  quarantine  Kikwit.  Instead, 
he  said  that  more  doctors  and  more 
equipment  should  be  sent  tQ  the  city  of 
600,000. 

Rushdie  appears  on 
'Letterman'  show^^ 

LONDON  —  Novelist  Salmari  Rushdie, 
who  has  lived  in  hiding  under  a  death 
threat  since  1989,  made  a  surprise 
appearance  on  Friday's  "Late  Show 
with  David  Letterman." 

Rushdie,  introduced  by  Lettermanas 
"a  man  who  doesn't  gel  out  very  often." 
delivered  the  evening's  Top  10  List 
('Top  10  Bobby  Pet  Peeves").  The  pro- 
gram, taped  earlier  Friday,  was  the  last 
of  a  weeklong  series  from  London.  The 
CBS  show  is  based  in  Manhattan. 

After  handing  over  the  list,  Rushdie 
joked  to  Letterman,  "If  you  need  me, 
I'll  be  at  the  London  Plaza  Hotel." 
»  His  appearance  became  a  running 
joke. 

"He  just  gets  restless  in  his  room  and 
decides  to  be  on  a  TV  show,"  cracked 
Letterman. 


"Today  I,  the  pope  of  the  Church  pf 
Rome,  in  the  name  of  all  Catholics,  ask 
forgiveness  for  the  wrongs  inflicted  on 
non-Catholics  during  the  turbulent  histo- 
ry of  these  peoples,"  Pope  John  Paul  said. 

Massacre  blamed 
on  Rwandaii^oops" 

KIGALI,  Rwanda  —  Last  month's  mas- 
sacre of  2,000  Hutu  refugees  by  Tutsi- 
led  troops  was  not  deliberate,  but  could 
have  been  avoided,  says  the  multina- 
tional commission  investigating  the 
shootings. 

In  a  report  last  week,  the  commission 
also  said  some  of  the  refugees  were 
killed  by  "elements  among  themselves," 
a  reference  to  Hutu  extremists  loyal  to 
Rwanda's  ousted  government. 

Most  of  the  deaths  occurred  April  22 
when  Rwanda's  new  Tutsi  leaders  sent 
troops  to  close  camps  in  the  southwest 
that  had  been  home  to  as  many  as 
150,000  people. 

The  government  contends  some  of 
the  refugees  were  Hutu  extremists  try- 
ing to  destabilize  the  country  in  hopes 
of  regaining  power. 


Thompson  refuses 
to  aid  Wilson's  run 

GREEN  BAY.  Wis.  —  Gov.  Tommy 
Thompson  rejected  an  offer  Saturday  to 
play  a  national  role  in  California  Gov. 
Pete  Wilson's  run  for  president  so  he 
could  keep  his  own  options  open,  a 
Wilson  aide  said. 

It  was  an  indication  of  Thompson's 
thoughts  about  seeking  a  national  office 
himself,  having  said  a  governor  should  be 
on  the  party's  presidential  ticket  in  19%. 
-^Wilson  had  breakfast  with  Thompsoh 
at  the  governor's  mansion  in  Madison 
when  Wilson  made  the  offer,  Wilson 
campaign  manager  Craig  Fuller  said  in  an 
interview  during  the  weekend  Republican 
Midwest  Leadership  Conference. 

Microsoft  and  Intuit 


call  off  liiefg&r 

SEATTLE  —  Microsoft  Corp.  called  off 
its  proposed  merger  with  Intuit  Inc.  on 
Saturday  rather  than  endure  months  of 
antitrust  litigation  with  the  Justice 
Department. 

The  government  sued  last  month  to 
block  Microsoft's  $2  billion  purchase  of 
Intuit,  maker  of  the  popular  Quicken  per- 
sonal finance  program.  The  deal 
announced  seven  months  ago  would  have 
been  the  biggest  software  merger  ever. 

"It's  unfortunate  that  after  such  a  broad 
government  review  the  merger  faced 
additional  months  of  uncertainty  in  the 
courts,"^said  Microsoft  Chairman  Bill 
Gates.  "This  is  a  fast-paced  industry 
experiencing  lots  of  change.  Progress 
toward  realizing  our  goals  could  not  wait 
until  the  government's  lawsuit  was 
resolved." 


Police  make  arrest 
in  CityWallc 

A  woman  found  on  the  freeway  with 
back  and  stomach  stab  wounds  was 
arrested  for  investigation  of  murder  in  the 
case  of  two  women  who  were  slashed  to 
death  in  a  Universal  CityWalk  parking 
garage. 

Donna  Lee,  44,  was  taken  into  cus- 
tody Friday  as  she  was  released  from  a 
Panorama  City  hospital.  Her  lover's 
mother  and  ex-girlfriend  were  found 
dead  last  Sunday. 

Officials  said  they  were  still  looking 
into  motives  for  the  slayings  and  want 
to  talk  to  witnesses  who  may  have  seen 
Lee  or  her  red,  1992  Chevy  Beretta  near 
the  crime  scene. 

Judge  grants  slum 
lawsuit  settlement 

On  Friday,  a  judge  approved  a  settle- 
ment in  a  lawsuit  which  accused 
Highland  Federal  Bank  in  addition  to 
more  than  100  co-defendants  of  main- 
taining slum  conditions  at  rat-infested 
buildings. 

The  city  and  the  700  to  800  tenants  of 
1 1  apartment  buildings  will  be  paid  $3.2 
million.  Tenants,  on  average,  will 
receive  $2,000  to  $3,000. 

The  amount  includes  awards  from 
two  prior  partial  settlements  and  was 
assessed  against  Highland  Federal  and 
136  individuals  and  companies,  includ- 
ing brokers  and  lenders. 

In  a  statement,  the  Highland  Park- 
based  bank  denied  "any  responsibility 
as  the  lender"  for  the  buildings. 


Compiled  by  Daily  Bruin  wire  services 


^^1t 


Annette  Bening 

Oscar  nominated  actress  for 
The  Griflers,  star  of  Bugsy, 
Love  Affair,  Regarding 
Henry,  Guilty  By 
Suspicion,  Valmont,  and 
upcoming  The  American 
President 


Mimi  Polk  Gitlin 

Producer  for  Thelma  &  Louise,  The 

Browning  Version,  and  the 

upcoming  White  Squall, 

production  associate  for  Black  Rain 


Robin  Swicord 

Writer  of  Little  Women, 
Perez  Family,  Shag,  and 
upcoming  Matilda 


I    Christine  Lahti 

Q&car  nominated  actess  for  Swing 

Shift,  star  of  Running  on  Empty, 

The  Doctor,  Gross  Anatomy, 

Leaving  Normal,  Hideaway. 


Lili  Fini  Zanuck 

CXscar  winiiiiii;  producer  of 
Driving  Miss  Daisy,  director 
o\  Rush,  producer  o\  Cocoon, 
Rich  in  Love,  M\d  upcoming 
films,  Mulholland  Falls  and 
Wild  Bill. 

moderator 

Denise  Mann 

Vice  Chair  of  UCLA 
Department  of  Film  and 
Tele\  ision.  Independent 

Producers  Program 


2  fi  d   a  fi  n 


co-sponsored  by 

Women's  Resource 

Center 


FRTE  -  NO  TICKET  REQTIIR 
ACKERMAN  GRAND  BALLROOM 
WEDNESDAY,  MAY  24   2:00-3:30PM 


pud  fo,  b, 


Dally  Bruin  News 


Monday,  May  22, 1995       5 


V 


Spend  your  summer  shrewdly. 

It's  easy  to  figure  out  why  SMC's 
Summer  Sessions  are  the  wise  buy 


Average  Summer  Course  Cost 

use  $2,?}20 

UCLA  575 

CSUN         —  ^82 

SMC :...  56* 


Santa 

MOMCA 
CDI^E 


1900  Pico  Boulevard 
Santa  Monica,  CA  90405-i628 


Best  in  the 

West(side) 

SMC  prides 
itself  on  small 
classes,  a  giltcd 
fatuity  and  a  large  array 
of  student  support  services.  Free  Park 
&  Ride  Shuttle  to  your  classes  And 
the  campus  is  convenient  to  world- 
famous  beaches    . 

"No.  1  in  transfers  to 
UCLA  and  USC." 

;■• 
Come  m  atui  tij^f^ly  loiitiy 


Office  hours : 

8  a.m.  ~  8  p.m.   Mon.  ~  Thurs 
8  a.m.  ~  4  p  m     Pri. 


*Calif  resident,  urrdcrKraduaic  Hijihcr  for  4-yMr  decree  holder  and  nonresident 


Phone:   310  452-S380 


6      Monday,  May  22, 1995 


Daily  Bruin  Ne%V8 


CUTS 


From  page  1 

educational  system  in  the  name  of 
reducing  the  federal  deficit. 

"A  20  percent  increase  in  debt 
load  is  a  major  increase  "  said  Lt. 
Gov.  Gray  Davis,  an  outspoken 
opponent  of  fee  hikes  at  prievious 
meetings.  "It  will  price  students 
out  of  an  education  and  8rive 
them  out  of  school  -  that's  self- 
defeating." 

After  hearing  of  the  situation  in 
Washington,  several  members  of 


the  mostly  Republican  board  criti- 
cized their  own  lack  of  lobbying 
efforts  in  the  nation's  capital. 

"i  wonder  if  we  as  a  board  have 
been  giving  enough  attention  to 
federal  matters,"  Regent  Ward 
Connerly  said.  "Maybe  we  could 
do  more  to  let  our  delegates  (in 
Congress)  know  how  important 
the  UC  is." 

Speaking  just  after  Connerly, 
Regent  William  Bagley  said  that 
some  of  the  regents  and  upper- 
level  UC  administrators  ought  to 
use  their  personal  connections  in 
Congress  to  work  harder  for  the 


UC  system. 

"Our  great  friend  -  or  rather 
Chuck  Young's  good  friend  - 
Congressman  Jerry  Lewis,  R- 
Calif.,  is  chair  of  the  appropria- 
tions subcommittee  for  HUD 
(Housing  and  Urban 
Development)  and  other  educa- 
tion-related areas,"  said  Bagley, 
who  added  that  he'll  bring  up 
these  cuts  with  him  as  soon  as 
possible; 

Across  the  country  in 
Washington,  these  cuts  marched 
closer  and  closer  to  reality  on 
Friday  as  the  House  passed  the 


final  version  of  the  $16  billion 
"rescission"  bill.  Both 
Democratic  and  Republican'  lead- 
ers agreed  that  passage  in  the 
Senate  was  virtually  assured, 
which  woiUd  send  the  bill  to 
President  Clinton's  desk  some 
time  next  week. 

Clinton  previously  threatened 
to  veto  this  bill,  but  backed  down 
after  House  Speaker  Newt 
Gingrich,  R-Ga.,  threatened  to 
block  funds  for  Oklahoma  City 
bombing  relieT  and  building  pro- 
jects coming  out  of  the  1993 
Northridge  earthquake. 


Correction 


The  Wednesday  article, 
"Rape  reports  on  campus  mis- 
leadingly  low,"  contained  an 
uiKlear  quote.  The  employees 
of  the  Women's  Resource 
Center  encourage  women  to 
make  their  own  decisions  and 
follow  whatever  actions  they 
feel  necessary  after  alleged 
nqjes  -  which  may  or  may  not 
include  legal  recourse. 


SPEND  THIS  SUMMER  AT 


Rio  Hondo  College,  That  Is 


Classes  Begin:  Monday,  June  19, 1995 
Classes  End:  Friday,  July  28, 1995  ^^, 


>3v^ 


4  ^--     i'^ 


SUMMER  199S 

What's  In  It  For  YOU! 

•  Complete  transferable  units 
in  Six  weeks 

•  Pay  ONLY  $13.00  per  unit 

•  Save  money  this  summer 

•  Freeway  Close:  junction  of 
60  and  605  freeways 


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Daily  Bruin  News 


Monday,  May  22, 1995       7 


HNAl  AVERAGE  ISAT  SCORES 


157 


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LAW  SCHOOLS 

PREFER  HIGHER 

LSAT  SCORES 


T/if  Princeton  Review  is  not  affiliated  with  Princeton  University  or  the  College  Soard. 

The  Princeton  Review  and  Kaplan  scores  are  based  on  separate  Deloitte  and  louche 

and  Price  Waterhouse  studies.  National  averages  courtesy  oflSAC. 


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Give  us  a  call  if  you'd  like  your 
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THE 

PRINCETON 

REVIEW 

(800)  2-REVIEW 
info@review.com 


8      Monday,  May  22, 1995 


Daily  Bruin  News 


PRESIDENT 

From  page  1 

Brophy  described  the  selection 
as  "the  most  undemocratic 
process  the  university  has  ever 
been  involved  in,"  and  defended 
it  against  critics  such  as  Lt.  Gov. 
Gray  Davis  who  had  asked  for  it 
to  remain  more  open. 

"We  could  hurt  these  people  on 
the  list  whether  we  select  them  or 
not,  if  we  leak  the  names,"  said 
Brophy,  who  explained  that 
recent  searches  at  New  York  State 


University  and  elsewhere  had 
become  catastrophes  after  candi- 
dates' names  were  leaked  to  iHe* 
media.  The  SUNY  contenders 
pulled  out  after  their  names 
became  public,  to  avoid  problems 
that  may  arise  at  their  present 
positions  by  trying  to  leave. 

Despite  this  secrecy,  rumors 
have  flown  in  the  last  several 
months  about  various  front-run- 
ner candidates  for  Peltason's  job, 
including  both  current  UC  offi- 
cials and  educators  outside  the 
system. 

Until  removing  himself  from 


the  running,  UCLA  Chancellor 
Charles  Young  was  considered  a 
top  contender,  along  with  UC 
Provost  Walter  Massey  and  UC 
Berkeley  Chancellor  Chang  Lin- 
Tien. 

Outside  of  UC  circles,  Brown 
University  President  Vartan 
Gregorian  has  been  mentioned 
for  the  post,  as  has  University  of 
Michigan  President  James 
Duderstat.  CSU  Chancellor  Barry 
Munitz,  as  well  as  some  members 
of  the  Clinton  Administration, 
including  Health  and  Human 
Services    Secretary    Donna 


Shalala,  were  considered  "dark- 
horse"  candidates  in  the  race. 

Davis,  who  as  lieutenant  gov- 
ernor sits  as  a  representative  of 
the  state  government  on  the  board 
of  regents,  said  that  he'd  like  -  at 
the  bare  minimum  -  to  be  able  to 
submit  questions  to  the  selection 
committee  for  the  candidates. 

"At  our  last  meeting,  there 
were  a  lot  of  (regents)  who 
expressed  concern  over  not  hav- 
ing a  role  to  play  in  the  process," 
Davis  said.  "This  is  the  most 
important  decision  we'll  have  to 
make  (as  a  board  of  regents),"  he 


added. 

But  even  this  level  of  openness 
was  too  much  for  Brophy,  who 
said  that  candidates'  answers 
could  give  away  who  they  are. 

After  Brophy's  remarks,  one  of 
the  longest-serving  regents, 
Glenn  Campbell,  alsQ  criticized 
the  process  for  its  secrecy,  saying 
to  Brophy  "I  think  you're  going 
to  have  some  leaks." 

In  immediate  response,  Brophy 
responded  "I'm  the  best  plumber 
you  ever  saw." 

See  PRESIDENT^  page  9 


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Daily  Bruin  News 


Monday,  May  22, 1995       9 


PRESIDENT 

- 
From  page  8 

Backing  up  Brophy  and  the 
secrecy  of  the  process  was 
Faculty  Regent  Dan  Simmons, 
who  chairs  the  faculty  advisory 
committee  for  this  process. 

"Those  of  you  who  speculate 
could  hit  on  the  right  name,  and 
that  could  do  tremendous  damage 
to  the  process,"  said  Simmons, 
adding  that  the  UC  system  could 
lose  the  president  the  regents 
really  wanted  because  of  prema- 
ture publicity. 

^tft  for  the  most  part,  the  board 
agreed  that  secrecy  and  security 
were  vital  for  the  presi^nt-selec- 
tion  process.  Regent  Ward 
Connerly  agreed  there  were  prob- 
lems,  but  said  the  board  of 
regents  still  had  the  final  vote  - 
not  the  selection  committee. 

"This  process  has  lots  of 
imperfections,  but  there's  no  bet- 
ter one,'*  Connerly  said.  "The 
committee  will  bring  to  us  a  rec- 
ommendation, t>ut  we're  the  ones 
who  select  the  president." 


ASUCLA 


From  page  1 


N 


taken  a  positive  attitude  toward 
the  board's  efforts  at  self-reform. 

"1  believe  that  we  should  not 
retreat  from  that  student  majority 
board  of  directors,  but  within  that 

,  general  framework  we  ought  to 
come  up  with  a  mechanism  which 
allows  more  stability  on  the  board 
and  a  better  grounding  in  fmanciall 
reality,"  Young  said. 

Board  members  are  taking  an 

_attitude  similar  JO  Young's.  The 
board  uniformly  agrees  with  the 
concept  of  limiting  board  involve- 
ment, but  some  are  choking  on  a 
few  of  the  larger  proposed 
changes. 

"Let's  decide  what  we 

want  and  give  next  year  s 

board  the  best  ideas  ..." 
Chris  Chaudoir 

Undergraduate  Representative 

Probably  the  n>ost  divisive  issue 
was  the  amount  of  independence 
the  board  should  give  ASUCLA's 
executive  director.  In  particular,  a 
debate  arose  regarding  whether  or 
not  the  board  should  exercise 
approval  of  senior  employees 
hired  by  the  executive  director. 

'This  is  gut  level  litmus  test  for 
your  executive  director.  I  can't  say 
strongly  enough  for  any  (execu- 
tive director)  to  work  here,  he 
won't  want  a  board  looking  over 
his  shoulder  to  approve  his  per- 
sonnel decisions,"  said  Charles 
Mack,  temporary  co-executive 
director. 

"I've  never  Seen  it  work,  it 
doesn't  work,  and  it's  a  bad  idea," 
Mack  stressed. 

But  some  board  members  did 
no!  think  approval  of  such-high- 
ranking  employees  was  too  limit- 
ing to  the  executive  director's 
power. 

"If  the  executive  director  were 
to  come  up  with  somebody  the 
board  did  not  like,  it's  better  he  be 
told  sooner  than  later,"  said  gradu- 
ate representative  Peary  Brug. 

As  the  final  days  tick  away,  the 
board  and  its  recently  hired  attor- 
ney Patrick  Moore  are  scrambling 
to  draft  and  accept  language  they 
can  pass  on  to  next  year's  board. 

"The  changes  we're  looking  at 
are  the  perfect  opportunity  to  do 
what  we've  been  talking  about  all 
along,"  said  Chris  Chaudoir,  an 
undergraduate  representative. 
"Let's  decide  what  we  want  and 
give  next  year's  board  the  best 
ideas  we  have." 


J. A.M. 

SHABBAT 


A  /.A.M.  Vacked  Student 
Shabbat  Excursion 


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Reservations  for  the  Whole  Shabbat 

or  Any  Part  Thereof  are  Required  by 

Wednesday,  May  24, 1995 

To  R.S.V.P.  or  for  more  information  please  call 

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6:15    Pre-Shabbat  "The  Difference  Between  Shabbat 

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6:45    Kab'balat 
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7:15    Shabbat  thnner 
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6:30  pm        "Third  Meal' 


Explanations  of  Key 
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compliments  of  SAA  and  tiie  Alumni  Association 

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(1)  Ask  a  professor  to  lunch. 

(2)  Fill  out  the  coupon  below. 

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RESEARCH 

From  page  3 

However,  a  lack  of  resources 
has  forced  the  department  to  find 
funding  for  a  person  to  run  the 
honors  program  after  next  year. 
Recently,  officials  in  the  depart- 
ment were  told  they  would  have  to 
pick  up  the  tab  for  one  of  their 
special  teacliing  assistant's  - 
about  $20,000  a  year. 
Administrators  in  the  College  of 
Letters  &  Science  said  this  was 
necessitated  by  the  university's 
lack  of  resources. 

"Social  Sciences  has  funded 
one  20-hour  per  week  position  for 
a  teaching  assistant,"  said  Rosie 
Ashamalla,  honors  adviser. 
"We've  already  been  warned  that 
money  may  riot  be  there  after  next 
year.  If  the  funding  is  cut,  this 
thing  will  go  down  the  tubes.  The 
program  is  so  big  now,  it  needs 
somebody  to  run  it."  — 


"If  the  furiding  is  cut, 

(the  program)  will  go 

down  the  tubes." 
Rosle  Ashamalla 

Honors  Adviser 


Administrators  said  they  will  do 
everything  in  their  power  to  sup- 
port honor's  research. 

"It's  an  excellent  program  and 
we  want  to  see  it  thrive,"  said 
ScoU  Waugh,  College  oFLettcrs  & 
Science  dean.  "There  have  been 
some  severe  cuts  all  around.  The 
fact  that  they  can  maintain  such  a 
successful  program  is  very 
admirable." 

For  Crabbc,  being  in  the  honors 
program  not  only  gives  him  a 
sense  of  confidence  in  his  work, 
but  it  also  gives  him  an  edge  over 
other  graduate  school  applicants. 
Now  he's  alrei^dy  demonstrated  an 
ability  for  serious  research,  he 
said. 

"When  1  started  this  program,  I 
had  just  chosen  my  major," 
Crabbe  said.  "Since  Ihcn,  I've 
come  to  my  career  choice.  Thi^s. 
program  was  basically  a  turning 
point.  I've  stopped  worrying  about 
my  future." 

Douglas  Hollan,  a  faculty  mem- 
ber who  sits  on  the  honors  com- 
mittee, has  developed  a 
camaraderie  with  his  students. 
They  joke  and  tease  each  other 
before  the  presentations  and  he 
offers  them  words  of  encourage- 
ment. 

Hollan  said  the  program  has 
forced  professors  to  recognize  the 
caliber  of  work  undergraduates 
arc  capable  of. 

"I  personally  think  we,  tend  to 
infantilizc  people  too  long," 
Hollan  said.  "Undergraduates 
should  be  thinking  more  critically 
and  should  be  challenged  more. 
Too  often,  we  feed  them  informa- 
tion and  ^sk  them  to  regurgitate 
it" 

Though  students  doing  honors 
research  praise  it,  the  program 
was  not  aiways  as  .strong  as  it  is 
now.  ., 

In  1991,  the  program  had  only 
three  students.  With  the  help  of 
Ashamalla  and  Director  Jim  Hill, 
the  program  became  a  successful 
part  of  undergraduate  studies.  In 
winter  quarter  1992,  15  students 
enrolled  in  the  program  and  in 
winter  quarter  1994.  anthropology 
officials  were  forced  lo  cap  enroll- 
ment at  20,  turning  away  10  quali- 
fied applicants,  Ashamalla  said. 

"For  a  teacher,  one  of  the  things 
that's  really  nice  about  the  pro- 
gram is  that  students  come  back 
and  talk  to  you  about  what  they've 
learned."  said  Peter  Hammond, 
anthropolojgy  professor.  "It's 
tremendously  rewarding." 


Daily  Bruin  Newt 


Monday,  May  22, 1995    11 


BGSA 


From  page  3 

tain  groups  are  entitled  s'pace  within 
the  office. 

Access  to  computer  resources, 
conference  space  and  general  office 
services  are  some  of  the  advantages 
of  working  within  the  graduate 
association.  Cox  explained. 

'  In  contrast,  last  year's  organiza- 
tion had  no  connection  with  the 
Graduate  Students  As.sociation,  but 
worked  mainly  through  the  graduate 
division's  Affirmative  Affairs 
Office,  Parker  said.  The  office  is 
responsible  for  outreach  programs 
targeting  minority  students. 

"We  didn't  know  anybody  in 
GSA,  and. the  Affirmative  Affairs 
office  had  the  information  we  need- 
ed such  as  racially  selective  print- 
outs for  mailers,"  Parker  said. 

Although  the  current  Black 
Graduate  Students  Association 
plans  to  work  on  mentorship  and 
community  service  programs, 
which  characterized  the  organiza- 
tion's agenda  last  year,  its  main 
focus  is  affirmative  action,  Cox  said. 

With  a  committee  devoted  to  the 
issue,  the  immediate  goal  is  to  edu- 
cate members  on  the  controversial 
topic,  said  committee  chair  Vince 
Hutchings.  Future  plans  include 
working  with  other  groups  to  pro- 
mole  awareness. 

"Our  principle  goal  is  to  gather 
objective  facts  and  data,  and  to 
become  more  acquainted  with  the 
pros  and  cons  to  inform  the  general 
body,"  Hutchings  said. 
^  "We  hope  tn  work  with  other 
organizations  that  have  a  strong 
stand  on  the  issue  like  La  Ra/.a  (the 
Latino  graduate  students  as.socia- 
tion). put  together  flyers  and 
encourage  people  to  calland  get 
local  legislators  to  take  a  public 
.stand  on  the  issue."  he  added. 

In  addition  to  the  Black  Graduate 
Students  Association,  other  gradu- 
ate student  advocacy  groups  such  as 
La  Raza  and  the  International 
Students  Association  are  entitled  to 
representation  within  the  Graduate 
Students  Association. 

Kstablishing  lies  with  all  such 
groups  is  one  of  the  main  goals  for 
graduate  student  president-elect 
John  Shapley. 

"It's  imperative  for  every  under- 
represented  group  to  have  a  place 
(iiTGSA),"hesaid. 


FINANCE 


From  page  3 

have  contributed  significantly  to 
the  family  incomes.  And  presently 
we  are  in  the  workplace  even 
more,"  she  added. 

Cara  Chow«  a  fifth-year 
Fnglish/psychology  student,  said 
that  she  had  been  thinking  a  lot 
about  her  financial  security. 
Graduating  this  June  and  entering 
the  School  of  Social  Welfare  in 
the  fall,  she  thinks  that  working  in 
her  field  will  not  pay  as  much  as 
being  a  doctor  or  a  lawyer.  To 
compensate  for  that,  she  wants  lo 
start  saving  for  the  future. 

"It's  better  to  know  s(K)ncr  than 
later.  I  am  an  independent  person. 
I  would  never  rely  on  anybody 
else,  husband  or  parents,"  lilana 
Nabati,  third-year  psychology  stu- 
dent said.  "I  wasn't  aware  of  how 
to  invest  fxjforc," 

Now,  she  is  planning  to  buy 
some  stocks  and  open  an 
Individual  Retirement  Account 
(IRA)  instead  of  a  savings 
account.  These  accounts  usually 
accrue  tax  deferred  interest  over 
the  years,  and  with  regular 
deposits  and  no  withdrawals,  they 
can  amount  lo  a  sizeable  retiirc- 
menl  fund. 

Next  year  the  women's  center 
hopes  to  offer  a  sprics  of  work- 
shops.about  financial  manage^' 
ipcnt. 


i*n 


*  Law  Enforcement  and  Fire  Departments  From  Various  Counties  * 


^  •    Law 

Enforcement 


Career  lExpcj 


at 


Caiiiokma  .Siaii  Umviksiiv  Los  A\(.i  I  is 


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10  am  -  3  pm 

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THE  UCLA  FOLKLORE  &  MYTHOLOGY  PR(X)RAM  &  ARCHIVE  PRE.SENT 


Old  World/New  Wdri 


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rPIDAY.  MAY26.  1995.  I  VMT0  6VM 

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SUNDAY.  MAY  28.  !^^>5.  10  AM  T(  )  I  PM 

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12     Monday,  May  22, 1995 


i 


Daily  Bruin  Viewpoint 


Viewpoint 


Counterpoint 


Associate  greeks  with  UCLA,  not  witli  gliosts  of  past 


By  Brent  Hayward 

Joey  Gil  ("Students  First  repre- 
sents special  interests  of  stu- 
dents;  May^TT),  yoFare  a  clown. 
Thanks  for  the  circus  act  you  put 
on  Wednesday  in  the  Daily  Bruin. 

Unfortunately,  many  of  us 
weren't  convinced  by  the  song 
and  dance  and  believed  that  what 
Gil  said  was  no  more  then  a 
bunch  of  groundless  rhetoric. 

First,  let's  talk  about  Gil's 

response  to  the  article  by  Scott 
Burros  ("Students  First!  priorities 
lie  with  advocacy  groups,"  May 
15.)  Here  is  another  example  of 
someone  reading  too  far  into  an 
article  or,  "reading  for  the  content 
that  they  want  to  hear,"  as  some 
like  to  call  it.  While  striking  back 
at  Burros  in  defense,  Gil  failed  to 
gtas'p  the  entire  point.  His  article 
wasn't  about  the  elections. 
Proposition  187,  the  constitution-" 
ality  of  the  two  issues  or  the  J- 
Bourd  decision. 

Here  it  i<w  plain  and  simple,  so 
;pay  close  attention:  Last  year,  the 
slate  now  known  as  Students  First 
lost  the  election  to  the  opposition 
and  cried  foul,  staling  the  democ- 
ratic election  process  was  a  fluke 
and  should  be  thrown  out  the  win- 


dow. This  year,  they  won  the  elec- 
tion, yet  cried  foul  when  forced  to 
hold  a  re-election.  A  re-election 
w^)uid  have  declared  this  process 
a  democracy,  which  they  previ- 
ously mocked,  as  the  final  word. 
He! Ui'.!  .Does  the  name  Johnny 
Cochran  ct)me  to  mind? 

Yo'u  can't  do  thai,  guys!  I  have 
watched  this  happen  again  and 
a^ain  as,  in  my  view,  the  Students 
First  slate  argues  against  the  very 
principles  it  has  previously  sup- 
ported. Here's  a  little  advice:  Try 
to  remember  what  you  support 
thiiweek  because  it  doesn't  look 
good  when  you  go  against  it  next 
week. 

Oh,  but  wait,  I  forgot,  this  time, 
the  "students  have  spoken."  An 
unprecedented  voter  turnout  of 
less  than  20  percent  showed  up  to 
the  re-election  where  no  candi- 
date won  by  more  than  4  percent 
of  the  vote.  Yes,  indeed,  10  per- 
cent of  the  students  on  this  cam- 
pus have  spoken. 

It  is  still  unbeliicvable  to  me 
that  Students  First  ran^a  campaign 
claiming  to  be  the  voice  of  the 
student  body,  yet  still  refuses  to 
recognize  greeks  -  the  largest, 
most  ethnically  diverse  student 


group  that  by  far  contributes  more 
to  this  campus  than  any  other 
group. 

Maybe  it's  time  the  Students 
First  organization  stopped  under- 
mining the  student  body  by  auto- 
matically assuming  that  its 
position  on  any  and  every  issue 
best  represents  the  sentiments  of 
the  entire  campus. 

Hnough  of  the  Burros  article, 
however:  I  have  a  more  personal 
bone  to  pick  with  (jil,  whose 
comments  on  the  greek  system  I 
found  to  be  ridiculous,  angering 
and  extremely  insulting. 

Like  Gil,  I  too  am  only  a 


sophomore,  but  unlike  him,  I 
chose  to  join  the  greek  system 
because  I  felt  it  would  be  benefi- 
cial to  my  college  experience.  I 
too  had  heard  about  the  past,  the 
songs,  the  parties,  the  wrong- 
doings and  was  neither  proud  nor 
supportive  of  their  occurrence. 

Since  I  have  been  in  the  greek 
system,  however,  I  have  partici- 
pated in  hours  of  philanthropy, 
feeding  the  homeless,  donating  to 
the  Heart  Foundation  and  work- 
ing with  underprivileged  children, 
as  well  as  working  with  and 
attending  educational  greek-wide 
programs  on  rape,  alcohol  abu.se. 


drug  abuse  and  other  such  pro- 
grams. 

I  have  worked  hard  within  the 
system  to  remove  the  things  that 
pait^ta  b^d  picture  (e.g.  the  song- 
books)  and  to  promote  the  much 
more  positive  and  rewarding 
aspects  of  greek  life. 

Now  I  ask  Gil  .and  others  like 
him,  what  have  you  done?  Were 
you  around  when  "Tequila 
Sunrise"  parties  were  going  on? 
Were  you  here  to  see  the  song- 
books  go  public?  Have  you  ever 
actually  stepped  foot  into  a  frater- 
nity or  .sorority  house  and  met 
some  of  the  students? 


I  have  been  a  student  at  UCLA 
for  two  years  and  have  neither 
witnessed  nor  been  a  part  of  any 
of  the  events  involving  greeks  that 
Gtt^iaied  inhis  article.  And  just — 
for  an  update,  the  last  'Tequila 
Sunrise"  party,  at  the  latest,  hap- 
pened in  1990  and  the  songbooks 
controversy  happened  when  I  was 
a  senior  in  high  school. 

I'm  sorry,  but  am  I  to  assume  \ 
should  be  held  accountable  for 
the  events  that  took  place  at 
UCLA  while  I  was  still  in  high 
school? 

All  I  have  done  is  come  to 
UCLA  with  a  chance  to  make  it, 
just  like  everybody  else.  How  can 
anyone  be  so  hypocritical  to  hold 
against  me  things  in  the  past 
which  I  have  no  responsibility  for, 
yet  am  trying  to  remedy?  How 
can  anyone  make  such  broad 
judgements  based  on  events  they 
haven't  even  witoes.sed  firsthand? 
How  can  anyone  possibly  claim 
that  they  are  more  of  a  UCLA  stu- 
dent than  I  am,  and  that  their  sin- 
gle voice  deserves  to  be  heard  and . 
mine  does  not? 

Oh,  but  wait,  I  want  to  be  heard 
because  1  get  $1(X),(X)0  to  spend. 
Wrong  again! 

First  try  cutting  that  amount  to 
about  $1,(X)0,  and  then  realize 
that  greek  students  themselves 
don't  .see  a  penny  of  that  money. 
It  goes  toward  paying  the  salaries 
of  those  hard-working  individuals 
who  run  the  national  greek  coun- 
cils as  well  as  the  educational 
programs  and  seminars  to 
improve  the  greek  system. 

Need  I  also  remind  that  the 
greek  system  includes  the  Asian__ 
and  African  American  greek 
councifs  as  well  as  Interfraternity 
and  PanHellenic  greeks.  I  have 
many  friends  of  all  colors,  greeks 
and  non-greeks  alike,  who 
deserve  to  have  their  voices  heard 
and  recognized. 

So  if  not  for  the  money,  you 
ask,  why  would  greeks  want  to  be 
re-sponsored?  Maybe  because 
each  greek  student  would  like  to 
be  able  to  voice  his  opinion  just 
like  you,  because  it  matters  to 
him  and  because  he  has  worked 
so  hard  to  climb  out  of  the  hole 
dug  by  the  occurrences  of  the 
past. 

The  fact  is,  in  my  view,  Gil's 
arguments  about  the  greek  system 
are  old  news  and  full  of  untruths. 

See  HAYWARD,  page  15 


Letter 


He's  just  too 
civilized  for  L.A. 

Editor: 

I  would  like  to  add  my  support  to  the  sen- 
timent expressed  by  Steve  Eck  in  the  letter 
titled  'Too  Weak  for  the  Midwest?"  in  the 
May  18  Daily  Bruin. 

It  never  ceases  to  amaze  me  how  Los 
Angelenos  remain  convinced  they  live  in  a 
nice  place.  Of  course,  the  weather  is  blandly 


consistent  and  one  does  wake  up  every 
morning  with  the  knowledge  that  he  or  she 
may  get  to  see  a  mooovie  star,  but  short  of 
that,  I  feel  there  is  little  to  recommend  it. 

All  of  that  aside,  I  find  the  constant  abuse 
to  which  the  Midwest  is  subjected  to  be 
absolutely  unjust.  I  grew  up  in  Indiana,  did 
my  undergraduate  study  in  Chicago  and  can 
honestly  say  that  I  would  easily  choo.se  either 
one  of  those  places  over  most  locations  in 
Southern  California,  particularly  Los 
Angeles,  as  a  permanent  home. 


Even  in  large  cities,  people  in  the  Midwest 
are  consistently  friendly.  As  far  as  I  know, 
highway  shootings  never  caught  on  in  the 
Midwest,  and  Chicago  only  riots  when  the 
Bulls  win.  Human  interaction  is  an  art  which 
still  survives  in  the  Midwest.  It  may  come  as 
a  surprise  to  some,  but  the  mall  is  not  the 
center  of  civilization  and  a  human  being  is 
quite  often  more  than  the  sum  total  of  all  of 
the  brand  names  he  happens  to  be  in  posses- 
sion of  at  the  moment. 

Some  of  us  actually  do  not  dream  of  living 


in  a  sterile  "rich  California  folks"  house  (each 
with  the  standard  impeccably  manicured 
lawn)  and  would  easily  pass  on  joining  the 
intermittent  parade  of  "one  overly  made-up, 
nicotine-stained  professional"  per  Mercedes 
Benz  that  passes  through  Westwood. 

Perhaps  if  I  am  not  "too  cool  for  the 
Midwest,"  I  am  just  too  civilized  for  Los 
Angeles? 

Tomas  DuBois 

Graduate  student 

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Daily  Bruin  VIewpoliit 


Column 


IMonday,  May  22;  1995    13 


Apartment  hunting,  voyeurism ...  searching  forHome 


What  place  do  you  call 
home? 
Dusk  approaches  and  I 
feel  like  a  wart  on  the  juicy  rouiid 
underbelly  of  Los  Angeles  subur- 
bia -  unU'anted,  unsightly  and  out 
of  place. 

Civilization  surges  around  me 
in  a  giant  gastrointestinal  whirl.  I 
wander  aimlessly  through  the  side 
streets  of  West  Los  Angeles  under 
the  pretense  of  "apartment  hunt- 
ing." My  roommate  and  I  are  soon 


loT)e  evicted  fronTour  doritv 
haven  but  the  city  animals  are 
oblivious  to        ■■^■■n^Bi^ 


Geraldine 
Alimurung 


our  distress. 
Squirrels  bask 
in  the  purple 
evening  light. 
Bats  squeak 
overhead  and 
glide  by  like 
miniature 
black  kites.  A 
dog  barks. 
Ants  scurry 
about  under- 
foot in  their 

version  of  

evening  rush- 
hour  traffic. 

1  stop  to  admire  one  particular- 
ly striking  house.  It  is  constructed 
of  brick.  Not  the  crisp,  chalky 
new  brick  but  the  old,  moist  kind 
that  looks  like  it  has  been  around 
since  creation  -  the  same  deep^   v^ 
brownish-red  silly  putty  from 
which  Adam  himself  was  molded. 
If  I  were  ivy,  I  would  grow  on  it 
too. 

With  a  budget  no  where  near 
the  $500,000  price  these  houses 
command,  I  can  only  gawk  at  the 
5hiny  window  squares  of  warm 
yellow  light  and  wonder  what  the 
people  inside  are  doing.  Are  they 
having  dinner?  And  if  so,  what  are 
they  having?  Is  that  the  daughter 
sprawled  out  in  front  of  the  televi- 
sion doing  her  homework,  waiting 
for  the  rest  of  the  family  to  come 
home?  Does  their  cat  eat  table 


*\ 


scraps  or  kitty  kibble?  Although  I 
am  neither  a  secret  agent  nor  a 
private  detective,  I  seem  to  have 
done  a  lot  of  this  "peeping"  in  my 
lifetime. 

Barbie  was  my  first  victim.  She 
had  the  perfect  house  -  an  orange 
and  yellow  polyurethane  master- 
piece of  architectural  prowess. 
The  "Dream  House,"  Mattel 
called  it;  and  indeed  it  was  to  me 
a  house  of  dreams,  hopes,  and 
yes,  dare  we  say  it ...  wishes.  It 
came  with  its  own  coordinated  set 
of  lime-green  and  fuchsia  late- 
seventies-style  furniture.  Fuzzy 
white  faux-bearskin  rugs,  green 
snap-together  cushioned  bubble 
sofas,  pink  foam-padded  dinner 
chairs  ...  nothing  but  the  finest 
plastics  and  acrylics  for  this  picky 
9-year-old  girl. 


The  Dream  House  sat  on  top  of 
a  huge  white  drafting  table  in  the 
middle  of  the  living  room. 
Oftentimes,  I  would  sneak  down 
in  the  middle  of  the  night  and 
look  in  on  the  dolls  just  to  see 
what  they  were  up  to.  It  gave  me 
no  end  of  pleasure  when  my 
cousin  figured  out  how  to  rig  up 
miniature  battery-operated  lights 
to  the  six  rooms  of  Barbie's  man- 
sion. The  orange  plastic  house 
looked  best  in  the  early  evening, 
its  cheerful  little  "lamps"  blazing 
bravely  into  the  darkness,  wel- 
coming the  dolls  back  into  their 
kitschy  abode. 

1  spent  hours  just  watching  the 
Barbie  dolls  in  the  various  "true- 
to-life"  poses  I'd  put  them  in. 
They  had  names,  hobbies,  favorite 
foods  and  vocations.  The  stories 
of  their  lives  rivaled  those  of 
"Melrose  Place";  their  comings 
and  goings  were  epic,  tragic, 
comic,  a  psychotic  whirl  of  birth- 
day parties,  barbecues.'KTdnap- 
pings,  UFO  abductions,  fashion 
shows,  even  the  occasional  dragon 
slaying  or  two.  In  Barbie-land,  the 
kidnappers  always  got  caught,  the 
aliens  were  always  friendly,  the 
dragons  were  always  slain  and  all 
the  Barbies  received  their  fair 


oves 


share  of  birthday  cake..  So,  so    

badly  did  I  want  to  be  a  part  of 
this  life  -  sans  the  plastic,  of 
course. 

A  garage  sale  eventually 
claimed  the  Dream  House.  I  did- 
n't mind  so  much  giving  it  up  for, 
seven  years  later,  I'd  moved  on  to 
bigger  fare.  One  night  after  a  date 
I  drove  around  Walnut  looking  at 
the  various  tract  houses  from  my 
car.  "It's  amazing  what,  people  can 
do  with  tract  houses,"  I  thought  as 
I  roved  along  the  wide,  hilly 
streets.  They  start  out  nearly  iden- 
tical -  yet  somehow,  these  lumps 
of  wood,  stucco  and  cardboard 
end  up  soaking  in  all  the  personal- 
ity of  the  inhabitants. 

For  a  long  time,  I  parked  along 
the  sidewalk  underneath  one  par- 
ticular house.  A  flickering  blue 
glow  emanated  from  a  small  sec- 
ond story  window.  I  found  it 
strangely  comforting  that  some- 
one was  awake  at  that  late  hour  I 
leaned  back  into  the  faded  sheep- 
skin seat  covers  and  shut  off  the 
car  lights.  Perhaps  a  young  person 
like  me,  some  equally  anonymous 
16-year-old  dork,  home  also  from 
a  wretched  date,  was  channel  surf- 
ing the  late-night  programming, 
snuggled  in  bed  and  wondering  all 


kinds  of  crazy  late-night  thoughts. 
Was  the  bed  pushed  up  next  to 
the  window,  with  the  drowsy 
viewer  scrunched  up  into  the  cor- 
ner against  the  pillows?  What  pro- 
gram was  on?  I  considered 
returning  to  my  own  house,  dig;- 
ging  up  our  old  pair  of  binoculars 
and  finding  out  what  channel  my 
fellow  dork  wa&  watching.  But 

I  read  somewhere  in 

some  magazine  that  we 

are  all  voyeurs  to  a 

certain  extent,  that 

we  need  to  look  in 

on  other  people's 

lives  to  give  meaning 

to  our  own. 


instead  I  started  up  the  car  and 
drove  away  with  the  headlights 
off,  disgusted  with  myself,  feeling 
not  a  little  like  a  deranged  stalker 

Various  other  situations  come 
to  mind:  pulling  the  hotel  bed 
close  to  the  window  on  a  family 
trip  to  San  Francisco  so  that 


before  i  drifted  off  to  sleep  I 
might  invent  stories  for  the  tiny 
figures  moving  around  in  the  adja- 
cent office  buildings,  trying  to 
picture  a  living  cross  section  of 
Sproul  Hall  during  an  unu.sually  ^ 
severe  bout  of  insomnia,  poring 
over  "Tokyo  Style."  a  photo- 
anthology  of  modem  Japanese 
apartments,  toilet  shots  included. 

Call  me  a  sicko,  a  pervert,  a 
sicko-pervert  if  you  will  -  but  I 
swear  my  tendency  is  not  toward 
hard-core  voyeurism.  It  is  not  sex- 
ual stimulation  I  seek,  but  Home. 
Not  "home"  of  the  generic  one 
mom,  one  dad,  1 .5  kid  variety,  but 
rather  the  feeling  of  "home,"  of 
events  and  places  and  people  and 
experiences  coming  full  circle,  the 
feeling  of  an  inalienable,  inde- 
structible completeness  and  con- 
nectedness. 

I  read  somewhere  in  some  mag- 
azine that  we  are  all  voyeurs  to  a 
certain  extent,  that  we  need  to 
look  in  on  other  people's  lives  to"^ 
give  meaiiing  to  our  own.  Scary, 
this  idea  that  we  are  all  looking 
around  at  eacji  other,  "looking  in" 
through  the  picture  windows  of 
each  others'  respective  living 

See  AUMURUNQ,  page  15 


/ 


SurcVhe  Uooiy  cxxt  >^<^Ae 
W»r^  look   like  t\J\\  \^' 

ExtcuVioner  Wa.s  really 
t\oVW»r\3  W'V  a  big  50^ ^y.  € 


U  \J. 


^       --  --^  ^ "  ^     I 


'^w 


;;5s«"i«r 


loiiil  C  o  I II  111  nisi 


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Students  do 
have  a  voice 
wtthin  their 
departments 

By  Lynee  Kniss 

After  my  first  couple  of  quar- 
ters at  UCLA  (that  is,  after  the 
panic  of  college  course  work  and 
the  shock  of  the  campus'  immense 
size  wore  ofO,  I  began  to  have 
questions  about  academic  issues,  — 
the  procedures  of  my  department^ 
and  how  they  affected  me  and  my 
fellow  undergraduates. 

At  that  point,  I  wondered, 
"How  do  changes  get  made  and 
how  are  new  programs  imple- 
mented within  one's  department?" 
This  naturally  flowed  into  the 
question,  "How  are  the  students' 
concerns,  ideas  and  opinions 
heard  within  the  university  as  a 
whole?" 

Through  some  classmates,  I 
was  introduced  to  the  Art  History 
Undergraduate  Student 
Association.  This  group  of  stu- 
dents was  making  dramatic  and 
important  changes  at  the  depart- 
mental level.  They  were  doing 
this  by  having  advisory  votes  in 
faculty  meetings,  representation 
on  committees,  overseeing  class 
schedules  (so  that  students  can 
take  the  necessary  classes  in  order 
to  graduate  within  a  reasonable 
time!),  and  instituting  programs 
such  as  Departmental  Honors  and 
others. 
^itb4nyf>articipatien  and 


involvement  in  my  department's 
student  group.  I  realized  that  you 
do  not  have  to  take  on  a  large  and 
overwhelming  responsibility  in 
order  to  make  a  difference.  By 
taking  small  steps  at  the  depart- 
mental level  with  curricular 
reform,  representation  and  deci- 
sion-making power,  students  can 
make  distinct  and  often  immedi- 
ate changes  affecting  the  universi- 
ty community  on  a  whole.  I 
believe  that  those  students  already 
involved  in  student  groups  would 
agree  that  these  associations  are 
beneficial. 

What  is  just  as  important  is  an 
arena  for  these  student  groups  to 
communicate  with  each  other.  In 
this  way,  they  can  share  knowl- 
edge and  ideas,  as  well  as  develop 
an  effective  means  for  the  student 
voice  to  be  heard  at  the  university 
level.  The  Student  Departmental 
Senate  can  achieve  this  by  provid- 
ing a  direct  channel  presenting  q, 
concentrated  student  voice  to  the 
Academic  Senate. 

The  Student  Depanmcntal 
Senate  can  be  the  resource  in 
which  the  concerns  and  opinions 
of  a  multitude  of  students  can  be 
heard  -  by  channeling  individu- 
als' concerns  and  opinions  to  their 
student  as.sociation.  From  there, 
these  issues  can  be  presented  to 
the  Student  Departmental  Senate 
via  the  as.s(Kiation's  representa- 
tives (known  as  .senators). 

Reciprocally,  this  can  be  the 
means  through  which  the 
Academic  Senate  can  communi- 
cate its  activities,  initiatives  and 
proposals  and  their  outcomes  to 
the  students  in  a^ore  efficient 
and  timely  manner. 

The  majority  of  us  have  made  a 
conscientious  decision  to  obtain 
our  education  at  UCLA  ba.sed 
upon  its  acadcmjc>eputation.  We 
need  to  ensure,  to  the  best  of  our 
ability,  that  UCLA  continues  to  be 
regarded  as  one  of  the  state's  and 
nation's  top  institution;!;  of  higher 

See  KNISS,  page  15 


/" 


Daily  Bruin  Viewpoint 


IMonday,  May  22, 1996    15 


ALIMURUNG 


From  page  13 

rooms  in  an  attempt  to  Hnd  some 
meaning  in  our  own  lives.  It's 
weird  how  people  manage  to  slip 
in  and  out  of  your  life  like  so 
many  ghosts  flitting  through  the.se 
picture  windows:  One  moment 
they're  vivid,  present  in  all  their 
colorful  human  glory,  the  next 
they're  gone  and  you're  left  look- 
ing after  them,  into  the  warm 
glow  of  their  lives  now  separated 
by  some  invisible  boundary,  a 
clear  glass  windowpane  of  dis- 
tance. 

^-  You  wonder  if  ihey  were  ever 
there  in  the  first  place. 

I'm  starting  to  wonder  if  the 
Good  Witch  of  the  East  was  right 
all  along:  "Just  close  your  eyes, 
click  your  heels  three  rimes  and 
whisper  'I  wanna  go  home.'" 
Maybe  the  only  way  to  find  that 
home  is  to  take  your  eyes  off  your 
neighbor's  paper,  shut  them  peep- 

.  ers  tight  and  look  inside. 

So,  anyway,  no  apartment  today 
...  but  the  bunt  continues. 

Alimurung  ix  a  fourth-year 
student  majoring  in  English  and 
psychology.  Her  columns  appear 
on  alternate  Mondays. 

HAYWARP 

From  page  12 

It  would  really  amaze  me  if  he 
actually  made  an  effort  to  work 
with  me  toward  a  common  goal 
rather  then  attack  me  without 
provocation. 

J(x;y  Gil,  I  challenge  you  to 
xomc  jneel  me  and-Spcnxla  w£ek^ 


getting  to  know  the  greek  system. 
Then  you  can  formulate  some 
opinions  based  on  experience. 

Maybe  you  could  make  a 
phone  call  to  the  Office  of 
Fraternity  and  Sorority  Relations 
at  206-1868  to  get  more  informa- 
tion on  a  subject  about  which  you 
arc  poorly  educated.  Furthemaore, 
you  can  ask  for  Greg  Gratteau, 
vice  president  of  the 
Interfratemity  Council,  who 
would  be  happy  to  di.scuss  with 
you  the  greek  system  of  today. 

Finally,  I  apologize  if  I  have 
offended  anyone  with  this  article. 
It  just  makes  me  angry  to  be  slan- 
dered for  something  I  am  working 
so  hard  to  improve,  as  are  many 
others.  It's4ime  to  get  with  the 
times.  The  greek  system  has  vast- 
ly changed  and  not  all  of  the  stu- 
dents are  getting  a  chance  to 
speak. 


Hayward  is  a  sophomore 
engineering  student. 

KNISS 


From  page  14 

^  learning.  As  students,  we  can  do 
this  through  our  input  at  the 
departmental  level  and  involve- 
ment in  Student  Departmental 
Senate.  If  you  have  ever  thought 

"^bout  getting  involved  ...  DO  IT. 
Your  involvement  does  not 
have  to  be  an  all-or-nothing  ven- 
ture. Join  your  department's  stu- 
dent association.  If  your  major 
does  not  already  have  one,  get  a 
few  friends  together  and  start  one. 
This  is  not  difficult  to  achieve, 
especially  if  you  attend  Student 
Departmental  Senate  meetings 
where  they  can  help  you  with  the 
process.  You  can  make  your  asso- 
ciation what  you  want;  big  or 
small,  extremely  vocal  or  just 
vocal  enough.  You  can  make  your 
education  what  you  want.  You 
have  that  choice.. .USE  IT! 


Kni.ss,  a  .senior  art  history 
student,  is  chair  of  the 
undergraduate  art  history  student 
association. 


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16    Monday,  May  22, 1995 


Daily  Bruin  Arts  &  Entertainment' 


Monday,  May  22, 1995     17 


Arts  &  Entertainment 


'\ 


Lollapalooza's  mean^rt^how 


When  a  tattooed  surfer  walked  into  Julie  Rico's  Santa  Monica  art 
—gallery,  Rico  didn't  think  much  of  it.  Little  did  she  know  that  the 
surfer  was  LoUapalooza  founder  Perry  Farrell  and  that  she  was  about 

to  make  the  biggest  deal  of  her  young  career. 

jm       I       Ml— —■—■I 


7 


The  LoUapalooza  "Mean  Art"  exhibit 
ncludes  photographs  taken  from  artist 
Glen  Friedman's  new  book, "Fuck  You 
Heroes,"  which  documents  the  under- 
ground scene  that  thrived  in  West  L.A. 
between  1976  and  1991.  Clockwise  from 
top  left:  Jay  Adams  (1976),  Beastie  Boys 
(1991),  LL  Cool  J  (1985),  Ian  Mackaye 
of  Minor  Threat  (1982),  Run  DMC  (1985). 


When  Perry  Farrell  strolled  into  a  Santa 
Monica  art  gallery  from  the  surf  shop  next 
door,  owner  Julie  Rico  had  no  idea  he  was 
the  founder  of  one  of  the  most  influential  rock  bands 
of  the  '80s,  let  alone  the  founder  of  LoUapalooza. 

"I  didn't  know  who  he  was  when  he  walked  in 
here.  I  didn't  know  about  Jane's  Addiction  . . .  Porno 
For  Pyros.  I'd  never  heard  of  the  guy,"  says  Rico. 

But  after  signing  a  deal  with  Farrell  that  would  give 
her  gallery's  artists  a  major  exhibit  at  this  year's 
LoUapalooza  concert  tour,  she  understood  exactly 
who  he  was. 

When  Farrell  first  introduced  the  idea  of  doing  the 
tour  to  Rico,  he  told  her  he  wanted  more  artwork 
included  on  the  tour.  He  had  shown  art  at  the  festival 
over  the  last  four  years,  but  none  of  the  exhibits  were 
as  comprehensive  as  he  would've  Hked. 

Farrell  liked  the  message  behind  the  art  in  Rico's 
gallery.  He  asked  the  gallery  owner  if  she  would  be 
interested  in  coordinating  with  her  artists  an  exhibit, 
titled  "Mean  Art,"  to  complement  this  year's  festival. 

It  made  sense.  Over  the  years,  R  co  had  worked 
with  a  variety  of  artists  that  would  appeal  to  the 
young  crowd  atu-acted  by  LoUapalooza. 

After  talking  to  Farrell,  she  made  a  proposal  to  the 
LoUapalooza  committee.  They  loved  it,  and  the  rest  is 
history  in  the  making. 

Her  ideas  for  the  new  LoUapalooza  exhibit,  as  well 
as  her  gallery,  promote  and  reflect  the  intense  and 
diverse  lifestyles  of  Los  Angeles. 

"J, mix  really  high  art  with  really  low  art  ...  and  I 
try  and  mix  all  kinds  of  ideas  in  a  multicultural  view- 
point," she  comments.     ^  '' 

The  artists  Rico  has  chosen  for  the  exhibit  reflect 
her  concept  of  what  the  art  on  the  tour  should  com- 
municate. Artists  like  Craig  Stecyk,  Robert  Williams 
and  Glen  Friedman  share  Rico's  desire  to  expose  the 
thriving  underbelly  of  L.A.  culture  and  all  of  its  pock- 
ets. 

"America  is  .supposed  to  be  a  multiplicity  of  differ- 
ent influences  and  attitudes,  cultures  and  beliefs  and 
thoughts.  They're  supposed  to  come  together  and  be 
more  dynamic  than  what  was  there  before.  I  think  the 
tour  does  that,"  says  contributing  artist  Stecyk,  a  vet- 
eran of  the  West  i^.  A.  art,  skate  and  hot  rod  scene. 

Rico  also  plans  to  gather  art  that  is  educational  and 
philosophical  as  well  as  entertaining. 

The  title  of  the  LoUapalooza  exhibit,  "Mean  Art," 
comes  from  one  of  the  first  works  Farrell  bought  from 
Rico,  on  which  was  scrawled  the  word  "mean." 

Farrell  partakes  of  the  surfer  ideology  that  every- 
thing is  connected  and  saw  the  multiple  meanings  of 
the  word  as  a  symbol  of  the  multiple  lifestyles  and 
types  of  art  represented  in  the  exhibit. 

Plus,  it  sounded  cool.  Rico  wanted  her  name  on  the 
exhibit,  but  Farrell  said  (according  to  Rico),''"rm  not 
sure  people  would  go  into  the  Julie  Rico  gallery,  but 
they  might  go  into  the  'Mean  Art'  tent." 

Except  for  the  title,  Farrell  and  the  LoUapalooza 
commit^e  have  given  Rico  free  reign  to  develop  the 
jfcproject  as  she  sees  fit.  Rico  chose  to  showcase  the 
thriving,  but  often  dismissed,  local  art  scene. 

"The  biggest  link  for  all  the  artists  is  that  98  per- 
cent of  them  are  from  Los  Angeles.  And  that  to  me  is 
a  big,  big  statement  that  we're  making,  because  the  art 
world  as  a  whole  disregards  the  West  Coast  as  being  a 
center  for  art.  And  I  totally  disagree  with  that." 

Rico  feels  that  Los  Angeles  has  a  unique  atmos- 
phere that  stimulates  creativity.  The  diverse  cultures, 
the  draw  of  Hollywood  and  even  the  weather  create 
tensions  and  energies  that  bump  against  each  other 
and  find  release  through  art. 

But  this  isn't  your  ordinary  high  falutin',  quiet 
please,  churches  and  landscapes  art.  There's  a  graffiti 
yard  of  full-color,  full-size  city  scenes,  complete  with 
street  signs,  bus  stop  benches  and  even  a  spray  can 
artist  to  show  you  hovy  it's  done  if  you  want  to  join  in. 


Glen  Friedman's  book  includes  Henry  Rollins  of  Black  Rag  (1981).  "The  reason  I  connected 
skateboarding  and  punk  rock  and  hip  hop  -  it's  definitely  all  attitude  ...,"  the  artist  says. 

"There  are  surf  elements  and  skate  elements,  hot 
rod  elements  and  hip  hop  elements  in  a  lot  of  the  work 
that  she's  (Rico)  chosen,  and  I  think  that's  what's 
good  -  the  wayTTyorks  together,"  says  Stecyk,  whose  .  • 

works  symbolizing  American  popular  culture  are 
shown  in  national  galleries  from  New  Zealand  to 
Israel.  * 

His  installation  will  include  "elements  of  cast-off 
American  culture"  -  hood  ornaments,  hub  caps  and 
many  other  jewels  gleaned  from  abandoned  automo- 
tive beauties. 

"At  one  point  they  were  exalted  elements  of  status, 
prestige  and  marketing  and  then  they  reached  a  low 
ebb  where  they  were  absolutely  disposable  and  cast 
off,  which  is  where  I  encountered  them,"  says  Stecyk. 

Also  planned  is  a  3-D  tent  with  art  by  Robert 
Williams  and  Ray  Zone.  Forget  Captain  EO  -  these 

monstrous  holograms  are  over  30  levels  deep  and  sur-  ^  : 

round  you  within  the  tent.  Another  room  will  be  filled 
with  the  "low  brow  art"  of  the  San  Francisco  and  Los 
Angeles  grunge  and  punk  influenced  artists,  including 
many  underground  cartoonists. 

And  for  all  hardcore  rap,  punk  and  skateboarding 


See  LOJLAPAUKttA,  page  20 


18    Monday,  May  22, 1995 


Daily  Bruirr  Arts  &  Entertalmnafit 


Baby  Chaos,  Safe  Sex, 
Designer  Drugs  and  the  Death 
of  Rock  and  Roll  (eastwest)  The 

bad  news  is  they  do  what  every- 
one else  is  doing.  The  good  news 
is  they  do  it  pretty  well.  This 
metaltema'tive  (the  two  genres 
are  rapidly  becoming  one,  so 
why  not  combine  them?)  Scottish 
band  has  a  great  sense  of  rhythm 
and  syncopates  a  lot  of  their 
.songs.  There's  also  a  good  mix- 
ture of  fast,  aggressive  and 
midtempo  mellower  songs, 
though  the  fa.">ter  ones  are  better. 
Despite  their  homage  to  body 
fluids,  the  album's  first  songs, 
"Sperm."  "Saliva"  and  "Go  To 
Hell,"  are  by  far  the  best. 
"Saliva"  is  a  powerhouse  of  bass 
guitar  that  gives  way  at  times  to  a 
swinging  lead  guitar.  Its  energy 
runs  rings  around  the  pedestrian 
single,  "Buzz,"  which  sounds 
like  everyone  from  Pavement  to 
Weezer. 

Chaos  runs  out  of  ideas  toward 
the  end  and  sounds  indistinguish- 
able from  the^O  other  bands 
released  this  we\k.  The  first  few 
tracks  are  worth  a  spin,  though, 
and  the  later  ones  measure  up  to 
most  of  the  scuz  on  the  radio. 
K.F.    B- 

Haardvark,  Memory  Barge 
(D(iC)  Yet  another  indie  band 
sucked  in  by  DGC's  greedy  <not 
SO)  little  nostrils.  Something  in 
the  rawness,  dissonance  and 
intensity  recalls  Nirvana's 
Bleach,  but  of  course  this  group 


SPONSORED  BY 


n 

M  People  Bizarre  FruK 


has  a  long  way  to  go.  "Fawn,"  the 
opener,  is  fascinating  with  its 
ice-cream  truck  jingle  guitars 
and  haunting- opening  bars.  The 
title  coupled  with  a  chorus  of 
"April  showers  bring  May  flow- 
ers" hints  at  sarcasm  and  anger 
(or  maybe  Bambi??),  and  the 
mention  of  open  sores  again 
recalls  Mr.  Cobain.  It's  one  of 
the  few  CDs  where  you  actually 
want  the  words  included  in  the 
package.  Something  subversive 
under  the  breath  ...  of  course 
some  mystery  is  probably  better. 
Even  their  more  lethargic  and 
sparsely  arranged  songs  suggest 
that  something  is  thriving  inside, 
like  termites  crawling  around  a 
seemingly  empty  piece  of  drift- 
wood. 

Throughout  the  entire  disc 
things  are  mounting  and  congeal- 


ing, then  being  let  go  through  the 
dissipating  breath  of  an  easygo- 
ing .spng,  such  as  "Cry  For  Lyie" 
or  the  indispensible  "Logan." 
The  first  half  squishes  the  second 
like  a  bug  -  the  last  four  songs 
being  more  or  less  irritating  but 
easily  ignored.  K.F.    B 

Saint  Vitus  Die  Healing 
(Hellhound)  The  winds  of 
change  are  blowing  strong  on  the 
metal  scene.  With  the  girls  and 
guitars  era  of  the  '80s  ancient 
history,  the  end  now  also  seems 
at  hand  for  the  speed-oriented 
style  of  recent  years. 

The  emerging  doom  metal 
turns  the  frenzied-pace  philoso- 
phy on  its  head,  preferring  plod- 
ding power  riffs  and  wailing 
vocals.  Although  not  the  guiding 
light  in  this  grim  genre,  Saint 


Vitus  keeps  pace.  Like  a  chloro- 
form-induced loss  of  the  senses, 
Die  Healing  leaves  the  listener  in 
a  hazy  vacuum  of  fear  and  dark- 
ness. Fascinated  with  failings  of 
the  human  psyche  and  humanity 
at  large,  Vitus  paints  a  picture 
discolored  by  discontent  and  dis- 
enchantment. With  the  band's 
oppressive  graveyard  atmosphere 
and  reverberating  rhythms,  tracks 
such  as  "Sloth"  and  "Let  the  End 
Begin"  truly  live  up  to  their 
titles.  There  is  a  major  pitfall  to 
this  slowed-down  style,  however, 
and  Vitus  is  guilty  of  unrelenting 
repetitiveness  within  songs  and 
weak  differentiation  between 
them.  J.S.nB-    ~ 

M  People  Bizarre  Fruit 
(Epic)  Yes  folks,  success  (British 
critical  and  commercial  success, 
that  is)  has  gone  to  their  heads.  - 
From  the  delightful  wordplay  of 
the  new  lyrics,  to  the  name 
checks,  to  Patti  Smith,  Stevie 
Wonder,  Van   Morrison  and 


Marvin  Gaye,  the  band's  strategy 
this  time  around  is  to  open  up  its 
collective  bag  of  tricks  and  prove 
to  the  world  that  it's  not  just 
another  disco  band.  Of  courser 
the  group  nevertheless  is  a  disco 
band,  albeit  the  greatest  one  on 
the  planet.  It  should  go  without 
saying  that  the  programmed  key- 
boards and  tricky  arrangements 
of  amateurs  Mike  Pickering  and 
Paul  Heard  haven't  faltered  since 
the  brilliant  Elegant  Slumming, 
but  they've  become  fuller  and 
more  intricate.  Even  better,  back- 
up singers  Juliet  Roberts, 
Beverly  Skeet,  et  al.  make  their 
presence  known,  the  live  band 


Tounds  more  confident  than  ever 
and  Heather  Small  is  still  the 
best  disco  diva  this  side  of 
Moby's  studio  enclave.  As  one 
line  aptly  puts  it,  your  passport  to 
a  feel  supreme.  M.T.    A- 


Reviews  by  Kristin  Fiore, 
Michael  Tatum  and  John 
Sabatini. 


PdSU 

lUWU 

Moby 

Everything  is  Wrong 

A 

Bad  Brains 

'    God  o1  Love 

A- 

J^  W  .J 

Pavement 

Wowee  Zowee 

A- 

BPfH 

Yo  La  Tengo 

Electr-0-Pura 

A- 

^E^H 

PJ  Harvey 

To  Bring  You  My  Love 

B^ 

^pi^H 

Tank  Girl 

Soundtrack 

B 

K~H 

White  Zombie 

Astro-Creep  2000 ... 

B 

^H^H 

Elton  John 

Made  in  America 

C^ 

^M^H 

Duran  Duran 

Thank  You 

D^ 

^.^^P^ 

All 

Pummel 

D- 

H 

Oionne  Warwicit 

,  Aquarela  Do  Brasil 

F 

^u, / : 

I7#  ijlJei  -lera/  v  ///  / 

I  in  .  iiri  A    fuemmw  III  \  ifi  riMi   I II I  I  I  i.  I  hiiii  i.   i  ii/ii  r  if  if  t»  i  /  ' 


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A  =  Century  Cable      B  =  Channel  Name 


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a  Star 


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Star  Trek  A  Prwate  Lrttle 

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♦  »»'>  "Was^w/te"(1975,  Drama)  Lily  Tornhn  The 
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Marilyn  Kagan 


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Baf]  Religion  (In  Stereo) 


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Evening 
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Unsolved  Mysteries  (In 

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Undbargh's  Great  Race 

!5L 


Talk  Soup 

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Batebsil 
iQht 


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Racing 


Retcue  911  (In  Stereo^  :K. 


Submarines:  Sharks  of 
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Gossip  (R) 


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Law  li  Order  "Torrents  of 

Greed"  (Pad  1  ol  2) 


♦  *'/,  "Family Honeymoon" (\9A6, 
Comedy)  Fred  MacMurray,  Hila  Johnsryi 


'Shadows"  (1960)  A  parentless  black 
family  struggles  Jo  survive  n  New  York 


Larry  KingLiva(R)X 


PolHlcally 
Incorrect 


Russian  TV 


Next  Slap 

151 


Howard 
Slarn  (R) 


Extreme  Games  101 


700  Club  (Left  *\  Progress; 


Prime  Time  (In  Slereo) 


'Men  Don't  re/r(l993.  Drama  Judith  Light  A  man  is 
physically  and  verbally  abused  oy  hn  wile 


I  Dream  of 
Jeannie  _ 

Love  Boat 


Bewitched 


Marcus  Welby,  M  D.  Hell 

l«  Upstairs     

Boxing  Fight  Nwhi  al  Ihe  Great  Western  Forum  From 


I  Love  Lucy 

■K. 


Mary  Tyler 
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marries  longtime  k>ve  Stereo)  X      Bogey  Man" 

**v,  "Mallock  The Coufi Mailiar l)9B7)\jiailxM 
defends  a  tokter  accused  of  murdermg  an  officer 


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llurdeTSfMWrole 


Slarsky  and  Hutch 

. WWF:  Monday  Mght  Raw 

Death  Takes  a  Dtve"  X    J 

Perry  Mason  The  Case  fit  the  Fatal  Framing"  ( 1 992) 
Matoo  defend*  a  man  accused  of  murdering  a  painter 
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a 


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Bob 
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Dick  Van 
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«*'/)  "Clashoflhe  Trfans"  (1981,  fantasy)  Laurence  Olivier,  Harry 
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a 


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a  city  where  citizens  are  kilfed  at  age  30 


Quantum  Leap  (In  Slereo)  [Ma|or  Dad 
X  (in  Stereo) 


♦*V>  "Paradise 
brothers  enter  the 


WJel 

Central(R) 


953" 
Prooram 


Alley"  [)97S)  Sylvester  Staltone  Three 
«  work)  of  professional  wreslHng 


Program 


Home  Shopping  Spree 


hry 
jSpre 


6Z3 


•  ♦   '  Thunder  and 
f1977)'PG' 
iiii-orp. 


iiickay 
Mouae  Club 


Charlie 
Brov/n 

American  Anthem  Tl  986," 
AtchOayfcxd  PG-IT 


*»♦  "fl/(w/ Dare  "'l9fl7)Brur»  Willis  Aicohofhasa 
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Torkeleorta 


7)  A  general  uses  a 
a  botched  attack 


(In  Slereo) 


8inbad()n 
Stereo)  "X 


OceenGirl 

(In  Stereo) 


•♦  'Weekend  at  Berme's  //  (1993, 
Comedy]  Arvkew  McCarthy  'PG'  X 


** 


Ihe  Leanrna  Trm'  (19W)  Kyle  Johnton^^ng 
VA.  a  MKk  Kansas  teen  aqer  leamt  about  life 


I920t. 


A  madman  turns  a 
>eadnougril    PG 


National  Lampoon's  La$l  WesorT"  (1994, 
Comedy)  Corey  Haim   PG  13':sr. 


Avoniae  The  Valentine's 

dance  It  a  near  disaster  X 

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must  evade  the  law  as  he  pursues  a  killer 


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"CIA  II  Target Ale)(a" (\W4 
Lorenzo  Lamas  (In  Slereo) 


*♦♦  "Coma" (1978)  Genevieve  Bufokl  A  doctor 
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wired  to  eipteide  if  *  drops  betow  50  mph  R'  X 


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lorn  between  his  wife  and  na  tover  'R*  3) 

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Daily  Bruin  Arts  &  Entertainment 


Monday,  May  22, 1995    19 


Photo  society  magic  offers  new  iooic  at  worid 


Kerckhoff  exhibit 
shows  there's  more 
than  meets  the  eye 

By  Rodney  Tanaka 

The  Excalibur  Hotel  and  Casino, 
usually  a  fixture  on  the  Las  Vegas 
strip,  has  found  a  new  home:  the  top 
ofJanss  steps.  The  medieval  castle 
towers  over  the  UCLA  landscape, 
^ctourfs^  shroudmg  its  towers  Andr 
spires. 

This  relocation  is  a  creation  of 
Paul  Hemesath,  the  photographer- 
in-chief  of  the  UCLA  Photographic 
Society. 

The  society  presents  its  view  of 
the  world  in  "People,  Places  and 
Things,"  Oil  display  at  the 
KerckhoffArt  Gallery  through  May 
26. 

"The  exhibit  allows  the  variety  of 
what  the  club  has  to  offer  to  shine 
through,"  says  Hemesath.  "Our  club 
has  a  wide  variety  of  interests  as 
well  as  experience." 

The  club  maintains  a  core  group 
of  20  students.  Membership  is  open 
to  anyone  interested  in  photogra- 
phy. Each  member  chose  the  work 
that  they  wanted  to  showcase  in  the 
exhibit. 

Hemesath  chose  photographs 
that  deal  with  darkroom  special 


effects.  Three  of  his  prints  are 
"combinations."  single  prints  taken 
from  two  or  three  negatives.  This 
technique  allowed  the  meeting  of 
Las  Vegas  and  UCLA. 

"Art-wise,  it's  hard  to  work  with 
reality  sometimes  because  you  have 
to  deal  with  the  situation  that  is 
pretty  much  composed  in  front  of 
you,"  Hemesath  says. 

Society  president  Scot  Mollot's 
photographs  depict  his  trip  to  the 
Soviet  Union  during  the  summer 
before  his  freshman  year  at  UCLA. 
The  senior  gained  experTehce~and^ 
.skill  with  a  camera  since  his  trip, 
but  these  photographs  remain  his 
favorite  shots. 

"I  wanted  to  put  these  up  to  show 
that  it  was  not  done  with  high  tech 
equipment  or  any  great  body  of 
knowledge,"  Mollot  says.  "It  was 
just  a  picture  I  took  while  on  vaca- 
tion." 

The  photographs  by  vice  presi- 
dent Mall  Leeg  represent  a  new 
direction  for  him.  His  photographs 
are  h+s  first  attempts  at  printing 
color.  "Guitar  of  the  Rising  Sun" 
was  named  because  the  circular  pat- 
tern on  the  guitar  reminded  Leeg  of 
the^old  Japanese  flag.  The  "River 
Styx,"  depicting  a  fountain  in  Las 
Vegas,  "look(ed)  surreal  when  I 
printed  it,  like  fire  cascading 
down,"  Leeg  says. 

Dr.  Debora  Parks,  faculty  advis- 
er, discovered  a  relationship 


between  two  of  her  photographs 
while  readying  them  for  display. 
The  contrasting  photographs 
"Watering  Hole"  and  "Sunbathing" 
capture  kids  playing  in  mud  and 
adults  laying  out  on  the  beach, 
respectively. 

"The  kids  are  all  together  and 
down  in  the  mud  and  the  adults  are 
separated  and  they  all  have  their 
own  personal  space  around  them," 
Parks  says.  "I  wanted  to  show  the 
diametric  opposition." 

In^"Foul  Play,"  three  boys  rough- 


house  with  toy  guns.  "They  were 
just  playing  in  the  park  one  day 
when  I  saw  them  and  1  don't  think 
they  realized  how  violent  they  were^ 
being,"  Parks  says.  'That  struck  me 
as  being  kind  of  scary  -  that  Ihey 
were  having  so  much  fun  killing 
each  other." 

Parks  and  the  society  members 
are  united  by  their  love  of  photogra- 
phy. The  group  was  formed  last 
year  by  John  Hoffman,  who  has 
since  graduated,  and  Scot  Mollot. 
TTiey  organized  the  club  and  started 
up  the  darkroom  at  Sproul  Hall  with 
the  help  of  Parks.  The  club  now 
meets  every  other  Wednesday  and 
participates  in  camping  trips,  local 
photo  shoots  and  lectures. 

Last  year's  trip  to  Death  Valley 
resulted  in  "Desert  Scapes"  an 
exhibit  currently  on  displ^  al  the 

See  KERCKHOFF,  page  20 


UCLA's  Photographic  Society  presents  "People,  Places  and 
Things"  at  the  KerckhoffArt  Gallery  through  May  26. 


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"Siren  of  the  Nebulas"  by  Robert  Williams*  Williams'  work  will 
be  part  of  the  Lollapalooza  exhibit  "Mean  Art." 


LOLLAPALOOZA 

From  page  17 

fans,  there  will  be  an  exhibition  of 
photographs  taken  from 
Friedman's  new  book,  "Fuck  You 
Heroes."  Friedman's  photos  docu- 
ment the  underground  scene  that 
thrived  in  West  L.A.  between  1976 
and  1991,  right  under  the  child- 
hood noses  of  many  UCLA  stu- 
dents. 

"He's  one  of  the  few  guys  that 
got  it  down,"  says  Stecyk  of 
Friedman,  a  longtime  friend. 
"He's  also  one  of  the  few  guys  that 
reveres  it  ...  I  think  there  wUI  be  a 
lot  more  attention  paid  to  that 
whole  time  -  he's  just  way  out  in 
front  of  the  pack.  His  book  forced 
a  lot  of  people  to  look  at  it  and 
consider  it,  which  is  nice,  becau.se 
unless  you  went  to  the  gigs,  you 
didn't  know,"  says  Stecyk. 

Friedman's  ability  to  "get  it 
down"  stems  from  more  than  just 
talent.  He  shares  the  lifestyle  and 
outlook  of  his  subjects,  many  of 
whom  are  his  friends. 

*The  reason  I  connected  skate- 
boarding and  punk  rock  and  hip 
hop  -  it's  definitely  all  attitude. 
It's  like  a  rebel  youth  lifestyle.  It's 
about  people  just  doing  what  they 
want  to  do,  doing  it  their  own  way, 

"If  you're  going  to  look 
at  the  mainstream  art 

periodicals  ...  and 

museums,  you're  never 

going  to  see  80  percent 

of  what's  going  on  ..." 

Craig  Stecyk 

Lollapalooza  Artist 

not  guided  by  adults,"  says 
Friedman  of  his  work  and  his 
world. 

To  complement  all  of  this  street 
art,  there's  also  a  formal  art  gallery 
with  works  by  Chicano,  African- 
American  and  Caucasian  artists 
from  Los  Angeles  and  San 
Francisco. 

Though  many  in  L.A.  have 
access  to  new  music  and  current 
art,  the  lour  will  bring  them  to 

KERCKHOFF 


audiences  previously  unable  ta 
experience  them. 

"People  (in  smaller  areas)  don't 
have  the  opportunity  to  see  all  of 
tho.se  bands  ...  I  think  part  of  what 
Perry  is  trying  to  do  is  expose  kids 
to  new  things  and  I  think  that's 
very  noble.  And  I  think  that  if  he's 
supporting  Julie  Rico's  gallery  and 
doing  this  whole  thing  so  they  can 
be  exposed  to  new  art,  I  think 


Artwork  by  Robert  Williams. 


that's  great,  and  that's  part  of  why 
I'm  going  to  be  a  part  of  it,"  says 
Friedman. 

All  of  these  diverse  and  ultra- 
current  installations  are  o;ily  .sam- 
ples of  what  is  in  store  for  the 
unsuspecting  masses  at 
Lollapalooza.  Interactive  art, 
portable  junkyards,  aroma  therapy, 
massive  billboards  throughout  the 
grounds  -  the  list  of  exhibits  and 
themes  is  endless.  They  are  all 
connected,  though,  by  their  local 
origins  and  current,  controversial 
themes. 

Rico's  collection  will  introduce 
art  buffs  to  an  entirely  new  genera- 
tion of  talent,  and  will  surprise  and 
delight  those  who  have  always 
considered  art  obscure  and  irrele- 
vant. 

"If  you're  trying  to  learn  about 
music  only  by  watching  MTV, 
good  luck.  And  the  same  thing's 
true  for  art,"  says  Stecyk.  "If 
you're  going  to  look  at  the  main- 
stream art  periodicals,  corporate 
collections  and  museums,  you're 
never  going  to  see  80  percent  of 
what's  going  on  out  there." 

CONCERT  ART:  Lollapalooza 
comes  to  the  Los  Angeles  area 
this  summer.  Glen  Friedman's 
t>ook,  "Fuck  You  Heroes,"  available 
through  2.13.61  Publications  and 
is  in  bookstores  everywhere. 


From  page  19 

Two  Part  Coffee  House  in  Santa 
Monica.  The  club's  trip  last  quar- 
ter to  Las  Vegas  provided  subject 
matter  for  some  photographers  at 
the  Kcrckhoff  cxhibJl^Thc  sight 
of  the  Bxcalibur  on  campus  may 
not  be  the  most  stariling  image  of 
the  UCLA  campus. 

The  photograph  that  greets  visi- 
tors is  titled  "UCLA  Sunrise."  The 
sun  showers  a  crimson  glow  over 
the  silhouettes  of  Royce  Hall  and 


Powell  Library.  Signs  of  construc- 
tion are  nowhere  in  sight. 

■■ 

EXHIBIT:  The  UCLA  Photographic 
Society  exhibit  "People,  Places 
and  Things,"  is  open  through  May 
26  at  the  Kerckhoff  Art  Gallery. 
Sponsored  by  Cultural  Affairs 
Commission.  Reception  Tuesday, 
May  23  from  6-8  p.m.  Admission  is 
free.  For  more  info  call  C3>.  Debora 
Parks  at  (310)  794-3842. 


.   Daily  Bruin  Classified 


Monday,  May  22, 1995    21 


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advertisement  not  meeting  the  standards  of  the  Daily  Bruin. 

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How  to  write  a  good  ad 


The  ASUCLA  ConMnunicatiOflS  Board  tuNy  supports  ttw  University  d«  CaMornta  s  policy  on 
nondiscrtminatkm  No  medium  shall  accept  advenisements  which  present  persons  ol  any  ongm 
race,  rehgion,  sex,  or  sexual  orientation  in  a  demeaning  way  or  imply  that  they  are  limMed  to 
positions.  capabMitiai.  roles  or  sUtus  m  society  Neither  the  Daily  Brum  nor  the  ASUCLA 
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represented  In  this  issue  Any  person  believing  that  an  advertisement  in  this  issue  violated  the 
Board's  poNcy  on  nondiscrimination  stated  herein  should  communicate  compUints  in  writing  lo 
the  Business  Manager.  Daily  Brum.  225  Kerckhotl  Hall,  308  Westwood  Ptaa,  Los  Angeles,  CA 
90024  for  assistance  with  housing  discrimination  problems,  call  the  UCLA  Housing  Ollice  at 
(310)  825-4271  or  call  the  Weslside  Fair  Housing  Office  at  (310)  4;'S-96/1 


1.  Start  your  ad  with  tfie  merchandise  your  are  selling.  This  makes  it  easier  for  readers  to  quickly  scan 
the  ads  and  locate  your  item(s). 

2.  Always  include  the  price  of  the  item  you  are  selling.  Many  classified  readers  simply  do  not  respond 
to  ads  without  prices. 


3.  Avoid  abbreviations  --  make  your  ad  easy  for  readers  to  understand. 

4.  Place  yourself  in  the  reader's  position.  Ask  what  you'd  like  to  know  about  the  merchandise, 
and  include  that  in  the  ad.  Include  information  such  as  brand  names,  colors,  and  other  specific 
descriptions.,  ^     • 


1   Campus  Happenings 


•LAUGH  FOR  A  CAUSE/  $7.50/pen6n. 
Comedy  Out  tickeU,  Monday- S/22,  8pm. 
Bruin  Bcllct  raiw  $S  for  Heart-of-l.M  Angela 
Youfh-Ccnter.  Michelle.  825-91 74. 


1  Campus  Happenings 


Alcoholics  Anonynnous 

MoTi  Dtecussion,  FrI  Step  StucJy,  AU  3525 

Thurs.  Book  Study,  AU  3525 
ruet  ond  Wed.  DItcuttkxi.  Dental  A-3'029 

Allttmes  12:10-l:00pm 

for  atcohoUcs  or  Indlvlckjals  who  hav0  a 

drtnklriQ  probtem.  ■ 


3  Campus  Recruitment 


3  Campus  Recruitment 


4  Financial  Aid 


Cuh  for  college.  900,000  grants  available. 
No  repayments,  EVER.  Qualify  immediately. 
1-800-243-2435. 


COLLEGE  MONEY  GUARANTEED!  IOC's  of 
miltione  in  (cholarihlpc,  grar>ts,  aid  &  private 
(und«.  Be  smart,  apply  now.  1-800-549-2400 
ext0  91O1. 


3  Campus  Recruitment 


3  Campus  Recruitment 


3  Campus  Recruitment 


Education 


Psychology 


Hum  an  M.A.  in  ISychoIo.i^y  or 
Clinical  P.sycliolo^y  with  an 
cmpha.si.s  in  Maniai'c'  and  I'amily  ^ 
Tlirraj)y  al  local  ions  in  U)s  An^clcs, 
I'juino,  ii-vinc,  and  Malihii. 

An  MA.  in  IxliKalion,  M.S.  in 
Adniini.slralion,  iMid  teaching  and 
administrative  credentials  are  al.so 
•available.         '^■^ —  - 

l'<Kr  (I  hroi  htirc  and  (tlf/f/icrHion. 
call  (<S()())  iS.S.S-^i,Si'J /(,r psycholot^w 
or  (SOO)  yi7  i^'IV  for  ctlncation' 


PEPPERDINE   UNIVERSITY 

(iKADUAriiSCillOOLOl   I'DIJCATION  AND  PSYCIIOIXK.Y 


UNIVERSITY Pt  LA  VERNE 


COLLEGE  OF  LAW 

Quality  Legal  Education  „ 


.• 


ENTRY 
LEVEL 


MANAGEMENT 
COLLEGE  GRADS 
STEP  UP  TO  A 

PROFESSIONAL  CAREER 


SALES/MANAGEMENT  TRAINEE 

$25,000 

lii.Nl.  Exvl^xvIoEa)  One  ofAiiferica'a  faBtost  growing  and 
largest  privately  hold  companiea  with  over  200  ofTioea  throughout 
the  aouthland,  sooki  bright,  motivated  people  to  share  in  our 
■uooBM.  You  11  need: 

Q  BS/BA  DEGREE 
Q  Strong  Communication  Skills 
Q  Retail/Management/Sales  Experience  a  plus 
Q  The  Desire  to  pursue  a  career  in  general 
management 

THE  CHALLENGE:  YouII  ie«m  aii  .tpecu  or 

running  a  buiiineee,  including  aalca,  marketing,  personnel 
management,  ai^d  more,  while  ei\joying  full  pay  and  benofitat 

THE  REWARD:  Fir«t  year  earnings  to  $26K. 
Outstanding  candidates  reach  management  level  within  9  months 
to  1  1/2  ytLn,  earning  |30K  -  $36K  k  $36K  -  $56K  within  2  -  2  ^2 
years. 

THE  CAREER:  Promotbns  ara  100%  from  within  based 
on  Individual  performance. 


7  Good  Deals 


CRAOUATION  ANNOUNCEMENTS  ANO 
INVITATIONS  much  cheaper  than  UClA'i 
pric«...Pervir>alized,  25  for  S32.80,  100  for 
$45.90.  LargfC  selection,  rush  orders  wcl- 
corT>e.  Eleitant  Invitations.  310-652-6550.  • 
INSURANCE  WARI  WE'LL  BEAT  ANYONES 
price  or  don't  want  your  business.  Tickets, 
accidents,  student/rtaff  discounts.  Request 
the 'Bruin  Plan.'  310-777-881  7  or  21 3-873- 
3303. 


— JURIS  DOCTOR  PROGRAM 

•  Accredited  by  the  C^alifornia  (>)mmittee 
of  Bar  Examiners 

•  Innovative  &  Supportive  hnvironnient 
-•    FuHTime,  Part  Time,  Day/Evening 

Classes 

•  Financial  Aid  ik  Scholarshifi.s  Available 

—  PARAIJ'GAL  PROGRAMS  ALSO  OFFKRKI)- 
•  Certificate        •  AS/BS  Degrees 
FOR  INFORMATION  CALL: 

San  Fernando  Valley  Campus  I^  Verne  Campus 

5445  Balboa  Hive.  1950  ircl  Street 

.    Fntino,  CA  91316  La  Ve^ui/^  A  9 1 750 

(818)981-4529         "  (909)596-1848 


The  University  ori-a  Verne  is  accredited  by  the  Western 
Asswiation  orS(h<H»ls-;tnd  (]«)llej»es 


7  Good  Deals 


THIS  WEEK  ONLY! 


Free  Latex  Condoms 

Ultra  Sensitive,  Lubed.  Ribbed. 
Amazing  offer    How  to  get  60  free 

condoms  everylime  you  need  it 
Send  SASE  for  free  info  to;  Adam's 
&  Co     Po  Box  13^2  LA,  CA  90078 

Call  24hrs.  info  (310)  288-3653 


ALL  books  in  stocic 

Economics.  Business, 

General  Hea  tti  and 

Nutrition 


Put  your  reputation 
on  the  line. 


Classified  Line 
825-2221 


Daily  Bruin 


7  Good  Deals 


Dental  Exam  &  Cleaning 

"All  Students  &  Faculty  Members  are  welcome" 
First  time  introductory  oHer  with  this  roupon 


•^  39.00 


U:  (310)475^5598 


I  ■    .Ncttiury  X  Ray  imp  lo  4> 
I  •   Oral  CMWWr  VT*«iilnc 

Hm  In  N*  «M*r>g  m  inntnf  1t*m  witf< 


4«ntal  npcritiic* 

»•  nfftr  NIlTtHls  fHId* 

(Uufhinll**) 

f.tpitjn  h  IK  95 


V\  (•    nmln  ijrrtntiluJ  v')mili".sl 

•  .^'l  I  liJiir  I  nil  r|«  III  II   irr-Mty 

•  M«-'lt-Cxil  \MiaI  liiMinirio  I  '|.in%  \iiiilf'l 

9 


$  98.00  ,;W. 

I  •  Wt  offtr  mo*4 
rfflrirnl  MtM-hing 
iiytltm 
I*  («mpM*Kit  (twovlillil 

hupirnh  1H45 


VfSA 


1(520  Wp»lwc*)rl  IjIvJ.,  Wp*I  I  i)\  r\n<^ews,  Lflwipn  WtUhir*'  \  .j(inl<i  MoriMd  (I  r»'«'  I  Virlirvj  in  l^'pcir) 


INTERESTED?  CALL  JILL 

EIXnCRPRISE 

TEL/  (31 0)  827-7239 


9  Miscellanebus 


ALPHA  DELTA  CHI 

h  recruiting  CKriitian  women  for  torority 
mcmberthip.  If  ir>tere«(ed,  call  Tracy,  31(i 
320^930  or  Charyll,  3ia471-227S. 


JOHN  LENNON 

A  phikMOphtcal  enquiry  \iilo  hit  life,  work, 
and  influcrKC.  9week  coun*  comm«f>cir>g 
i^^S.  Kinlco't  confarerxV  room,  TorrarK*. 
310.}7»4)SJ6.  ^v 


10  Personal 


**THi    DAILY    IRUIN    ASSUMfS    NO    RE 
SPONSIBIIITY     FOR     ADVERTISERS'      OR 
CUSTOMERS'  EXPERIENCES  CONCERNING 

ADS  IN  THE  PERSONALS  ttCTION. 

MIALTHY  ALTERNATIVE  TO  BAR  SCLNf. 
BrowM  through  pertpertive  daletl  1-900- 
S62  7000  cxt.  6739.  $2.99/mir>..  Mou  be 
ISyn.  ProcallCo.   602-9S4  7420. 

WITNESSES 

BUS  ACCItXNT  VICTIM  teeki  witneMet. 
1(y24^4,  3pm,  al  Hllgard/Lecontc.  S4  yr-old 
Aaian  «iroman,  wearing  green  coal,  (ell,  irv 
jurcd  KefMlf  on  Bu*  2 1 .  If  you  have  any  Info, 
picaac  call  Ylnn,  213-73S-4422. 


10  Personal 


V  Happy  21st  Birthday,  ▼ 
J  lenl  5 

^P  Oanny  ^F 

^     Your  Lir  Ones,   Oair^g  &  «a 


VVNTED:  100  PEOPLE 

LoM  1029  ItM.  in  30  day*  and  earn  SSS  do- 
lr«  IL  100%  RuaranCM.  QtU  310-281-0820. 


22     Monday,  May  22, 1995 


Daily  Bruin  Classified 


12  Research  Subjects 


12  Research  Subjects 


12  Research  Subjects 


Feeling  depressed,  sad  or  hofjeless?  Lost 

interest  or  energy? 
Sleeping  too  much 
or  too  little?  Crying 
frequently? 
Participants  18  to  65 

needed  for  medical  research  study. 

Qualified  volunteers  may  be  compensated 


CALIFORNIA 


PLEASE      CALL 


1  -800-854-3902 


r. 


NERVOUS?  ANXIOUS? 
FEARFUL?  WORRIED? 

Research  volunteers  between  the  ages  of  18  and  65 

experiencing  these  symptoms  for  at  least  1  month  and 

in  relatively  good  health  are  needed.  Volunteers  will 

receive  a  brief  exam  in  order  to  determine  eligibility. 

Qualified  volunteers  receive  free  basic  physical 

exam/lab  test  and  compensation  up  to  $495.^. 


California!  CLiNiCAL  TRiALsl 


MEDICAL  GROUP 

Please  call  1-800-854-3902 


BEOWtrriNC  BOVS  7.)^  yr*.  and  their  fa- 
rnihc*  needed  for  UCIA  research  project. 
SubjccJs  w\U  receive  $20  ind  a  free  dcvclof>- 
mentaj  evaluation.  310-8250392.    

COUPLES  NEEDED 

Research  on  perjonalily,  compatabilily.  Free 
phone  conicihalion  offered  regarding  dynam- 
ict  of  relationship  based  on  lest  results.  Ccri 
310  281  6533. 

DEPRESSED??        / 

ANO  A  STUfJENT  OVtK  20  YtARS?  Earn 
$20  in  2-hour  study  on  relationship  bct¥vcen 
physiological  activity  and  irnagery.  Call  )can, 
310^250252. 

HYPERACTIVE  BOYS  with  attentional  prob- 
lems 7-11  yr»,  needed  for  UCLA  research 
project.  Receive  $20  and  a  free  dcvelopfT>cn- 
tal-evaluation.  310-825-0392. 


Volunteers  needed  for  back 

nju»cle  test  with  no  history  of 

back  injury  or  pain 

CulverGty,  call  (310)  559-5500 


Licensed  Psychotherapist  working  on  dodor- 
al-diMertation  inlcretted  in  individuals  who 
experienced  childhood  abuse  and  neglect. 
Aduh-children  of  alcoholict,  eating  disorders, 
victims  of  incest,  encouraged  to  pwlicipatc. 
Fre«  consultation  and  evaluation.  Volcemail 

310284  4881,  office  213  658-7213. 

NORMAL  HEALTHY  BOYS  7  11  yrs,  and 
their  families  needed  for  UCLA  research  pro- 
ject Receive  $20  and  have  a  scientific  le»n- 
inggxp>rief>ce.  310  825  0392. 

Psychology  Study 

Adult  children  of  psychotherapists,  physi 
cians,  health  professionals,  clergy,  teachers, 
wanted  for  brief  study.  25  years^^.  Comperv 
satitxi.  Call  Mike,  818-980  04  50. 

SMOKERS  STUDY 

'frt  gpod  health,  18-55,  wanted  fof  ifT>f>king 
cessation  using  (ood  supplemenU  All  partic- 
ipants receive  free  treatment  with  nicotine 
gum.  Call  3ia824-6671. 

VOLUNTEERS   NEEDED  FOR   cardiac  mag 

netic  resonance  imaging  research.  $in^r  (4 
hours  max.).  Call  310  824  6714  from  8am- 
4pm  or  pane  3ia777  1 719f . 


15  Wanted 


GRADTIX 

Graduation  TickHs  Needed.  Social  Sciences 
Ceremony  at  Pauley  on  ^1 8.  Needed  for  lots 
of  relatives.  Willing  to  pay.  21 3-734-4568. 


16  Lost  and  Found 


FOUND,  ON  MAY  8TH,  Black  male  puf>py 
w/collar  in  parking  lot  14.  310-206-5657.     • 

FOUND.  Set  of  keys.  Found  r»ear  Gaylcy  and 
Wcybum  on  May  7,  199S.  Call  3ia20e- 
1865  to  claim. 


19  Sperm/Egg  donors 


ICG  DONORS  NEEDED,  ages  20-32,  for  in- 
fertile couples.  Gerwrous  compemation. 
Leave  name,  address,  telephone  number  for 
information  and  application.  310-273-4827. 
EGG  fX>NO«S  NEEDED.  All  info  connden- 
tial.  Please  call  3ia285  0333. 

EGG  CXDNORS  NEEDED:  Healthy  females 
between  21-34years  old  w/mcdical  in- 
surance. Payrrnrnt  of  $2200  for  medical  pro- 
cess. Mirna  Navas  3ia829-6782,  Monday- 
FridaV. . 

Please  help  infertile  Japanese-American.  Will 
pay  medical  e>ipenses  and  $2,500  to 
Japanese,  Korean,  or  Chinese  egg  donor. 
Grad  sludcnU  call  (213)765-5300.  Use  code 
BH. 

SPERM  DONORS  needed  for  anonymous 
donor  program  al  orw  of  the  largest  ipcrm 
banks  in  the  country,  earn  up  to  $42(Vmo.  if 
qualified.  Contact  Heidi  at  the  California 
Cryobank  3ia443-S244.  ext  24. 


22  Health  Services 


ALONE  STRESSCD-OVERWHELMED.       Sup 
portive  coumeling.  Confidential.  Individuals, 
couples,  groups.  Adjacent  to  campus.  Carole 
Chaiin  MA,  MfCC.  310-289  4643. 

BODY  SCULPTING 

3  TO  5  TIMES  BfTTER  Ht.SULTS  over  other 
productsi  Cre^l  tasting,  advanced  nutritional 
beverages.  Call  lodayl  818-594  3358. 

DEPKISSK-)N<  STKESS/  RELATIONSHIP 
PROBLEMSf  PARENTING  ISSUES/  Individu- 
al, couple,  family  therapy  (or  adulu,  adoles- 
cents, children.  1 9  years  clinical  exper ierKX. 
Accept  most  managed  care  arwj  ir>surance 
plans.  Reasonable  rates.  Westwood  Village 
Steven  Cherman,  L.C.S.W.  M.f.C.C.  3ia 
8379277. 


22  Healtti  Services 


LuCia 

Electrolysis- &  Sklncare 


Pemajieat  Ib&'  Remoral 
Buropcaa  PacUJa  •  WlBxlag 

3Bj   208-8193   ■ 

1»S1  WMtwood  B1t4.    WMtwood 

(1  lUk.  South  of  SiUIta  Mon<>al  MlvcD 


Are  you  tired  of  Paying  High 
Prices  for  Unwanted  Hair? 


Call  Laydays  ThctroCysis 

•  Latest  Method  •  Disposable 
Probe  •  Pennanent  Makeup  • 


Lai/ Ill's  'Licet roll/sis 

3  I  O  - -I  7  3  -  S  •>  7  •> 


IMPROVE  MEMORY... 

mental  clarity,  physlcfl  stamina,  digestion. 
May  control  itresa,  aradety,  RMS,  depression. 
All  natural,  organic.  30-day  guar^ilae. 
Call  1  -«0a927-2527K.2734. 


PSYCHOTHERAPY 

aiNICAL  PSYCHOLOGIST  (psy140e2) 
trained  at  UCLA  offers  timc-llmilcd  psycho- 
therapy focused  on  renrwvir>g  blocks  to  aca- 
demic and  work  efficiency,  and  positive  rela- 
tionships. Ideal  for  studenU  and  faculty  high- 
ly motivated  to  change.  Sliding  scale.  310- 
273-3864. 

SENSUAL  MASSAGE 

S20  SPECIAL  FOR  WOMEN  ONLY.  Relaxing 
full  body,  tentual  massage  by  kalian  mvi. 
Comfortable  atmosphere.  310  479  8434. 


22  Health  Services 


STUDENT  RATES 

Psychotherap)t^coun*ellng  by  Bruin  alum. 
Couples-- iryihriduals.  Call  (or  free  corwuha- 
tlon.  Sliding  scale.  Lii  Could.  IMF#17869. 
Arlen  Rin^  Ph.D.  -tuperviiar,  PSY#8070. 
310-S78-S9S7;  pver,  310-572-4092.  Con- 
venient WcsAMood  location. 


30  Help  Wanted 


23  Beauty  Services 


SUPER  1  NAILS 

Student  discount  wAXlA  10.  173S  West- 
wood  Blvd.  310-478-2702.  Open  7  days  a 
week.  Free  paikinK  urtdet  Rom. 


30  Help  Wanted 


MODELS  NEEDED 

PtTFTE  AND  TALL,'men  wwi  women.  Earn 
$1  SOCVday,  fashion  clienU  include  Benetton. 
No  experience  necewary.  3 10-S5 1-1823. 

$7/hour  +  BONUS 

Flexible  hours,  UCLA  Annual  Fund.  Call, 
310-794-0277. 

ACCOUNTING 

Crowing  company  seeks  individual  wA>ack- 
gourv^major  in  accounting.  Invoicing,  track- 
ing of  accounts  payabk/^eivable.  Flexible 
hours/Work-at-home  poikibilty.  Pay  negoti- 
able.   David,  1  -800-870-6696. 

ACTORS/MODELS.  Auditiora  by  ^>point- 
ments  only.  For  conwncrciais,  (\\rr»,  print  ads. 
Air  types/ages  needed.  No  experience  neces- 
sary.  No  fee.  Ima)y,  818-222-9091 . 

ADULT  MALE.  RESPONSIBLE,  strong  refer- 
erKXs  to  provide  personal  care  to  disabled 
man.  1 -hour/day.  weekdayi/alterrute  wee- 
Icends.  Westvvood.  Will  Uain.  $250fmoHlh. 
310475-5209. 

AIDE  NEEDED  FOR 
7-Y/O  AUTISTIC  BOY 

ASSISTANCE  NEEDED  w/daily  living,  be- 
havior, general  cognitive  skills.  Full-time  job. 
Aide  will  work  on  team  w/other  profeuion- 
als.  Experience  workir>g  w/Autistic  Popula- 
tion preferred.  Perfect  position  if  ir«erested  in 
Special  Education.  Parents  are  a  State  ap- 
proved Nort-Public  AgferKy  (or  Autism.  Staff 
members  have  20>  yean  experience.  CorMact 
310-542-4146. 

ALASKA  JOBS! 

ALASKAN  FISHERY  PARKS  AND  TOURIST 
RESORTS  HIRING,  earn  great  $$S  this  sum- 
mer, free  transportation,  room,  board,  get  all 
the  optionsi  Call  SEI  919-490-8629. 

ALASKA  JOBS  Earn  up  to  $6,00QAnonth  in 
the  fishing  irvjustry.  Free  transportation. 
Room  and  Board.  MaleA'emale.  No  experi- 
ence neceuarv.  310-285-0085.  EXT  A9240. 


SUMMER  JOBS 

Fine  High  Sierra  Family 
Resort  at  cool  7500' 
tfeeks  live-in  counselors 
(20up)  to  TEACH: 

•  Western  Equitation  (2) 

•  Canoeing  (1) 

•  Sailing  ( 1 )  ' 

•  Pre -School  exp  to  work 

with  children  2-6  yrs  (4) 

•  Swimming  +  Lifeguard  (2) 

•  Adult  Crafts  &  Jewelry  (1) 

800-22  7-9966 

Call  Daily  or  Sundays 
Dates:   Jun  15  to  Sept  7,  1995 


BALLOONISTS— 

Party  decorators,  singing  delhrery  drivers,  ar- 
tists, party-planning  assistants  needed  at  Bal- 
loon Celebrations.  Fast-paced,  creative  envi- 
ronment 10920  LeConte,  Westwood.  310- 
206-1180. 

BARTENDER  TRAINEES.  Earn  $10a$200  da- 
ily. No  expcrierKe  necessary.  National  Bar- 
tenders. 213-380-3200.  310-558-0608,  818- 
994-8100.  

BLENDING/SALES- 

Now  hiring  crew.  Smoothie  King.  PT^T. 
1 1 740  San  Vicente  BlvdA^orham.  Excellent 
opportunity  (or  studenUI  Call  after  5pm. 
310-826-3050.  EOE. 

BOOKKEEPER  E/C 

Full  lime,  good  w/people.  Lotus  1-2-3.  prop- 
erty management  experience  helpful.  Ber>e- 
fits.  Send  Resume  to  M.H.F.  Mgmt.  Co.,  225 
No.  Crescent  Drive,  Beverly  HlMs,  CA  90210. 

CAMP  COUNSELORS 

8-WEEK  BEACH  ORIENTED  DAY  CAMP 
PROGRAM;  2-WEEK  HIGH  SIERRA  CAMP- 
OUT.  MINIMUM  AGE  21.  EXPERIENCED 
W/CHILDREN,WATER  SPORTS.  $320AVEEK. 
310-^26-7000.  

CAMP  COUNSELORS 

CAMP  HIGHLANDS  in  Pacific  Palisades. 
June  26-September  1.  M-f.  9:30anv2:30pm. 
Experience  with  children  beneHcial.  iO/hr. 
Call  Andrew  or  Kurt  310-459-4083. 

CAMP  COUNSELORS.  Westwood  recreation 
complex  is  seeking  camp  counselors  (or 
children,  ages  5-12.  Must  be  18-yearvold, 
experience  preferred,  but  not  required. 
$5.69/hr,  32  hriAvk.  July3-Scpiember1.  Call 
Betsy  Spina  at  310-473^3610. 


NEW  FACES  NEEDED  NOW 

•  For  TV  Commercials 

•  Movtes 

•  Catalogs 

•  Videos 

call  immertiaffHy 

(310)659-4855 


ALASKA  SUMMER  EMPlOtMENT.  Fishing 
Industry.  Earn  to  S3.000-$6.00af/month 
plus  benefits.  Maie^cmale.  No  experience 
necessary.  206-545-4155  ext  A59346. 

APARTMENT  ASSISTANT  MANAGER.  $200 
deduction  from  rent.  10416  Irerte  St  Call 
21 3-387-5530.  Paner  21 3-828-91 77. 

ASIAN  FEMALES 

Shampoo  companies  (Sebastian)  nted  asian 
female  hair  models.  All-ages/all  heighu  okayl 
No  experience  necei«ary.  Top  payl  Call  free 
1  -800-959-9301 . 

ASSISTANT 

for  muktt  research  firm.  Full-timVpart-lime. 
Exposure  to  many  irwJustrica,  good  telephone 
skills  needed.  Call  9am-10pm  daily,  Mrs. 
Rost  310-391-7232. 

ASSISTANT  P/r.  Research,  typing  fiiini^  er- 
rands.  MUST  KNOW  WORD/WORD  PER- 
FECT; lor  real  estate  investor  in  M  Air.  Fax 

resume  310-471-4885. 

ASSISTANT,  P/T  momin^i  for  computer 
school  in  Westwood.  Need  computer  and 
typing  skills,  bookkeeping  and  good  English. 
S9/hr.  310^470^8600. 

Assistant  to  Entertain- 
ment &  Sports 
Attorney 

In  Century  City  is  sought  to  har>dle  varied 
secretarial  duties.  Typing  filing,  and  phor^et. 
Excellent  communicatiorVphone  skills  a 
must.  LigN  dictation  and  bookkeeping.  1  -2 
years  experience  Ideal.  20-22kV  P'*^  bonus. 
Mult  be  highly  organized,  detail  oriented, 
conscientious  and  computer  literate.  Fax  re- 
sume and  salary  history  to:  Steve  Linett  at 
310-28^1728. 


ATHLETIC/BOYISH  MALE  MODUS.  Earn 
$1  5a$300  PER  HOUR.  Surfer,  student,  jock 
types.  Must  be  18-24,  clean-shaven  face,  lit- 
ilc/no  chest  hair.  Playgirl-style  magazines, 
videos.  Nudity  required.  Highest  $$S.  Imme- 
diate payl  Beginners  welcorT>e.  Brad.  310- 
392-4248.  

BABYSITTER  P/T  WANTED  FOR  "95  FALL. 

Winter,  Spring  quarters.  4-  6  hours  per  day. 
T.  Th.  Good  pay.  great  kM.  Call  lor  daUils. 
leave  meiaaRe  at  21 3-656-3841 . 


CAREER 
MINDED 

ECOLCX:iCALLY  SOUND  product  brokeraffi' 
seeks  out^ing  career-oriented  individual  to 
help  fill  key  er>try-level  positions  w/potential 
for   managrnwnt.    Attitude    more    important 
than  experience.  818-447-0331. 


CASHIER/COFFEE  MAKER.  PA.  FA  help 
wanted  for  coffee  cart.  Westwood  location, 
experience  a  plus.  Applications  uken  11- 
1pm  Saturday  S/20,  12-2pm  Sunday  5/21. 
818-810-8812. 

CASHIERS 

EOR  HOLLYWOOD  BOWL  RESTAURANT, 
nights  June  3rd-end  of  September.  4-6 
nighH^«ek.  Previous  cashiering  preferred. 
SS.lSfhour  +gratuity.  213-851-3588  for  ap- 
plication. 


CASTING  IMMEDIATELYI  Extras  needed  for 
feature  filnw.  convnercials,  and  music  videos. 
Earn  up  to  $240  per  dayl  No  experience 
needed.  Work  guaranteed!  Call  today  213- 
851-6102. 

CHEMIST  FOR  Q.A. 

FT  position  open  w/in  vitro  mfg.  comparry  & 
requires  Bachelor  degrt*  in  natural  scierKes. 
Please  fax  resume,  work  experience  w^lary 
history  to  Human  Resources  310-453-3050. 
You  will  be  contacted  only  if  you  are  being 
considered  for  the  position. 

CLIENT  OPER.  MNGR 

Professionals  resporwible  for  direct  manage- 
ment of  staff,  all  faceU  of  medical  billing,  col- 
lectionf.  Mutt  haw  professiorul  demeanor, 
ability  to  meet  deadlines,  excellent  commu- 
nication, problem  -solving  skills.  Should  have 
3+  years  medical  accounu  receivable  marv 
agement  experience,  knowlcdft  of  CPT  and 
K:0-9  diagnosis  coding.  Positions  based  In 
LA.  Fax  resume  to  3ia390-8030  or  call  310- 
91 5-8029.  Medaphis  Physician  Services  Cor- 
poration. 

CLIENT  SERV.  MNGR 

Professionals  who  enjoy  servicing  physicl»«. 
Must  have  3-f  years  experience  In  medical 
management,  ability  to  interact  w/physlclans; 
extensive  knowledge  of  CPT  &  K:D-9  diagno- 
sis coding,  managed  care,  capitation,  FFS, 
medical  terminology,  reinr>burserT>ent  pro- 
cessing. Excellent  comnrtunication,  analytical 
&  spreadsheet  skills.  Sonw  travel  required. 
Positions  based  in  LA,  San  Bernadino.  Fax  re- 
sume to  3ia39a8030  or  call  310^91  5  8029. 
Medaphis  Physician  Services  Corporation. 

COMMUNITY  SERVKIE  OfFKTER  (CSO)  Pro- 
grams are  hiring  for  fall  quarter.  Think  ahead, 
apply  now.  15  hrs.  min.  flexible  schedule. 
$6.16  to  start,  $6.63  regular  pay.  Must  be 
full-time  UCLA  Hudem.  Call  310-825-21 48. 

COPYWRITERS! 

WE  NEED  a  sharp  business  rescarcherAvriter 
w/grcat  writing  skills  to  write  Make  Money  at 
Home  reporta.  Recorded  info:  310.358-7199. 


r 


Daily  Bruin  Classified 


iMonday,  IMay  22, 1995    23 


30  Help  Wanted 


COUNSaORS.  SWIM.  ARTS.  GYM.  VkiM, 
Nature,  Ropes,  and  Riding  kntructon  Need- 
ed by  WIA  Day  Canf»p.  Work  w/chitdrert, 
have  fun,  and  earn  money  this  summer. 
Muit  be  retporvlble,  energetic.  «id  enjoy 
working  w/chlldren.  Call  310-472-7474. 

COUNTER  PERSON-FA-PA  K5D  AVAILABLE 
at  Dryclean  Expresa.  Apply  in  person.  2461 
Santa  Monica  Blvd.  SanU  Monica,  90404. 
310-82S-9592. 

CRUISE  SHIPS  &  VACATKDN  RESORTS  HIR- 
INGI  Earn  up  to  $2.200+/month.  WoHd  trav- 
el. FA  and  seasonal  employment.  No  experi- 
ence neccMary.  Call  310-271-4147,  EXT 
C924. 


CRUISE     SHIPS     HiRII^.     Earn     up    to 
$2.00O4^/month.   World  travel.  Seasonal  and 
_  full-time  posKlont.    No  exp  necefiary.   For 
Info,  call  T-20^S4-0468ext.  C59346. 

CRUISE  SHIPS! 

EARN  BIG  $$$  ♦  FREE  WORLD  TRAVELI 
(Caribbean,  Europe,  Hawaii,  etc)  Sum- 
merA'crmartent,    no    experlcftce    ncoesaary. 

Guide.  919-929-4398  extC1067. 

DANCERS  EXOTK:  WANTEDI  New  club  Is 
looking  for  outgoing,  attracthre  girls.  Dvicars 
average  $25(WhlA  and  up.  Iftf,  no  experl- 
ence  necessary.  Call  81 8-76S-7739. 

DAY  CAMPS 

serving  Conejo  and  San  Fernando  Valleyt, 
Simi.  Camarilfo.  and  Maiibu  seek  fun  caring 
counselors  ar>d  special  instrudon  for  nature, 
gym,  hortebadc  ridlrw,  flshin|^alin^  rafts, 
■wintming,  sports  aiding  ropes  course  and 
more.  Now  Interviewing  818-865-6263. 

DRIVER 

AND  COAOVCOMPANION.  Approx.  3- 
6pm,  Tues-Fri.  IO-6pm.  S^urday  (Varies 
greatly).  Clean  DMV,  insurance,  refs,  sense  o( 
humor,  reliable.  818-789-7907. 

EARN  $500-$2500 

on  your  rtext  casirto  tripl  FREE  report  Write 
to:  Casino  Report.  P.O.  Box  571961  Tvzana. 
CA91357. 

EARN  UP  TO  SICVHR  cle»>lng  houses  and 
offices.  Tons  of  work.  Call  today  and  go  to 
work  this  week.  Full  arxi  part-tini>e  work. 
Flexible  schedule.  Work  in  your  area.  Car 
necessary.  Call  today  at  310-453-181 7. 

EASY  MONEY! 

Driver  (or  1995-1996  lo  pick-up  children 
from  local  school.  Mortday-Friday  altenxxms. 
flexible  hours.  Reliable,  own  car,  insurance. 
SS-SIQ^wur.  310-275-1835. 

EVENT  STAFF 

EVENT  STAFF  FOR  CONCERTS,  sports,  and 
special  events.  PA.  Work  arourtd  your  acade- 
mic/athletic  schedules.  818-885-7338. 

EXCITING  JOB 

HOUSEKEEPER  wwiled.  SM  house.  Charming 
family  w/pets.  Requirenr>ents»dremely  effi- 
cient, good  driver  w/car.  Full-timersummer. 
part-tinrw:school  year.  Salary  negotiable.  213- 
525-1341. 

FITNESS 
ENTHUSIAST 

HealtlVnutrition  co.  seeks  entry  level/mgr. 
position.  Attitude  more  importvit  than  ex- 
perience. %i-SfiOO/rrm.  potential.  Call  818- 
447-7455  for  appointment 

FRONT  DESK  STAFF.  Westwood  Pacific 
Hotel.  32-40  hounAwk.  S8Aw.  Customer  serv- 
ice expcrierKe  a  must  Apply  at:  1 1 250  Santa 
Monica  BKrd. 

FT-GETTY  TRUST 

Position  open  for  a  resourceful,  motivated, 
and  responsible  irwiividual  with  2-3years 
busirwss  experience.  Duties  Irtcluded  a/o, 
trackirig  and  monitoring  consUudion  costs, 
preparing  contracts,  and  special  projects. 
Proficier>cy  in  Excel  required,  strong  aptitude 
in  microproceuir^  preferred.  Servi  resume 
by  May  31st  to:  1>»e  J.  Paul  Getty  Trust,  c/o 
Human  Resources  -  BPO,  401  Wilshire  Blvd. 
>  #900.  Santa  Monica,  CA  90401 .  No  phone 
calls  please. 

GENERAL  OFFICE 

K  you're  a  positive,  erwrgetic.  arxl  organized 
person  who  enjoys  working  with  people,  we 
have  an  ejacellent  opportunity  for  you.  We're 
a  growing  company  with  room  for  adv»>ce- 
mer4.  Casual,  dyrumic  erwirorwnent  Pay 
arMi  bcrwfhi  open  for  discuasion.  Call  Susan 
at  310-453-1817. 

GENERAL  OFFICE 

PART-TIME.  Light  typing  filing,  xeroxing, 
mailing.  M-F,1-5pm.  Must  speak  fluent  Eng- 
lish. Wlhhire  Blvd.  Temple.  Call  Bctll,  213- 
388-2401  orfaxresume:213-38S-259S. 


GENERAL  OFFICEAaEPHOI«:  Wwlvvood 
Public  Relation*  Fkm  Is  fooklng  for  an  experi- 
enced, quallAed,  enthuaiastk  person  to  fill 
our  ganaral  offloaAeccptlortist  position,  if  you 
are  nart^nmrklng.  mature,  and  have  terrific 
telephone  skills,  wa  nmmd  you  TODAYI  FA, 
entry  level  posltfon  offers  salary  plus  bene^tk. 
Call  Kathy  at  310-44^-4800  or  fax  resume 
and  cover  fetter  to  310-446-1896. 

GET  PAID 

to  watch  TVI  Exciting  new  method.  FREE  24- 
hour  recorded  message  reveals  details.  Call 
818-775-3878  Ext.  101. 

HOST(ESS) 

ENERGETIC  and  enthusiastic  for  trervly 
Chinete  cafe  In  Century  City.  Apply  Yin 
Y»i^  102S0  Santa  Monica  Bl.  M-F,  2-7PM. 


1/2  cup  butter  or  margarine  1  6  oz.  package  of  semi^sweet  chocolate  morsels 

1  1/2  cop  grahan  cracker  crumbs  1 1/2  cup  coconut  flakes 

1  14  oz.  can  of  sweetened  condensed  milk     i  cup  chopped  nuts 

Pre-heat  oven  to  350  degrees* 
(325  degrees  if  using  a  glass  diish) 

In  a  13'^9  inch  baking  pan,  melt  butter.  Sprinkle  curbs  over  butter  and  press    , 
into  f^an.  Pour  condensed  mrlk  event/  over  crumbs.  Sprinkle  coeonut  flakes, 
chocolate  niorsels,  and  nuts  over  this  layer  and  press  doivn  firmly. 
Baike  25  to  30  minutes  or  until  lightly  golden.  Cool  before  cutting  into 
squares.  Store  loosely  covered  at  room  temperature  or  in  refrigerator. 

Tina  Itfong  ean  pick  up  her  $10  at  the  Bruin  6old  Office. 


30  Help  Wanted 


H0STA40STESS/CASHIER.  Needed  for  the 
new  dub  in  Westwood.  PT/FT,  Days  and 
evenings.  SS^Mxir.  Call  Steve  at  310-208- 
7896.  10870  Weybum. 

Instructors  Wanted 

Looking  for  bright,  enlhusiaatic  peopfe  to 
teach  SAT  l*rep.  High  test  scores  required. 
Transportation  required.  We  will  train.  Flexi- 
ble Hours.  $16/hr.  Send  Cover  fetter/resume, 
including  your  scores  by  5/31^5  to:  A  Com- 
petitive Edge.  Attn:  Barry.  1 1 SOO  W.Olympic 
Blvd.  Suite  400.  WLA,  90064.  No  Phone 
Calls  Pfease. . 

INTERNATIONAL  EMPLOYMENT-  Earn  up 
to  $2S-$45A>our  teaching  basic  conversation- 
al English  in  Japan,  Taiwan,  or  S.  Korea.  No 
teachiffg  background  or  Asian  languages  re- 
quired. For  information  call  206-632-1146 
exL  i59345. 

INTERNTIONAL  JOBS 

.  EARN    UP  TO  S2S-SSQ/hr.   teaching  basic 

conversational  English.  Work  in  Japan,  Tai- 
wan or  South  Korea.  No  Asian  languages  or 
teaching  backgrourxi  required.  310-288- 
0212,  EXT  J9204. 

JEWISH  HEBREW 

and  Sunday  Schools  need  teachers.  1995-96. 
Good  Jewish  Education  and  love  of  children 
desired.  Yonaton  Shultz  213652  6570. 

LAW  OFFICE 

Clerical  secretarial  positions.  Must  know 
WordPerfect.  Have  ofTtce  experience.  Good 
typing  skills,  flexible  hours.  Wilshire  &  Clen- 
don.  310-475-0481. 

LIE  FOR  $$$. 

Fox  Television  wants  you  for  a  r>cw  show. 
Call  Todd  at  61 8-973-2392. 

LIFEGUARD 

Certiried  lifeguard  wanted  for  pool  in  Pacific 
Palisades.  $7-9Aw.  Call  Andrew  or  Kurt  at 
310-459-4083.  Bam- 10pm. 

MALE  MODEL  for  men's  health  magazine 
ads.  Pays  S200.  Send  photo  of  face  and 
chesL  1 1693  San  Vicente.  Suite  159.  Los  An- 
geles,  CA  90049. 

MALE  MCNXLS.  Aaian,  Eurasian,  and  all 
types.  No  heigN  requirenf>ent.  Hot  head, 
cards,  pasters,  mags.  Good  money.  Funi  213- 
664-2999  24hours.        

MED.  COLLECTORS 

Candidates  must  have  experience  wo«kir>g 
w/medi-cal,  medicare.  HMO.  private  insur- 
ances. Billing  skills  required.  Fax  resume  to 
310-39a8030  or  call  310-915-8029.  Me- 
daphis Physician  Services  Corporatfon. 

MEDICAL  ASSISTANT 

for  out-patient  clinic.  Must  be  fluent  in  Eng- 
lisMapaneM.  Resumes  only  please,  to:  1950 
Sawrtaile  Bhrd.  SuHe  145,  LA,  90025. 

MCNT  TRAINEE 

No  eiqwrierKX  necessary.  OVnpany  expand- 
ing in  area.  Seeking  anthusiatfic  people  to 
manage  brarxii  oAlces.  SAOOO/rnanfh 
♦beneflta.  21 1-463-0633 

MODELS 

rwcded  for  posters  and  caUlog  assignments. 
All  type*  S'2'-5'1ir.  Photo  test  requirvd  for 
all  applicante.  Top  pay.  31 0-276- 764S. 

MOOaS:  YOUNG  MEN  WANTED  for  nude 
and  icmi-nude  modeling.  Good  pay.  Imme- 
dlate  work.  Call  Derek  21 3-845-9669. 

MTV  EXTRAS 

18-25  yean  for  MTV  Mallbu  Beach  House. 
Skate  half-pipe  celcbrHict,  pool,  arwi  morel 
5/19-9/2.  Call  818-508-75451 

NATIONAL  PARKS  HMINC.  Seasonal  4r  foil- 
time  empfoymcnt  available  al  NaUorul  Parks, 
Forarts  ir  Wlldlifo  Preserves.  Benafltt  *  bo- 
nusesl  Call:  1-206-545-4804.  eML  N59341. 

OFFia  ACCOUNTANT/BOOKKEEPER.  59- 
S12^r,  PT/FT.  Prefer  Junior  or  above,  MUST 
KNOW  Excel,  typing  skills.  3-blocks  from 
UCLA.  Call  Ron  310-47D-6175. 


30  Help  Wanted 


OFFICE  ASSISTANT.  FA  this  surrwner.  P/T 
during  school  year.  Small  Brentwood  law 
firm  seeks  organized  individual  with  »i  inter- 
est in  law  to  do  filing  and  miscellar>eous  of- 
fice tasks.  Flexible  schedule.  $7Aw  to  start. 
Call  310-207-5400  ext.75  for  details. 

OFFICE  ASSISTANT.  FA.  Type  4Swpm,  ^n- 
eral  clerical  skills,  good  opportunity,  pleasant 
environmerH.  Need  responsible,  irulependerH 
worker.  S8. 00  to  start.  310-620-3651. 

OFFICE  Hap.  Clerical  work  for  court  report- 
ing office.  ErKino.  Including  light  lypi"g, 
conr^puter,  and  filing.  PA.  Flexible  hours. 
S7.S(Vhr.  818-995-2449. 

PAINTERS  NEEDED 

Experienced/Unexperienced   FA  job    during 
^.aummer  with  residential  painting  comparry. 
$6-e^our  starting  wage.  Call  Paul,  3ia504- 
4494. 

PAINTING 

Outdoor  Painting.  40  hn/week.  ib-B/hr.  Ex- 
perience is  good  but  not  neceiaary.  Cold 
Calling  as  well.  Call  Vince  310-504-1951. 

PERSONAL  ASSISTANT  for  young  profcssidh- 
al  disabled.  Help  wAwmc  care.  Nursing 
student  preferred.  Early  morning,  3-5 
days/week.  $9/hour.  WLA.  310-312-0815. 
leave  message. 

.  PERSONAL  TRAINER.  Upscale  fitness  center. 
San  Femar¥k>  West  Valley.  Knowledge  of 
anatomy,  Call  Tim:  818-705  6500  ext  256. 

POSTAL  AND  COVERNMLNT  K3BS. 
$21/hour  -f  benefits.  No  experierxie,  will 
train.  To  apply  call  1-800  536^3040. 

PRFCT  SUMMER  JOB 

MARKETING.  Are  you  earning  what  you're 
worthf  Are  you  ready  to  focus  and  be  your 
besif  Call  310-281-81 11. 


Free  Room  &  Board 
plus  $600  a  month 

^Westwood  resident , 

Fluenriqslish/Driver's  License 
AvaifabTe>^         / 
eveninss/weekends"^ 
Please  Call: 

(310)470-3589 

ask  for  Jan 


PRIVATE    SWIM    INSTRUCTORS    al    client 
homes.  $14-$1Mw*bonu»es.  Flexible  iched 
uling.  Hiring  for  summer.  WSI  plus  stror^  ex- 
perlence.  Call  John  31 0-271  -3441 . 

RADIO  ANNOUNCERVDISK  lOCKEYS.  No 
experience  neceMary,  produce^rast  shows 
for  our  stations.  Spare  time.  Free  training, 
great  benefits,  21 3-468-0084,  24  hrm. 

RECEPTIONIST 

FA,  needed  to  anMvcr  phones,  file,  photoco- 
py, do  llgN  typir^  periform  mailroom  dulica 
and  run  occatforul  errands  for  a  nwtton  pic- 
ture company  In  BH.  Hrs:9am-6pm. 
S40QM(.  PaM  parking.  Send  resume  to  Per- 
sonnel, 9536  Wilshire  BM..  MIO.  BevcHy 
Hills,  CA  90212. 

RECEPTK)NiST.  Entry-level  posKfon  available 
Imrrtediately  for  an  energetic,  hard-wodclrtg 
person,  fob  includes  heavy  phorws,  client  In- 
teraction artd  ligM  offioe  duties.  Must  have 
good  phorte  manners  artd  firortt  office  ap- 
pearance. Call  310-274-8025  for  an  ^ipolnl- 


RECEPTONISTA^RONT  OFFICE  MANAGER. 
Have  a  Job  waling  for  you  when  you  ffadu- 
atel  FA  position  in  a  Westwood  Public  Rela^ 
tion^ampalgn  Management  Firm  requires 
an  energrtlc,  motivated  self-starter.  Tale- 
phone  skills  a  musti  Great  entry  level  oppor- 
tunity. Salary  plus  bcrwfiU.  Call  Kathy  at  310- 
446-4800  or  fax  resume  lo  310-446-1096 
TODAY. 


30  Help  Wanted 


RECEPTONIST/General  Office/Human  Re- 
sources, FA  position  available  in  growing 
health  care  managfement  ofTice.  Team  player, 
profossional  phone  manrter,  clear  articula- 
tion, salary  commensurate  with  expcrieixx. 
Hours:  7am-3:30pm.  Fax  resume  lo  818-377- 
2539  or  mail  to  15233  Ventura  Blvd.,  #420, 
Sherman  Oaks,  CA  91 403,  Attn:  Michele. 

RETAIL  SALES 

PA  help  for  children's  clothing  store. 
Saturdays  a  muA.  iJftv.  WLA  area.  310-204- 
1696. 

RETAIL  SALES.  Chiforen's  book  shop.  Must 
be  available  Sat.  ar\d  have  knowledge  of 
children's  books.  WLA  310-559-2665. 

RETAIL/RECEIVING 

Beverly  Hills  Menswear  store  seeks  detail-ori- 
ented, computer-literate  individual  for  multi- 
faceted  position.  Most  possess  excellent  com- 
munication and  organizatiorul  skills.  Full- 
time.  310-471-6436. ^ 

SALES  PERSON 

for  aftefnooTH.  Paris  Pastry.  No  experierxie 
necessary.  $5.5(^wur.  Apply  in  person:  1448 
Westwood  Blvd.  or  call  Corinne  310-474- 
8888. 

SANTA  MONKTA  REAL  ESTATE  DEVELOP- 
MENT CO.:  Looking  for  one  or  more  enthu- 
siaclic  individuals  who  want  to  leam  about 
real  estate  through  assisting  in  the  leasing  of 
our  Southern  California  shopping  centers. 
Will  gain  immeme  knowledge  and  expcri- 
erx:e  in  real  properly  transactions,  ranging 
from  tenant  prospecting  and  ,  CM^vasing  to 
lease  documentation.  SlOOCVmonth  -f  bonus 
of  $500  per  deal-surrvner  position.  Please 
fax  resume  to:  Bollcnbaciicr  &  Kellon,  Inc. 
310-3990062.  Attn:  Brooks  Borror. 

SCHOOLBUS  DRVRS  . 

MAKE  $9-1Q/HR.  DRIVING  CHILDREN. 
FA-PA.  No  experierKe  necessary,  we  will 
train.    310-472-7474. 

SECRETARY,  PA.  Work  in  your  home.  Fax 
machirw  and  typewriter  rwcessary.  Scrwi  re- 
sume: P.O.  Box  49421,  Los  Angeles,  CA 
90049. 


30  Help  Wanted 


SERVERS 

WAITERS/WAITRESSES  for  Hollywood  Bowl 
Picnic  Baskets  Restaurant,  nighu  |une  3-er>d 
of  September.  Call  21 3-851  3588  for  applica- 
tion. 

SERVERS  WANTED/BIKINI.  Earn  $100+/4hift. 
Must  be  outgoing,  attractive,  I84-.  Call  618- 
765-5217. 

SUMMER  CAMP 

IN  MALIBU.  Salary  plus  room  and  board.  Po- 
sitions include:  sailing,  water  tki,  pool  super- 
visor, riflcry,  song  leader  arvi  cabin  court- 
selors.  Call  for  application  and  more  informa- 
tion: 818^880  3700 

SUMMER  JOBS 

Activists  needed  to  work  on  an  initiative 
campaign.  Have  fun,  make  a  differerK*,  tarn 
a  paycheckl  $250-$60G/week.  310-449- 
5390. 

SUMMER  JOBS 

WORTH  REMEMBERING.  Earn  for  school 
while  being  a  camp  counselor.  A  great 
sumnrwr  job  for  students.  Must  live  in  LA  or 
Ver>tura  County.  Weekend  interviewing  now. 
Call  818^865  6263. 

SUMMER  JOBS! 

Hiring  r>ow.  5  10  full  and  part  time  jobs 
earning  SIQ/hr  Jobs  filled  fir«  come,  first- 
terve  basis.  Call  3ia374-4993. 

SUMMER  lOBS.  Earn  S8-1(Vhr  interviewing 
at  beach-sitei/on-the-phone  Uun.12-Sep.30). 
Full-time  requires  2-3  wcekerxJf/month.  Part- 
time  days,  nights,  and  weekends.  Resume  to: 
Dr.  Mitchell  Nides:  1 145  Gayley  Ave,  1301, 
LA  CA  90024    3ia?09-6016. 

SWIM  INSTRUCTORS 

Earn  $10-1 4A^r.  Spring  and  summer.  West 
LVValley.  Experience  a  plus.  Background 
working  with  children.  Flexible  hours.  Greg 
310  289-7254. 

TELEMARKETER,  lead  setter  for  construction 
company,  FA  or  PA.  $7Aw  +  commissiom, 
should  average  $500/wk.  213-937-8555. 


$7/HR  +  BONUS 

The  UCLA 
Annual  Fund 

Join  other  VJCLA  Students 
in  raising  funds  for  Academic  Program: 

*Rexiblc  hours 
*Close  to  campus  j    ^w 

*Qreat  resume  builde^KP^P    .\ 
♦Comfortable  work^'to^  |  ■ 
environment        '^-^  '^  J 


/xOv  '' 


UCLA  Annual  Pund 

IMS  Gayl«y  4th  Floor 

794-OS77 


■^  •  • 


k^ 


24    Monday,  May  22, 1995 


Daily  Bruin  Classified 


30  Help  Wanted 


TELEMARKETERS  NEEDED  IMMEDIATELY. 
Excellam  pay,  flexible  hourt,  near  campus. 
Openings  available  immediaiely.  Telemarket- 
ing experience  preferred.  Call  310-552- 
62  S3. 

TELEPHONE  SALES 

INVESTMENT  FIRM  located  in  Sherman  Oaks 
leeking  broker's  assistant.  Part-time,  hourly 
watte  ♦bonuses.  Call  81^783-4900. 

TRANSLATOR 

Student  fluent  in  Chinese  (or  book  project 
Need  good  translation  skills  (Chinese  to  Eng- 
lish). Good  pay.  Set  own  hours.  310-285- 
8616. 


VS  GOVT.  JOBS  hirinf  now:  IOC's  of  ErNrjr 

level  openings  updated  dally.  Call  toll  free  1- 

800  549  2300,  Ext  •3872. 

UCPO  is  hiring  a  property  assistar^  to  the. Po- 
lice Property  Officer.  Candidate  must  pau 
background  check,  be  IXILA  student,  able  to 
x«/ork  sumnrter  and  beyond.  19hr^ivk,  $7.18. 
Uniform  mandatory  (Provided).  Apply  at 
Campus  police  stilion,  front  counter,  or  call 
310^25-9371. 

UCPD  is  hiring  front-courfter  assistants.  On- 
-campus,  flexible  daytime  schedule,  VS^ 
hours/wk.  $6.89/hr.  Must  be  full-lime  UCLA 
student.  Get  application  from  campus  police 
station,  front  counter,  or  call  310-206-8126. 


33  Jobs  Wanted 


US/INT'L  CO. 

presently  operating  in  25  countries.  Expand- 
ing rapidly.  Needs  help  immediately.  PA 
$50a2,OOQATH>;  FA  S2,000-6,00(Vmo.  310- 
274-3440. 

\  WAITERS 

WAFTERVWAITRESSES.  Atleast  2-years  ex- 
periefKe  in  ^ench  service,  banquet  facility. 
Must  oyvnldxedo.    Call  Avi,  310^470-2821, 

I0anrv-3pm.  10S00  Wilshire  Blvd. 

WORD  PROCESSING  SPECIALIST  for  UCLA 
Divison  of  Nephrology.  FA,  M-F,  8-5.  Medi- 
cal Termirtology  required.  Contact  Mark, 
310-206-6741  or  fax  resume  310^825-6309. 
UCLA  Affirmative  Action.  Equal  Opportunity 
Employer. 

WORK=FUN 

Management.  International  marketing  firm 
expanding  in  L.A.  area.  Looking  for  people 
who  like  to  travel  arKi  enjoy  working  with 
people.  3-5K/mo.  potential.  Call  818-447- 
2580. 

WRITER 

SMALL  CENTURY  CITY  LAW  flRM  seeks  FA 
excellent  writer  (o  prepare  immigration  peti- 
tions. No  legal  experier>ce  required.  Word- 
processing  experience.  Degree  Required. 
$llA>r  start.  CallAax  resume  and  writing 
sample  (4-pagcs  max.).  Phone:310-553- 
6600.  Fax:3ia553-2616. -_ 

WRITtK'S  EXCHANGE  has  work  for  creative 
ly-lalentcd  writers.  Paperback  novels,  Non- 
Fiction  Books,  Magazir>e  articles.  Screen- 
plays. Openings  for  good  interrw.  310-209- 
0681,  Vernon. 


31  Temporary  Agencies 


MAC/IBM  SKILLS 

Worth   S16/hour.  Don't  go  to  a  temp-farm. 
Don't  join  the  herd.  Call  SUPERIOR  TEMPS. 

310312-0131. 


32  Career  Opportunities 


BOOKKEEPING 

Medical  records.  Excellent  opportunity  for 
experience,  supervised  by  CPA.  Computer 
krwwlcdge,  reliable,  personable,  self-moti- 
vated, skilled,  IrMelligcnt.  Fax   resume:  213- 

342-0876. 

Century  City  Irwcslmcnt  Banking  Firm  seek- 
ing broker  trairwe  and/or  broker.  Great  op- 
portunity! rn.  Call  [3enny  Arlache  310-843- 
9007. 

GRADUATING? 

ENVIRONMENTAL  MARKETING  COMPANY 
seeks  individuals  for  cntrylcvel/managcr  po- 
sitiom.  Altitude  more  important  than  experi- 
ence. $3000-5000/monlh  potential.  818-447- 
745  5. • 

MULTIMILLIONAIRE  seeks  leaders.  Those 
wanting  FinarKial  stability  now  call  1-800- 
720-2253  Ext  1956.  

SELL  WEB  SITES 

Entry  level  position  open  for  Internet  savvy, 
good  communicator  eager  to  make  money 
selling  advertising  and  Home  Pages  on  the 
World  Wide  Web.  FAX  raver  letter  and  re 
sunr>e  to:  Beverly  Hills  Internet.  310-273- 
0404,  or  e-mail:  sales  •bhi90210.com. 


BARTENDER 
TRAINEES 

•no  experience  necessary 
•earn$100-$200  daily 
.•more  jobs  than  graduates 
•nation  wide  job  placennent 

NATIONAL  BARTENDERS 
SCHOOL 

1-800-646-MIXX 

(6499) 
10  So.  Cal.  Locations 


TELEMARKETING 

P/T  Appt  Setters 

For  Major  Cars  OjfQ.  in  Pleasant  Bay 

His  Ofc  Must  Tyf»  35  wpm-f  Prior  TM 

exp  pref.  $9/hr  +  comm 

(310)855-8603 


34  Internships 


INTERNS  NEEDED 

Fast  paced  entcrtainnwnt  Management^o- 
duction  CO.  seeks  motivated  interns.  IrK/ed- 
ible  irxiuslry  exposure,  no  pay.  Credits: 
'Hook,'  Jade,'  'Universal  Soldier.'  fm  n- 
turptf.  310-996-1892,  Attn:  Carol. ^ 


MUPPETS! 

Do  you  krm  the  MuppctsI  Well  then,  contact 
Halk  at  213-96a4096  about  a  script  rcaiiing 
and  research  Irtemshlp. 

TALENT  AGENCY.  LHcrary  Aytnl  SMking  bv 
terrVAasistant.  Flexible  hours,  great  expari- 
erxx,  room  for  advarKcnwnL  Non-paid.  310- 
27B-3600. 


35  Child  Care  Wanted 


MANHATTAN  BEACH 

RaiABLE,  ENERGETIC  UCi^  STUDENT 
r^eeded  to  care  (or  2-year/old.  Experience,  ex- 
cellent refercTKes  required.  M-F,  15 
hoursAveek.  S7Ay.  310-416.6990. 
OCCASJONAl.  BABYSITTER  needed  for  two 
children,  8  ar>d  6  years.  1^,  refcrerKCt. 
Woodland  Hills.  818-592-6263. 

Responsible  person  to  help  out  with  two 
children,  afterrvxirw/evenir>gs,  some  wee- 
ker>ds.  Possible  driving  llght-housekeepir>g. 
References  required.  Call  Nancy  310-475- 
8359. , 

SUMMER  SITTER  (fun,  energetic  studenO 
needed  for  1 3  year-old  boy.  Daytinrte  hours. 
West  Hollywood  area.  Car  needed.  Female 
preferred.  21 3-931 -0044,ext261. 


49  Apartments  for  Rent 


1-MINUTETOUCLA 

WtSTWOOO-  S52S-$800  studio/1 -bdrm. 
furnished/unfurnished,  pool,  laurylry,  rw>  pets, 
no  parki'nu.  1 -year  lease.  310-824-3000. 

1-BDRM$575 

Huge  apartments.  Ideal  for  roommates.  Gar- 
den courtyard,  pool,  AJC,  phone-entry.  Near 
Sherman  Oaks  Galleria.  Mirnites  to  campus. 
818  997  7312. 

1 -BEDROOM  $675 

Garden  courtyard.  Quiet  residential  area.  Ap- 
pliarxies,  bliryJs,  parking,  laurviry,  and  nrM>rel 
Bike  or  Blue  bus  to  campus.  310-477-0725. 


49  Apartments  for  Rent 


BRENTWOOD  ADI 

Brig^  spacious  upper  bachelor.  All  utllHics 
paid  lor  ir>cluding  laundry  facilities.  $449. 
310-312-0265. 

BRENTWOOD  AOJ.  1-mile  to  campus.  Large 
single,  $625,  available  June  7th.  Large  1- 
bdrm,  $735,  available  June  21  it.  1235  Feder- 
al  Ave.  310-477-7237. 

BRENTWOOD 

Gated  buikiing,  $105(ynwnth.  Airy  3-bed- 
roonV2-bafth.  Fireplace,  stov«Aridge,  laurvlry, 
Bcrtwr  carpet,  miniblinds.  1/2-4alock  from 
Wlbhlrc  but.  Crad  student  preferred.  310- 

275-7139. 

BRENTWOOD.  $117S/monlh.  Luxury 
2bdrm,  2bath.  I^ew  security  building.  Gated 
parking,  ^imc  area.  506  Barrington.  213- 
934-5000. 


49  Apartments  for  Rent 


BRIGHT  &  SUNNY 

WESTWOOD.  2bdrm/2ba,  fireplace,  refrig- 
erator, parking,  $1295Atk>.  Available  imme- 
diately. 213-939-0610. 

CLOSE  TO  UCLA 

WEST  LA.  Bundy/SanU  Monica  Blvd.  1  -bed, 
1-bath.  $60Q^TM>.  Laundry  room  available. 
Call  evenlnxs,  310-820-7776. 

CULVER  CrTY.  $685.  2-bedroom  duplex,  le- 
cure,  quiet,  laundry,  yard,  garage.  Buses,  off- 
street  parking.  Near  Sony  Studios.  Availble 
July  K  310-837-6779. 

EAST  OF  VILLAGE 

Large  2-bdrrTV2-ba.  1/2-block  to  cantpus. 
Gated-entry  and  2-car  parking  large  closet, 
dishwasher,  microwave.  No  pets.  $1295&up. 
310-208-2376. 

FREE  LAUNDRY 

CULVER  CITY.  3+2.  Miniblinds,  track  light- 
ing, NEW  Berber  capet  Stove,  D/W,  2<ar 
parking.  4-miles  UCLA.  $1200.  213-936- 
2406. 

LARGE  SINGLE 

Quiet  area,  Wilshire  district,  separate  kitch- 
er^athroom,  furnished/unfurnished.  Trust- 
worthy student  preferred.  Call  Dar>te  at  City 
Newrs  (eve)  714-773-4902.  $39S/month. 

MAKE  A  DEAL!! 

WLA/PALMS.  Single  apartment,  $550.  Clean, 
large  pool,  corrvcnierU  to  shopping  and 
UaA,  3ia204-4332. 

MAR  VISTA,  $845.  2-bec|/2-bath.  Newer,  2- 
story,  custom  townhome,  fireplace,  gated  ga- 
rage, unit  alarm.  Open  7-days/9-5.  11748 
Courtleigh  Dr.  310^391-1076. 

MAR  VISTA,  S845.  2-bedroonV2  bath.  New- 
er, 2-story  custom  towr^house.  Gated  garage, 
unit  alarm,  fireplace.  Open  7-day^-5. 
11748CounlciRh  Dr.  310-391-1076. 


3-bd/2-ba,  $960/mo       NEAR  EVERYTHING 


WLA.  Corwcnient  to  canr>pus,  quiet,  rwwiy 
painted,  laurwiry,  bright.  Available  inrwne- 
diately.  11521  Rochester  Ave.  Informa- 
tion/open  house,  call  310-476-231  7. 


Barrington 
Townhouse 

*FMne  Brentwood  Location 
^2bcd/2balh$1275 
*CI()se  to  UCLA 

*  Swimming  pool 
^Galcd  Parking 
*Laundry  facilities 
^Central  air  conditioning 

*  Roommates  accepted 

Mgr:  (310)  471-2498 
330  S.  Barrington  Ave. 
Brentwood,  CA  90049 


WEST  LA.  $6754security  deposit.  1-bdrnVl- 
bath.  1410  S.Barrington.  310-671-8570  dt 
310-4iai499. 


NEAR  SCHOOL 

8KLNTWOOD,  11675  Darlington.  2  bed 
rooms/2-balhs  from  $1100  and  up.  310-4ia 
1499.  3ia671  8570. 

PALMS  $575 

1 -bdrrr/l -ba,  large  upper  quiet  unit 
Refrigerator,  stove,  parking,  laundry.  3219 
Baglcy.  310-206-997S,  day.  213-876-0371, 

evening. 

PALMS  $595,  1 -bedroom  security  building, 
very  quiet,  all  appliarKes.  Convenient  to 
campus.  Security  deposit  $100.  VC,  laundry. 
310^37-7061. 


3-BDRM  HOUSE 

West  wood  Own  roorr^ath  and  use  of  guest- 
roonVoffice  w/computer.  Furniture  available, 
laundry,  fireplace,  dishwasher,  security,  yard. 
S65fVmonlh.  My,  310^471  8031. 

3R0  AND  LA  CIENEGA.  Huge  1 -bedroom 
apartnrwr>t.  Survty,  immaculately  mainlairwd, 
parking,  $700ATmnth.  Call  llene  213-651- 
4002. 


GENUINE  UCLA 
SPECIALS 

FUMNISHEO  BACHELORS 

From  $  495 

1^  liKNISXI  I)  SINf  il  f  ^ 

From  S  595 

rtJMNISMhll    1    UK>Mf><)rv1^ 

From  $795 

SHOMT    TfMM  AVAIL  AHLP 
IJIMF.CTLV  Af:MOSS  FHOr/1 
MlfJ  <;AM»»US  UCLA 
WAl  K    TO  < 


WESTWOOO  PLAZA 

APAHTr/IFNTS 

!i01    'jOf.  CiAVLtV  Ave 

(T1(»)   ;»C>H    M'.ll', 


PALMS  $750.  2-bdrm/1-ba,  refrigerator,  dish- 
washer, stove,  cemral  air,  fireplace,  two  urv 
dergrour>d  parking.  Quiet.  Bus  #12.  6-ycar 
new  security  building.  310-556-1 688. 


AFFORDABLE  APT.       pALMS  2-BR  CONDO 


PALMS.  $4754ingle,  $575-1 -bedroom.  Re- 
fridgcratcx,  stove,  disposal,  A/C,  pool,  park- 
ir>g,  laundry.  Open  house  Saturday/Sunday  1  - 
5pm.  10136Natlonal  Blvd.  310-836-1413. 

AMAZING  DEAL 

WLA.  1629  Brockton.  Singles  $530.  New 
appliarKes,  icarpet,  vertical-blirwis,  cable 
ready,  gated.  Good  student  discount  on  parfc- 
inn.  3 1  a4 77-01 12. 

BEVERLY  HILLS  ADJ 

1&2  BEfiMOOMS  $725  $895.  SOME 
WAiARDWOOD  FLOORS.  ONLY  1/2 
BLOCK  TO  PICO  BUS.  ASK  ABOUT  BIG 
BONUSIII  3iae396294.  - 

BRENTWOOD 

2-bdrrn/1-bth  (or  rent,  11651  Gorham  Ave., 
N  of  San  Vicente,  $775.  3ia471.5388. 


Stove,  dishwasher,  VC,  balcony,  security 
building  and  parking.  10-minutes  from  cam- 
pus. $75Q^month.  Don.  3ia838-9962,  3ia 
838-1600  x-641 4. 

PALMS  371 7CARDIFF 

HUGE,  2-BED/2-BATH,  $875.  UPPER,  FIRE 
PLACE,  EXTRA  aOSET,  ALk  AMENITIES, 
GATED,  NEWER  BUILDING,  QUIET.  1  BED, 
$675.  13-MIN  TO  UCLA,  NEAR  THE  10 
AND  405.  310-836-7146  OR  310-838- 
0131. 

PALMS  3675  VINTON.  2ND  FLOOR  2-lv^ 
unfurnished  bedi/1-bath.  $77S/Wm>.  Call 
310-544-3262. 


PALMS.  $995,  2-bed/24>alh,  custom  lowrv 
home,  fireplace,  balcony,  gated  garajp, 
alym  In  unit.  3614  Faris  Or.  3ia391-1076, 
837-0906. 


WESTWOOD  VILLAGE 

Enormous  apartments  with  dining 
room,  balcony,  fireplace,  bit-ins 
Pool,  gated  subterranean  parking, 

FREE  CABLE  TV. 

1  Bedroom/ 1  Bath, from$  800 

2Bedroom/2Bath from  $1,300 

691  LEVERING  AVENUE 
(310)  208-3647 


PALMS.  S995,  2-bed/2-balh,  custom  town- 
-horoc    Firaptaca,    balcony,    gated   garage, 


alarm  in  unit  3614  Farit  Dr.  310-391-1076, 
837-0906.  ^ 

PALMS.  S995.  2-bed^-bath,  custom  town- 
home,  fireplace,  balcony,  gated  garagr, 
alarm  In  UniL  3614  Faris  Dr.  310-391-1076, 
837-0906. 

PALMSv  2-f  1  upper,  bright,  quiet,  gated  park- 
ing, rww  carpet  $675.  Available  now.  Call 
Marios.  310-829-0589.  

PALMS.  Discounted  apartments.  Ibdrm- 
$550,  2bdrrT\/1ba-  $725,  bachelor  apart- 
ntents-  $425.  Minutes  to  Century  City  ar>d 
Westwood.  3264  Overland.  310-837-3013. 

PALMS/WLA. 

1 -bedroom,  2-bedroom,  3-bedroom,  from 
$550  up.  Bright,  quiet,  carpel/drapes, 
stove/refrigerator,  parking.  Close  to  bus,  free- 
ways,  shopping.  No  peU^  3 10-479-8099. 

PALMS:  SINGLE&1BD 

Single,  $495.  Ibdrm,  $595.  1  month  free 
rent.  Appliances,  no  pets.  Call  9am-7pm  310- 
837-4196.  Ask  for  manager. 

Professional  Bidg 

WESTWOOD-2-BED/2-BATH,  BEAUTIFUL 
PARK  VIEW,  balcony,  large-bedroonts,  walk- 
in  closets,  full-amenities,  rooftop-pool/jacuz- 
zi.  Ready  move-in.  $1350.  Call  appoint- 
ment: 1380  Veteran  310-477-5108. 

RESERVE  NOW 

WESTWOOD.  FALL  AND  SUMMER 
RENTALS.  Ibdmn  from  $885,  2bdrrTV2ba 
from  $1195.  Walk  to  UCLA  and  village. 
Quiet  small  building  with  security  parking. 
Call  betvirecn  9am  and  7pm  for  an  appoint- 
ment 310-208-4835.  51 9  Glenrock  Avenue. 

SANTA  MONICA 

3-bedroonV2-bath  w/garage.  15-minutes  to 
UOA.  Half-block  south  of  Wilshire.  For  N/S 
grad  student  Available  7/1.  $160(y(TK)nth. 
310-828^6621. 

SHERMAN  OAKS 

$735.  Gated,  2-bed/2-bath,  central  air,  dish- 
washer- Also  single,  $450,  1 3406  Moorpark 
St  81 8-907-9237  or  81 8-222-8298. 

SINGLE,  $425 

WLA-PALMS.  Stove,  refrigerator.  Corwenient 
to  Westside,  UCLA  and  shopping.  Call  310- 
559-7571. 


LUXURY  LIVING  AT  STUDENT  PRICES 


RESERVE  YOUR  APARTMENT 


W 


''^       UP  TO 

2  STUDENTS 

ov^eBEOBOOt^ 

"  UP  TO 

3  STUDENTS 

^  UP  TO 

5  STUDENTS 


ROOFTOP  SIJNOFCK  •  )ACIJ^/I 

riTNE-ilCFfnER  •  SAUHA.BBO 

GATED  PAHKINf, /EXTRA  SPACES  AVAIL  | 

CENTRAL  AIR  MEAT  •  EXTRA  LARGE  PATIO' 

INDIVIDUAL  APT  ALARM  SYSTEMS 

24MR   STUDY  ROOM  •  ON  SITE  LAUNOftV 


3  BLOCKS  TO  CAMPUS 

FREE  ROOMMATE  LOCATION  SERVICE 


824-9691 


49  Apartments  for  Rent 


SINGLES  &  BACHS 

WESTWOOO.  $475-S78a  OvHookf  JlVtft- 
wood  Park.  Clean,  qui«L  Pool,  patio,  gated- 
parking,  entry-eyslcm.  Available  imnwdlate- 
ly-)une,  July.  AunusL  Terd  3ia477.6352. 

STUDENT  SPECIAL 

SINGLE  APARTMENTS.  Near  buMS.  Com- 
pletely renovated.  Bike^or  ride  to  campus. 
Near  parks.  Laundry  ar>d  parking.  MaiMchu- 
setuE.o(405.  $510.  310-479-2819. 

TOWNHOUSE 

WLA.  2-BDRAV2.5-BATH,  nev^.  weH-malrt- 
Uir>ed.  conveniently  \ocMmd,  security  buiki- 
ing, subterranean  parking,  laurwJry.  310-479- 
6858. 


UNIQUE 


\^5TVWOO0^CENTURY  CITY.  Lm§h  ap^ 

^<1aut  singlet.   Stvting  at  $60C^month.  Air, 

/  Pool,  S-minulct  LKIA.  Ple«c  Call  Pamela 

310-474-5700. 

WALK  TO  UCLA 

Westwood.  Bachckv  apartment  Hardwood 
floor.  Full  bath  and  shoM«r,  refrigerator/courv 
ter,  no  full  kitchen.  Utilitiet  included. 
$45Si/month.  310-208-6265. 

WALK  TO  UCLA 

WESTWOOD.  Taking  reservatkMW  for  sum- 
nr>er  and  fall.  Bachebr,studio,  1  bdrm  with  pa- 
tio, and  2bdrm.  Hardwood  floora,  spackxjs, 
bright,  parking  and  laundry.  Call  310-279- 
1887. 


Daily  Bruin  Classified 


Monday,  May  22, 1995    25 


MOVE-IN  SPECIALS 

WESTWOOD  VILLA 

APARTMENTS 

EXEC.  SINGLES/ONE  BEDROOM 

ONE  BEDROOM  W/DEN 

FURNISHED/UNFURNISHED 

*  INDV.  PATIO 
♦HEATED  POOL 

*  WALK-IN  CLOSET 

*  FIREPLACE 

*  KEY  ENTRY 

*  UNDERGROUND  PRKG 

*  NEW  WASHERS/DRYER 

*  REFRIGERATOR 

*  DISHWASHER 

*  STOVE/OVEN 

MANAGEMENT  ON-SITE 

Call:    (310)479-2120 
or    (310)479-3531 


WEST  L.A. 

Large  unfurnished  one-bdrm  S600.  Mini 
blinds,  ceiling  farv,  stov^refrlgerator,  new 
paint.  UCLA  bus  line.  3637  Scpulveda  Blvd 
Apt.  #5.  (Two  bkicks  north  o(  Venice  BKrd) 
310-390-5065. 

WEST  LA 

Single,  $595.  1 -person,  no  pets.  Full  kitchen. 
CarpeU,  blinds,  parking,  laundry,  2-mlles 
UCLA.  By  appointment  11321 
MassachusetU.  310-477-8750. 

WEST  LA.  10  minutes  to  UCLA,  big  &  bright. 
Low  move-in.  2-bdrnV2-blh,  Single  S695  & 
up.  WASHCR/DRYER,  W.B.  fireplace,  sec. 
alarm,  ROOFTOP  SPA.  11221  Richland. 
4783990. ^^ 

WESTWOOD 

2-BedroonV1 -bath,  $1050.  Single,  $675. 
Great  location,  2  bkxks  UCLA.  1  c»  park- 
ing. Available  )uly.  Days,  310-273-7598. 
Evenings,  310-286-0980. 

WESTWOOD 

2bedroorn/2bath.  $950  AND  UP.  TILE 
KITCHEN,  STEPDOWN  LIVING  ROOM.  UN- 
USUAL CHARM.  1-1/2  MILE  TO  LKIA.  3ia 
8396294." 

WESTWOOD 

3-MINUTE  WALK  TO  CAMPUS,  security 
building,  high-celling,  A/C,  fireplace,  inter- 
com, gated  garaoe,  no  pets.  Bachelor/ilrv 
gle/single-flofl/2-bedroom.  $55O-$12O0. 
310-208^0732. 

WESTWOOO  424  LANOTAIR,  NEXT  TO 
UCLA.  2-  and  3-bedroom  apartments  avail- 
able for  summerAall.  Hardwocxl  floors,  bal- 
conies, laundry  room,swlmmlng  pool.  Call 
310-459  1200. 

WESTWOOD  APT. 

2-bed/2-bath,  1  bcd/1  bath.  Walking  distance 
to  LICLA-  Refrigerator,  microwave,  dish- 
washer, stove,  garbage-disposal,  fireplace, 
central- air.  Available  fcir  summer.  Open 
house  daily.   310-208-3387. 

WESTWOOD 

Summer  housing.  522  L^ndfair.  $60G/mo. 
OcMjbte  occuparKy.  Irtcludes  cable,  gas,  wa- 
ter, trash.  Call  Keith,  310-794-371 1  or  Kerlm, 

310^24-0757. 

WESTWOOO -Landfalr.  1  or  2  lemaM  to 
share  1  -bedroom  in  spacious  2-bedroonV1  -S- 
balh  townhouse.  Available  6/19-V31.  Hyd- 
wood  floors,  parking.  $67SAnonth.  310-824- 
5564. 


49  Apartments  for  Rent 


'■*  MAR  VISTA  *" 

2B0.  2BA.  2  STORY 

CUSTOM  TOWNHOMES. 

GATED  GARAGE,  CENTRAL  AIR, 

FIREPLACE,  UNIT  AURM 

*  11748  COURTLEIGH  DR  $845 

*  PALMS  * 

2  BO,  2BA  CUSTOM  TOWNHOME, 

FIREPLACE,  BALCONY,  GATED 

GARAGE,  ALARM  IN  UNIT 

♦  3614  FARIS  DR  $995 

^   CALL  (310)391-1076 
'    (^         TO  SEE  THE 
I.         LOVELY  APARTMENTS  m\ 


Monterey 
Plaza 

2  Bed  /  2  Bath 
$1200 

Central  Air/Central  Heat. 

Security  building. 

Will'Allow  4  in 

I  Apartment 

Now  reserving  for  Fall 

11701  Texas  Ave. 

(310H77-0858 


WESTWOOO.  Taking  reservations  for  surrv 
mer  wi  fall.  2-bed^-bath,  all  appliances', 
swimming  pool/jacuui,  walk  to  LXILA. 
S120Q-1400.  Call  310-624-0833. 

WESTWOOD.  Walk  to  UCLA.  Large  2- 
bdrm/2-balh.  From  $1250-1 45(VmontH.  Re 
frigcralor,  stove,  VC,  fireplace,  gated  park- 
ing, rooftop  spa.  sun  deck.  S12  Veteran.  310- 
208-2655. 

WESTWOOD/BEVHILLS^NTURY  CITY  ad- 
jacent. Prime  location.  2-bedroom  $990, 
rwar  UCLMxJses/office^mall.  Large,  beauti- 
ful, carpets,  appliances,  laundry,  bright,  din- 
ing, balcor^,  private-garage,  quiet-building. 
310-474-1172.       

WESTWOOD/PRIME.  Across  LICLA.  Con- 
trolled entry/parking  Full  kitchen.  1-bdrms. 
$800-900,  2-bdrms,  $1200-1300.  Taking  res- 
ervations for  summer  arxl  fall.  445  Landfalr. 
310-824-1969. -^ ; 

WLA 

$600.  Butler  and  SanU  Monica  Blvd.  1  -bed- 
room, kitcherVdinin^  stove/refrigerator,  park- 
ing, laundry,  2-miles  from  UCLA,  blue  bus. 
Convenient  location.  310-452-3622. 

WLA  LARGE  2BDRM 

WLA.  $800  and  up.  Large  2bdrm  ^1  3/4 
bath.  Seperate  dining  room.  No  pets.  818- 
703-8248. 

WLA  $1500.  Large  3bdrnV2  full  bath  house. 
Nice  yard.  31 0-82M  561. 

WLA  1 -BDRM 

$62S/n>onth.  Move-in  bortus,  first  month  free. 
Good  kxalion,  parking,  laurxlry  room, 
stoveAridge,  security  building.  1530  Crarv 
vllle.   310-453-4009. 

WLA 

2-bdrm^  .5-bth,  $9Safsecurity,  gated  co 
mmunity,  mini-view,  upper  unit,  built- 
ira/custom  closet,  pool/jacuzzi,  tennis  court, 
remote  garage.  213-872-1952,  310-202- 
1675.  Ask  (or  Percy. 

WLA 

Special  move-in  rates,  2-bedroom,  A/C,  fire- 
place, gaied-parking  and  entry  in  quiet-build 
ing  15-min  from  UCLA  or  SMC.  3414  )as- 
mine.  Call  for  details  31 0-836- 1 360. 


WLA-$620 


BELOIT    AND  OHIO.    1-BDRMS    available, 
$620.  Verticals  and  covered-parking,    laun 
dry,  no  peU,  310-477-3316.  Singles,  $580, 
310-477-5472. 


49  Apartments  tor  Rent 


WESTWOOO.  DELUXE  1-BEORM.  10- 
MINUTE  WALK  TO  UCLA.  VIEW  APAR- 
TMENT, QUIET  BUILDING.  AVAILABLE 
NOW.  $900.  11088OPHIR  OR.  CALL  310- 
208-8881.310-208-2655. 

WESTWOOO.  Summer  rer«als-  discounted. 
1  -bik  walk  %vest  UCLA.  Single,  $600;  1  -bdrm, 
$700;  large  1-bdrm,  $900  (3-4  persons).  310- 
824-0782. 


/? 


Diamond  Head 
Apartments 

Single  $675 

1  bedroom  $850 

2  bedroom  $1095 
2  bedroom  $1275 

Grwat  Building 

N«90tiabl«  Rant 

VI/ond«rful  Managers 

Reserve  units  for  Fall  now. 

660  Veteran 

20a-2251 


^ 


Apartment  for  Rent 

1/2  month  free 
Low,  Low  Move  In 

-  Great  Singles 

-  Full  kitchen  and 
bathrooms,  pool, 
laundry,  parking 

-  Freeway  and  UCLA  close 

-  $450  per  month 

-  1729Belolt 

Call  310-479-5043 


^:iiiiniiintiixixixniiry 


Summer/Fall 
Housing 

•  Fall  min.  $400  per  month 

•Summer  $41 5  per  session 

(Women  only) 

824  Hilgard 

(310)208-0906 


xiiixixixiiumxiitnii 


SPECTfiCUKIR 

Split-level  single  / 1 


•felreshingpool 

•Muru 
•iHlconies 


INrin 

^Urting 

.  al$675  . 


•ublerpa(jy 
^•filr«S(f'nlH 
>*iumished  units 
Nibble 


•aaoss  from  UCLA 


Utilities  paid  for  select  units 
Assigned  gated  parking  included 

535  Gayley     (3 1 0)  208-38 1 8 


49  Apartments  for  Rent 


WESTWOOO.  $1395.  3-bedfoonV2.5-bath 
UMVn-apartment  1 .2  milct  nev  UCLA.  1 61 S 
Cracnfleld  Ave.  310-459-6800. 


WESTWOOD.  1-bdrm,  $1100.  2-bdmn, 
$1500.  Ntw,  high  quality  luxury  building.  2 
Wocka,  MMJth  of  Wilthire.  Balcorty,  A/C,  Ja- 
cuzzi, marble  fireplace.  Call  Courtr«ey,  310- 
473-9998. 


WLArl-bed  $800-850,  Sirtgle  $635.  Security 
building,  parfcir>g,  air,  pool,  laundry,  1/2-miic 
to  UCLA,  ckxe  to  but.  14S0Midvalc.  310- 
391  -2874. 

WLA-MELROSE  PLACE? 

WLA  Huge  2-bdrm/2-bath,  $950;  large 
bachelor  $499.  Swimming  pool,  tundeck, 
laurwiry,  barbecue,  appliances.  Melrote  Place 
look-alikel  1621  Westgale.  310-820-1121. 

WLA.  $81SAnonth.  2-bedroorT/1 -bath  up- 
per,  nice  view,  north  of  Santa  Monica.  Clote 
lo  UCLA,  shopping.  Bright,  nice  neighbor- 
hood, greenery.  Stove,  refrigerator,  balcony, 
new  decor.  Laundry,  parking.  1 444  Barry  #5. 
310-264-0678. 

WLA.  $45(:^ino,  bachelor  near  SanU  Moni- 
cVBundy.  Carpets,  drapes,  refrigerator,  laurv 
dry,  no  pets.  Availabie  June  1st.  310-822- 
6487.      -  • 

WLA  BACHELOR  $475.  Close  to  campus, 
pool,  \aundry,  refrigerator,  clean.  1330  S. 
Barrington.  Days:  310-451-0693,  eveninj^: 
310-473-4989. 

WSTWD  STUDIO 

One-minule  to  UCLA.  Studio,  $625.  Fur- 
nished, unfurnished,  iaurxiry,  pool.  Parking 
$60/mo.  310-208-2820. .__ 

WSTWD  VILLAGE 

MIDVALE  N.  OF  LEVERING.  EXTRA  LARGE 
U2-B0RMS,  BALCONY,  DINING  ROOM,  3 
CAR  PARKING,  CHARMING,  GARDEN 
APTS.    310-839-6294. 


50  Apartments,  Fumistied 


MAR  VISTA.  $500-$60(ymonlh.  Ask  about 
free  rent.  Attractive,  single/1 -bdrm.  Large, 
pool,  patio,  barbecue  area.  Quiet  building. 
3748  InnlewDod  Blvd.  310^398  8579. 

WESTWOOO.  S895.  Extra  large  1  bedroom, 
walk  to  school  arvd  village.  Available  July  2. 
729  Cayiey.  310-208^798. 

WESTWOOD.  Large  single,  $725,  walk  to 
school. and  village.  Available  June  21st.  667- 
669  LeverinnAve.  310^206-3215. 

WLAr$575/mo.  Ask  about  free  rent. 
Attractive  singles.  Near  UCLA/VA.  Ideal  for 
students.  Suitable  for  two.  Quiet  building. 
1 525  Sawtelle  Bl.  310-477-4832. 


51  Apartments,  Unfurn. 


CULVER  CITY-$875 

Large,  quiet,  modern  2bdrm/2ba.  Patio,  dish- 
washer, refrigerator,  gated  parking.  310-837- 
0761. 

MOVE-IN  SPECIAL 

CHEVIOT  HILLS  ADJACENT.  $895.  Close  to 
campus.  Large  2-bdrrTV2-ba  in  security  build- 
ing. Fully  loaded,  all  amenities.  310-836- 
6007or  310  376  8794. 

PALMS.  3545  Keystone.  2-bedroom/1 -bath 
lower  apartment.  $675/month.  Convenicf>t 
location.  Evenings,  310-275-1427  or  213- 
254-1 565. 

WEST  HOLLYWOOD 

Huge,  bright  2-k>drm/2-ba,  dining,  fireplace, 
laundry,  carport.  Fountain  Crescent  Heights. 
1-year  lease.  Available  now.  SIOOG/mo.  310- 
4389635,310-433-9805. 

WLA-  $695.  2-bdmVl  .5-ba,  dishwasher,  A/C, 
beautiful  carpet,  drapes,  built-int,  balcony, 
high-vaulted  ceilings.  310-670  5119,  310- 
391-7779. 

WLA-$895.  2-BED/SUNNY  UPPER.  CLOSE 
to  UCLA.  Gated,  south  facing  balcony,  r«ew 
carpet/ipaint.   Brockton,  310-390-4610. 


rir»T» 


$425  PALMS 

Oivn  roomA>ath  in  2-be(V2-bath  apartment. 
All  amenities  lrv:luded,  including  parkir^ 
$425/mo.  -f  security  deposit.  Call  Ken  310- 

81 5-9497. 

BRENTWOOD  ADJACENT.  Female.  Own 
room.  CIcanI  Spacious.  1 -block  Wilshire/Bar- 
rington  bus.  Laurviry,  dishwasher,  suryieck, 
large  closet.  $375/month.  310-473-9743. 

BRENTWOOD.  Master  bedroom  and  bath 
available  in  large  3-bdrnV2-ba  w/only  or>c 
housemate.  %*70fmorAh  -fl/2  Uililies.  310- 

826-9117,  Sam.  .r\ 

PALMS.  Must  see.  Owri  BdmVbalh.  Modem 
glat^mirrors.  Black  chrome.  High  ceilings. 
Huge  picture  windows.  Pool,   bar.  Security. 

Extras.  $42SATH>nth.  310^204-31 77. 

WILSHIRE.  Highrisc,  19th  floor.  Spectacular 
view.  Own  small  bdrn^Mlh.  Pool,  Jacuzzi, 
sauna,  parking  available.  $46(Vrnor«h.  Walk 
to  UCLA.  310-474-5093. 


53  Roommates 


424  KELTON,  N/S,  Clean  male.  Share  bed- 
room, large  2>2  apt.  Quiet,  security  bulMlng 
w/pooi,  Jacuzzi.  $4004^  1/4  utillticB.  310-824- 
2293. 

BEVERLY  HILLS 

Own  room  in  2-bedroarrV1-bath  beautiful 
apartntenl.  Lovely  tree- lined  street,  high  ceil- 
ings, kiU  of  window*.  $S0(^nonth.  N/S-  310- 
82S-6S65,  310-772-0432. 


53  Roommatfts 


BEVERLY  HILLS,  Free  rent  in  exchange  ior 
minor  housekeeping  and  chores.  Femaw  pre- 
ferred.  310-289-1404  leave  mesaaKe. 

BRENTWOOD.  Two  roommjies'  looking  (or 
third  to  share  large  3-bedroorTV3-bath  apart- 
ment Laurviry.  Ho  security  depoaK. 
$517Ano.  310-207-1747. 

GRAD.  STUD.  PREF. 

WESTWOOO.  Graduate  student  preferrwi  lo 
shve  2-bedroom/2.S-bath  corvio  with  UCLA 
law  student.  Quiet,  security  bulUing.  2- 
blocks  south  of  village.  Pool,  sauna.  Jacuzzi, 
weight  room.  Private  garage  parking.  Avail- 
able AuKust  IsL  $60(Vmo.  310-477-9427. 


HILGARD  AVE.    Suntmer  and    Fall,    female 
students.  Large  house,  rooms  to  share,  T.V., 
-kHd^en  Jaur>dry,  housekeeper.     Mrs.,  ^al 
310  208  8931. 

MARINA  DEL  REY,  roommate  wanted  to 
share  2bd  townhouse.  Prefer  grad  Uudent  or 
older.  Male  or  female.  $725/mo.  Available 
now.  Call  Brian  310-822-1312. 

NEED  RMMATE  NOW 

LISTEN  TO  ROOMMATE  ADS-  ONLINE. 
Room  ate  Services  900-844-7666.  1.89/89 
for  quick  and  easy  listings  in  your  area. 

PACIFIC  PALISADES.  Own  room  in  2-bcd- 
roorTV2-bath.  2-stories,  hardwood  floors, 
french  doors,  parking  washer/dryer.  N/S  fe- 
male. $60(VWK>nth.  MUST  SEEI  Jennifer,  310- 
459-0042. 

R06tRTS0N/PlC0  AREA.  Own  room  in  2- 
bedroonVI-bath.  $38(ymonth  plus  utilities. 
Water  ir^luded.  Near  stores  and  bus.  5-7 
miles  to  UCLA.  310-559-5962. 

SANTA  MONK>.  Female  musit  student 
wanted  to  share  corxJo.  Own  bedroom 
w/piano.  Fumished  w/private  bath.  $55(Vmo, 
includinK  utilities.  310-B29-4867. 

VENICE.  Nice  area,  female  preferred  to  share 
2-f  1  house  w/22-year  old  female.  W/D.  Hard- 
wood floors,  own  phone.  $500/month.  310- 
822-1166. 

WESTWOOD.  Female  N/S  roommate  want- 
ed. Share  2-bedroom  2-story  apartment.  Own 
room.  Parking,  laundry,  hardwood  floors, 
sundeck,   $60(Vny>nlh    *    half-utilities.    310- 

479^461. 

I  ■■ 

WESTWOOD.  H/S  female  roommate  to  share 
spacious  1 -bedroom  for  upcoming  school 
year.  Security,  clean,  quiet,  pool,  parking. 
$400/mo.  Mary,  3iaB24-4«08. 

WESTWOOD.  Share  spacious  1-bdrnn  apt, 
walk  to  campus,  law  student  preferred,  dis- 
count for  tutoring.  Short-term  ok.  Call  Mike, 
310  209  0968. 

WESTWOOD.  Share  spacious  IbdrnVlbalh 
aparUncnt  in  University  apartments.  Security, 
VC,  furnished.  Female.  $437.5(ymo.  Avail- 
able rviw.  Close  to  Campus  Express.  310- 
208-1865. 

WLA  Two  rooms  available,  $385  and  $365. 
Share  bathroom,  females  preferred,  U/S.  310- 
390-7369,  evenings. 


54  Room  for  Rent 


$445  WESTWOOD 

Walk  to  UCLA.  Large,  sunny  room,  beautiful- 
ly furnishcid,  laundry,  large  closet.  Yard.  Parlc- 
ing,  kitchen,  MALE.  Available  now.  310-475- 
4517.      s_ 

BEVERLY  HILLS 

Own  room  in  2-bedroom  apartment.  Female. 
Excellent  area.  Near  transportation. 
$45(ymooth.  Parking.  310-858-6088. 

BRENTWOOD  LUXURY.  Huge  private  bath- 
room. Furnished,  mini -kitchen,'  private  en- 
trance, hardwood  floors,  cable,  near  bus  arxi 
campus.  Easy  parking.  N/S.  310-4724419. 

BRENTWOOD.  Summer  rental.  Large  room 
on   busline,   pool,  Jacuzzi.   $45(Vmo.    Leave 
passage  after  5pm.  21 3-965-61 51 . 

CHINESE  DISTRICT 

ALHAMBRA-YOU  ARE  CHINESE/YOU  want 
a      Chinese      home.  1 -masterbedroom, 

$65(V$32S  to  share.  1 -shared  single  for 
$250.  Call:81 8-576-2786.    Available  July  1. 

ENCINO.  Two  furnished  bedrooms  for  rent, 
share    bath/utilities,    $500    and    $575.    N/5, 
wall-to-wali  closets,  Tramporlatior^rreways. 
Parking,  laundryAilchen  facilities.   818-784 
3318. 

LUXURY  BEACH  HM 

SANTA    MONICA.    Furnished    master    bed 
room.  All  Amenities.  f^l/S  woman,  profcsslon- 
al/grad  student,  no  pets,  available  June.  $650. 
310459  2109. 

NEXT  TO  MURPHY 

WESTWOOD.  Rooms  in  house.  Quiet,  non- 
smoking female  preferred.  Private-bath,  kitch- 
en, Wash/Dry,  yard,  parking.  $475  A  $.500 
310-279-1436. 

SM  -$390/mo./OBO 

4bd/3ba  house  wAHUGE  living  room,  den.  8- 
minutes  to  UCLA  Near  buses.  Non-smoking 
male  preferred.  Call  hran  •  310-207-3212. 

WESTWOOD,  LARGE  ROOM,  private  bath, 
private  entrance,  furnished,  kitchenette,  clos- 
et Close  to  UCLA  $50Q/W>onth,  310^826- 
8588  am,  or  470-3616  pm. 

WESTWOOD.  Housing  for  mature  students 
at  the  university  religious  conference.  310- 
206-5055. 

WLA:  $350/MONTH 

Male  graduate  student,  f  umisf>ed  tM:droom  in 
private  house.  Quid  lot  studying.  Mi- 
crowave, refrigerator,  near  bus.  Weekly 
cleaning.  310  270  4387. 


1  SPACKDUS  BtDROOM  for  1/2  females. 
Fumished  2bed/2bath,  6/18-6^1.  Walk  to 
campus.  Central  air,  pool/spa,  laundry,  2 
parking  spaces.  $325/pefson.  Call  Kimbcrly 
310-824-2177. 

2- BED/2- BATH.  Close  walk  to  campus,  Mid- 
vale^odchester.  Furnished,  luxurious  apt 
w/Tireplace  and  balcorvy.  Roof-jtop  pool  and 
spa.  2  parking  spaces.  Best  offer.  Call  310- 
479-7513. 

2-BEDROOM/2-BATH.  Spa«ous,  hardwood 
floor,  brightly  lit,  parking  available. 
$140(Vmonth.  July  1  st-September  1st  310- 
824-1212. 

679  GAYLEY.  Need  2  people  for  1  of  2  bed- 
room   fumished  apartment.   Parking,  water, 
cable    included.  Great    locationi  Mid-June-^ 
August  $375ea/monlh.  310-208  5005. 

AMAZING  WESTWOOD.  Wanted:  Up  to  4 
subletters  for  clean  and  bright  2-bed/^-b^th 
Lar>dfair  Apt.  Hardwood  floors,  patio,  park- 
ing. $345/persorVmor^.  Available  July  1st. 
Call  Kevin  310-794-3461. 

ATRIUM  COURT  APT.  2  bed  and  bath,  Ja- 
cuzzi, gyr^Vwelght  room,  A/C,  extra  parking, 
fully  furnished.  $135{Vmo,  or  share.  6/19- 
9/19.  Jason  310-209  6003. 

BEAUTIFUL  GARDEN  APT.  2  bedroom/2  - 
bath,  balcony,  parking  for  sublet  In  summer. 
Flexible  summer  dales.  CHEAP,  CHEAP.  2- 
blocks  from  campus.  Call  31 0-794-4301 . 

BRENTWOOD,  1  bdrm  In  2  bdrm/1  -ba,  fully 
furnished,  bright  apt.  Share/single.  Available 
6/20-9/30.  Pool/laundry,  sundeck,  living 
room  w/guest  couch.  Shared  kitchen. 
$53Q^mo.  incl.  mil.  310-471-1320. 

FML  NEEDED  lo  share  LKG  bdrm  from  mid 
June-mid  Sept.  5  mis  from  UCLA  pool,  A/C, 
balcony.  $225/mlh.  PIz  call  310  262  6851. 

Lg.  1-brdnV1-ba,  wet  bar,  parking.  1-Blk  from 
campus.  Wer>dy/)eMica  209-0262.  Best  offer. 
Looking  for  1-male  or  1 -female  to  share  2- 
bcdroom  2-bdrm/2-ba  apt  in  security  build- 
ing close  to  campus.  $330  each.  Mid-June  to 
Mid  September.  Call  20B-(M04. 

LUXURY  APT. 

WESTWOOD.  New,  security  building  Spa- 
clous  apartment.  2-bdrm,  2-balh.  2  parking 
spots.  Alarm,  microwave.  2  balconies,  frerich 
doors.  Comer  Gaylcy/Keilon.  Price  negoti- 
able. 310-209  1 195. 

MALE  SUBLETTtR  NEEDED.  2  bcdroom/2- 
bath  apartment.  Close  to  campus.  Roof-lop 
pool,  Jacuzzi.  Fully  furnished.  $30(Vmo.  In- 
cluding utilities.  Available  6/1-8^31.  Jeff  or 
Thanh.  310-208-0264. 

OLYMPIC  &  ROBERTSON.  6/23  9/6.  2 
bdrnVl  -bth,  2-car  garage-  $475/mo.  Kim, 
310  657  2105. 

ROOMS  AVAILABLE  ir>  huge  3  bedroom  on 
Veteran.  $450-$750  per  room;  end  of  June-- 
Sept.  Ul.  Kim,  310  208  3710 

SANTA    MONICA    2-bedroom    apt    w/back~ 
yard.  Close   to  beach.  Parking.  SHOtVmonth, 
mid-June    thru     September.    Call    3ia399- 
B897. _;^^_ 

SANTA  MONKIA  Furnished  studio.  Close  to 
beach.  Mid-Juhe  thru  mid  Seolembcr. 
$450/monl'h.  Call  310  450  2856, 


T 


SUBLET  WANTED:  Magazine  seeks  sublet  for 
male  summer  Intcirn.  Own  room,  prefer  own 
bath,  furnished.  Call  Virginia  or  Nick,  310- 
391-2245. 

SUBLintRS  NIL  DEO  LATE  JUNE  TO  MIO- 
Scplcmber.  $140Q/monlh.  2-singlcs,  1 -dou- 
ble. Spacious,  hardwood  floors.  Three  park- 
ing spaces.  Call  310-209-1975  for  more  in- 
formation. 

SUMMER  HOUSE.  2  story.  5  bdrnV3.5  ba. 
Hardwood  floors,  2-blocks  from  class.  4-6 
people.  July- September.  Price  ncrgollable. 
310-824-4978. 

SUMMER  SUBLET  O  679  Gayloy  Need  two 
people  for  1  of  2-bcdroom  furnished  apart- 
ment. Parking  free  cable,  high  ceilings,  se- 
cure. Great  locationi  Mid-June-  end  of  Au- 
gust. $4(XVpcrson  a  month.  Call  310-824- 
5578. 

SUMMER  SUBLET 

WLA    1  -bedroom   apartment  available    rww 
through   September.    10-mtnutcs  from    carrv . 
pus,  beach.  On  busline  tl.  $40(ymonth  in- 

cludes  utilities.  310-82a0649. 

SUMMER  SUBLET.  Across  from  campus.  12 
people  in  security  building.  ASAP.  $338,  June 
free.  Dave  or  Ben  310-209-0129,  818-363- 
1889. 

SUMMER  SUBLET.  Up  to  2  females.  July- 
Aug.  Spacious  2-be<y2-bath,  balcony,  park- 
ing, pool,  and  spa.  5-min.  lo  campua. 
$325/m<Vperson/obo.  310-208-4649. 

SUMMER  SUBLET.  Very  spacious  2  bedroom 
duplex,  fully  furnished,  hardwood  floor,  se- 
curity area.  SiKwr  Lake.  (Sunset  Blvc^lver 
Lake  BKrc^OI  freeway).  Close  to  shopping 
centers.  Also  kleal  (or  Hollywood  A  Down- 
town Inlerrtihipt.  $409-1  person,  $548  total- 
2  peopleAnonth -f  utilHies.  213  663-8912. 

SUMMER  SUBLET:  1  block  from  campus,  2- 
be<V2-bath.  Study  room,  quiet,  fumished. 
Available  mid-June  through  August.  310-471- 
3833. , 

SUMMER  SUBLETS 

5-minutM  to  campus.  Kiiy- September.  1  to  3- 
bedroom  apartments  starting  at  $90(VnrHinlh. 
Laundry  and  parking  available.  310-471- 
4787. 

SUMMER  SUBLETS.  New  buiMing,  3rd  floor, 
3-bdrnV2-ba.  Gated  parking  Next  lo  campua. 
437  Gayley.  Price  negotiable.  3ia824-4978. 


c 


26     Monday,  May  22, 1995 


Daily  Bruin  Classified 


'jb  SuDlet 


WESTWOOD 

Female  roommjie  wanted  ASAP.  2-bdmV1- 
bath.  Share  master  bedroom.  h4o  depocIL 
$30(Vmonth.  May-Augutt  free  cable  and  1/4 
Uilltle«.  Kafgn  3ia209-8240. 

WESTWOOD  SUBLET  from  mid-lurw  to  mid- 
Sept,  (flexible).  2-bedroonV1 -bath,  balcony, 
harcivMKtd  floor,  fpaciout,  parking,  1  -minute 
walk  lo  campu*.  $350  per»orVmontK-4 
spaces  or  vvhoie  SI  27S/monlh.  Call  310-794- 
5004  or  310  794-3784. 

WESTWOOD  SUBLET.  1 -bedroom  availabte 
in  2-bcdroom  apartment.  Fully  furnished, 
parking,  spacious.  5-minutes  to  campus. 
Ophir/ClenKock.  Jur>e  19-mid  Sept., 
S425/month.  )osh-824-1453. 

WESTWOOD  SUMMER  SUBLET.  Female  to 
share  a  spacious  one  bedroom  apartment. 
Parking.  Price  neKotiablc.  310-209-3309. 

WESTWOOD    -SUMMER    SUBLLL-^    2  bed- 


raorTV2-bath,  A/C,  2  secure  parking  spaces, 
Jacuzzi,  cleani  1 -minute  to  campus.  Avail- 
able mid-June  to  end-August.  S1375/mofHh. 

310  208^1627. 

WESTWOOD  SUA^tMER  SUBLET:  Female  to 
share  bedroom  in  2-bed/2-bath.  Fully  fur- 
nished luxury  apartment  w/pool,  Jacuzzi, 
parking.  S32S/mo.  July  and  August.  655  Kel- 

ton  Ave.  310-824  1025. ' 

WESTWOOD  679  GAYLEY,  NEW  SECURITY 
building.  Close  to  campus.  Need  1 -female 
to  share  room  6/1 9-8/30.  $425.  Call  Ele- 
na:310-824-2011. 

WESTWOOD.  1-2  people  to  share  spacious, 
rr\o6ctr\  2-bcdroorTV2-bdth  apartment.  Laun- 
dry, parking  pool/spa.  ^17-^1. 
S32S/monlh,  June  free.  Deposit  $375.  Dia- 
nne,  3ia824-7585. 

WESTWCXiJ).  3  female  roommates  needed. 
2bdrm/2balh.  Spacious  living  room,  refrigera- 
tor, stove,  microwave,  dishwasher,  security, 
balcony,  gated  parking.  CtcnrockA^hir.  Late 

June  Auk  31st.  Joy  310  824-9688. 

WESTWOOD.  3  spaces  available  in  2bdrm, 
2bath  apartmer>t.  1/2-mile  to  campus. 
$325/n>onth  ■fl/4  utilities  each.  Available 
lune  17  August  31.  310-209  0623. 

WESTWOOD.  BRIGHT  SPACIOUS  2 
bdrnV2-ba  apartrrtenl.  3-gated  parking  spots. 
Rooftop  spa.  2-balconies.  Laurviry.  Im- 
maculately clean.  Good  Karmal  Walk-2 
school.  $1225/mo.  310^24-6914. 

WESTWOOD.  FEMALE  ROOMMATE  NEEt> 
ED  ASAP  for  July  arvi  August  in  Tiverton 
Court  $275/monlh.  Share  room  in  2-bed- 
room  apartment.  310-824-1911. 

WESTWOOD.  Female  roommate  needed. 
Summer  ar>d  school  year.  1  -bdrm.  2-roorjv- 
mates.  Close  to  UCLA.  Rent  S300  negotiable. 
Call  Laryssa  208-5025. 


55  Sublet 


WESTWOOD.  CorgBout  2-bdrm  |i|Mi1ment 
near  campu*  needs  up  to  3  females  to  share 
(or  summer.  Parking  availaWe.  Call  208- 
8690. ;__ 

WESTWOOD.  Large  3-bdrm/2-ba,  living 
room.  Dining  room,  kitchen  w/dishwasher,  3- 
space  parking,  laundry  scrvioet,  unfur- 
nished/furnished. 443-1/2  Midvale. 
$200Q/mo.  Contact  Colin,  310-794-4602. 

WESTWOOD.  large  single  to  sublet  July 
&  August.  1 -block  from  campus.  Furnished, 
no  utilities.    Pool,   laundry.  S47S/mo.    Call: 

310-824-4987. 

WESTWOOD.  Sublet  1  bdrm,  gated  parking 
space,  furnished,  pool,  laundry,  A/C.  Water, 
gas,  electricity.  Avail.  July  1-Sept.  IS. 
$81Q/mo  ($405  ea.  for  2).  310-443-8948. 

WESTWOOD.  Sublet  Available  June-August. 
One  spot  to  share.-  Female  Only,  N/5,  3- 
minutes  to  campus,  parking  included.  Ask.  for 
Anne,  310-208-2387  or  leave  messaxe. 


59  House  Exchange 


HOUSE  EXCHANGE,  «/28-7/17  approx- 
imately. Wonderful  Victorian  home  WK^wim- 
ming  pool.  3-bdrm/2-bath.  1-mile  from  the 
beach  in  beautiful  southwest  of  England. 
310-442-9493. 


62  Room/Board  for  Help 


BRENTWOOD.  Male  student  only.  Guest- 
house in  exchange  for  10  hours/week  tutor- 
ing high  school  Chemistry  and  Spanish,  pl^s 
errands.  310-472-2628. 

FREE  TO  MALE  STUDENT  in  exchange  (or 
help,  no  drugs,  available  weekends  arxi 
evenings,  small  private  room.  La  Brea/Venice 
in  Mid<ity  area.  21 3-936-3349. 

FRYMAN  CANYON.  Room/Board  *  SSCVwk 
in  exchange  for  20  hrVwk  babystting,  late  if- 
temoorVearly  evening.  Must  have  own  or. 
Jennifer,  31Q-273-6467.  


56  House  for  Rent 


CULVER  CITY.  3  BEDROC)M/2  BATH,  fami- 
ly room,  hardwood  floors,  Jacuzzi. 
$140(Vmonth.  310-836-3646. 


58  House  for  Sole 


5-BEDROOM,  $475K! 

Santa  Monica  Adjacent.  Huge  5-bedroonV3- 
bath,  two  master  suitesi  Family  room,  hard- 
wood floors,  marble  bath,  great  rwighbor- 
hoodl  310-312-1476. 

DREAM  HOUSE 

CULVER  CITY.  34l.  $214,000.  Beautifully 
upgraded  inA  remodeled.  Hardwood  floors, 
double  garage.  Prudential  California  Realty. 
Agent  310-827-5512. 

FACULTY/STAFF-  Live  in  beautiful  Manhat- 
tan Beach,  'tree  section'  charmer.  Safe,  nice 
rwighborhood,  top  schools,  3-bdrnV2-bath 
4den.  Wood  floor,  skylight,  new  roof,  2-car 
garage.  Private  patio,  gazebo,  beautiful  gar- 
dem.  Must  see  to  appreciate.  $435,000. 
Agent,  310-545-1948. 

GREAT  DEAL!! 

SANTA  MONICA/SUNSET-PARIC  2-bdnn 
4<JerV2-ba  or  3-bdrm/2-ba.  Separate  dining- 
room.  Remodeled  kitchen.  2-car  garage. 
$305,000.  2522  30lh  Street.  310-393-1795, 
714-597-0938. 

HOUSE  PLUS  RENTAL.  Beverly  Glen,  2- 
miles  to  UCLA.  4bdrm/4ba,  $385,000.  Older 
rustic  house,  secluded,  lots  of  trees.  310-276- 
4808. 


HOUSEMOTHER 

Westwood.  Live-in.  Lovely  senior  retirement 
residerKe.  24-hour  light  duties  in  exchange 
for  room,  board,  ^mall  salary.  310-826-3S45. 

PRIVATE  APT. 

SANTA  MONICA.  Near  beach  for  quality,  af- 
ter-school childcare.  Must  love  children,  be 
mature,  extremely  reliable,  have  car.  Prefer 
graduate  student.  Starting  August  or  Septem- 
ber.  Call  Harley,  310-843-4834. 

TEACH  CHINESE? 

Housekeepin^childcare  lor  7-year-old  boy  in 
Beverly  Hills.  Private  roorr^Mth.  Approx- 
imately 204-hr^ivk.  Salary  rwgotiable.  Fe- 
male,  own  car.  310-273-8568. 

WESTWOOD.  Room  and  Board  in  exchange 
for  after-school  child  atK.  Walk  to  IXILA, 
start  summer  or  fall.  310-475-1297. 


63  Sailboats  for  Rent 


ESCAPE-TO-THE-SEA.  Livcaboard  wnaJI  lur- 
nished  sailboat.  Cool  ocean  breezes.  Full-se- 
curity. Microwave,  refrigerator,  telephone- 
capability.  Marina  bathroom^showe»,  100-ft 
away.  $37S^ra.,  includes  utilities.  310-827- 
0497. 


65  Townhouse  for  Sale 


3+2.5+BONUS  RM 

WLA.  Bike  to  UCLA.  Townhouse,  prhrate  ga- 
rage, fireplace.  Fabulous  end  uniti  $239,(X)0. 
Prudential  California  Realty.  Agent,  310- 
827-5512. 


by  Larry  White 


Your  Horoscope 

May  21  thru  27 


PLANETARY  OVERVIEW:  Most  planets  in  "fixed"  signs  indicate  anything 
sounding  "fisky"  may  not  be  accepted  by  others.  Romantic  pursuits  could 
play  an  important  role  for  eligibles.  Sun  moves  into  sign  of  Gemini 
Sunday.  Libra,  Aquarius,  Aries,  Leo,  Sagittarius  and  Gemini's  should 
find  personal  life  more  to  their  liking  now. 

The  AI>VENTURERS  of 


THIS  WEEK  FOR  ALL  SIGNS 

ARIES  .   March  21 -April  20 

TaltTits  and  abilities  brought  to  perfec- 
bon  couJd  payoff  now  Meeting  new 
people  in  work  related  as.s<)ciatioas  will 
opTi  nfw  d<K>rs  of  opportunity 

TAURUS  AprU21-Miy   21 

r>)mestic  life  can  lake  on  new  impor 
tance     Many    may   put   thought   into 
makinK  add Ttionaf  income  from  a  home 


the  Zodiac  are  theRRE 
5IGN5  (Ane^  Leo  and 
Sagittarius).  As  long  as 
there  ar^  newopportu- 
nitl60  to  explore  and 
door3  that  open  into 
the  future  these  signs 

based  IbusinesK  of  their  <iwn  \    VVHI  be  COnXfSn^. 

GEMINI  May22-JUM21 

Happy  Dirthday  season.  Sun  moves 
int<j  your  sign.  Relationships  with 
"significant  others'  and  partnership* 
should  move  in  the  ngtit  direcbon. 

CANCER  Jun«22-July23 

Fk-roming  involved  with  work  groups 
may  brin^  realization  of  hopes  and 
wishes  {>ive  your  imagination  free 
reign.  C  "hanging  times  can  work  f<jr  you! 

LEO  (^^luly  24  -  Augutt  23 

CTiange  may  be  part  of  the  picture  ntjw 
Take  a  chance  on  new  people,  places  or 
job  situations.  Believe  in  yourself  and 
your  abiUbeiH.  Ijsten  to  mtuibon. 

VIRGO  August  24  -  Stpt  23 

Benefiaal  period  for  dificui>smg  and  ne 

fotiabng  career  or  )ob  oppf)rtunibeft. 
imes  of  change  may  bring  new  ways  U.) 
benefit  S<wne  may  w(jrk  ir<»m  home. 

LIBRA  S«flt24-Oct23 

With  a  little  more  effcjrt  h<)pes  and 
wishes  can  become  reality  Finanaal 
connections  with  those  who  arc  in  a 
prwitKjn  tf)  say  "yes '  should  bt!  easier 

SCORPIO  Oct  24-Nov  22 

Attenbon  should  be  directed  towards 
personal  or  business  relabonship  oppor 
lunibes.  If  the  approach  is  tactful,  it  is 
likely  to  bring  the  desired  rcsuiLs 

SAGITTARIUS  Nov  23-Ow:  21 

Mutual  endeavors  with  a  business  part 
net  or  cl<jne  inbmatc  shows  promises  for 
pleasure  or  profit,  fhosc  who  are  flexible 
can  acccjmplish  mf)re 

Your  f^EE  Numerology  P»r»oryml  i—r'  rmpon  of  whm  to  mnpect  In  your  ym  ah«md.  S«ntf  your 
blfthamf  and  a  long  aalt-adttfaaami  32  cant  atampad  anvalopa  lo  COBMIC  COLLEOE  "(Mama  of 
iNa  Publication)    PO   Bon  717.  Manchaatar,  NH   03IOS 


PROFESSOR  COSMO 


CAPRICORN  Dm  22>Jan  20 

linphaHis  should  be  on  love,  fMKjal  gcKxi 
times  and  talent.  A  new  approach  might 
be  more  effecbve  ITie  orcfer  of  the  day  is 
to  start  on  these  things  now 

AQUARIUS  Jan21-F«bl9 

Home  bes  are  emphasi/ed  F'roblems  are 
never  vilved  by  sweepng  them  under  the 
rug.  I  Aicky  you!  With  Jucntcr  in  y our  hopes 
and  wLshcn  sector  ruce  tningscan  happen. 

PISCES  Fab  20-March  20 

Pleasant  surprises  can  come  about  for 
thos«  who  get  involved  with  groups  or 
work  related  assoaabons.  lo  get  places, 
"don't  hide  your  light  under  a  busnel " 


67  Condos  for  Sale 


Westwood  Condo 

Spacious  1 -bdnr\/2-ba.  2  wcurity  parking 
ipacet,  5-bk>cki  to  campus,  pool,  tauna, 
VC,  heat,  24- hr  security  guard,  cable,  laurv 
dry,  appliances,  balcony  view.  Please  call 
310-47S  9231.  Must  leell 


68  Condos  to  Share 


CULVER  CITY.  Near  WIA  College.  Security, 
carport,  pool,  available  6/1 .  S44(Vmo.  N/S  fe- 
male Bruin  fan  preferred.  Michael,  310-637- 
S49b. 


69  Condos  for  Rent 


FAB  FURN  CONDO 

WESTWOOO.  Ibdrm.  Includes  utilties 
pool/jacuz2i/Muna/gym,  24hr  security  build- 
ing/parking. SnCXVmo.  lease,  1440  Veteran. 
Avail.  June.  Pcti  OK.  310-5S3-4227. 

SHERMAN  OAKS.  Bright,  spacious,  2- 
bdrnV2-ba.  Pool,  jacu72l,  fireplace,  balcony, 
rcc  room.,  gated  garage,  AJC,  top  floor,  large 
storage.  S1100/mo.81S-961-1607. 

WSTVVD  CONDO 

1440  VETERAN.  1  bdrm  and  loft/1 -balh 
Available  June.  1-bdrm  arvi  1-bath  available 
September.  Security  parking.  Utilities  includ- 
ed. Pool,  spa,  gym.  Showir  w/appointmeni, 
310-208-3387. 


71  Vacation  Rentals 


BEAUTIFUL  SPACIOUS  YOSCMITE  HOME 
SURROUNfXD  BY  TALL  PINO.  ClOSC  TO 
EVERYTHING.  FULLY  EQUrPED.  S'OOO 
ELEVATION.  OEOC.  REASONABLE  RATES 
81878S-1028  X60303. 

IDYLLWILD 

BEAUTIFUL  ALL  YEAR  RETREAT.  FUUY 
equipped.  Fireplaces,  hot  tub,  sleeps  S-f. 
Daily,  weekly,  monthly.  Call  Emeito. 
Home:31 0  391-6808.  WoHc82S-2S75. 


78  Misc.  Activities 


AUDITIONS:  VocalisU  arxi  musicians  want- 
ed to  form  barvl  (or  contemporary  Chrislian 
church  services  arid  special  events.  310-202- 
8613. 


91   Insurance 


MOTORCYCLE/MOTORSCOOTER  IN- 

SURANCE. Great  rales.  Personal  Scrvtoa. 
MastercarcVVisa  accepted.  Call  (or  quick 
quotes.  C.  Diamond  Inaurarwe  310-428- 
499  S. 


Allstate 

Insurance  Company 
(310)312-0204 

1317  WostwcjorJ  Blvd. 
(?  tjiks   So   of  Wilshlre) 


91   Insurance 


AUTO 
INSURANCE 

''NOBUir 

Best  Prices,  Same  Day 


STUDENT  DISCOUNTS 


Motorcycles,  SR22 
Accidents,  Tickets  OKv. 

CAH  AA*1A  NOW 


rOR  fREE  QUOTE 

TOLL  FRBI 

1  C800I228-9000 


92  Legal  Advice 


TRAFFIC 
TICKETS? 


If  you  get  traffic 
tickets  you  need 
this  information 

You  can  legally 
roquest  traffic 

school  more  than 

once  every  12 

months,  f II  give 

you  step-by-step 

instructions  in 

MMtkiii  how  to  do  this. 


(M* 


LTGAL  MflP  lINf 
1    800-3S8-S07  I 


94  Movers/Storage 


BEST  MOVERS  Spiccc  special  as  low  as 
HAXXi.  No  job  loo  snull.  24ft  tnjck.  Call  us 
first  T-1 63844.  213-263-2378,  213-263- 
BEST.  

HONEST  MAM  W/14lt  truck  and  dollies, 
wnall  jobs,  short  notice  ok.  Student  discount 
310  28S^8688.CA,  AZ,  NV.  CoBmir». 

JERRY'S  MOVING  l>  OaiVERY.  The  caivlul 
W>v*rs.  Experienced,  reliable,  same  day  de- 
livery. Packing,  boxes  available.  |erry,  310- 
391  -5657.  CO  IXIAII 


SUMMER  STORAGE 

*Free  pick  up 
available 
*  Reasonable  rates 

WESTSIDE 
SELF  STORAGE 

826-5900 


94  Movers  storage 


TOM'S  MOVING  SERVICE.  DEPENDABLE, 
EXPERIENCED,  REASONABLL  LAST 
MINUTE  lOBS  WELCOME.  CALL  24  MRS. 
310-397-3607.  ^ 


95  Personal  Service 


Personalized 
Medical  Care 


•  35  years  experience 

•  U.C.  Prucarc  &  other  • 
insurances  accepted 

•Santa  Monica  Hpspital_ 


Attending  Staff 
•  Total  approach  to  health 
&  wellness  utilizing 
innovative  natural 
methods  &  u-aditional 
medicine 

Albert  H.  Lemer  M.D. 

1245  16th  Street.  Suite  I20 
SantH  Monica.  (3IO)  453-2433 


l>(l\viircl  Kntcrpriscs 


VISA  MASTERCARD 
GUARANTEED  APPROVAL 

NO  CREDIT,  BAD  CREDIT,  LOW 

INCOME,  BANKRUPTCY 

S    NO  PROBLEM    H 

CHOOSE  YOUR  CREDIT  LIMIT 

FREE  INFORMATION  WRITE 

1626  N  WILCOX  AVE  1705,  LOS  ANGLES.  CA  90028 


96  Services  Offered 


ATTN:  MBA,  LAW, 
MED.  APPLICANTS 

Fruflritad  davtloping^itlng  your  crMicilly- 
Importanl  paraonal  ttalemcntaf  Cat  profM- 
sional  help,  competHlve  edge  fcpm  natiorul- 
ly-krvawn  author/con<ultar<.  310.a2b-4445 
BE  A  LICENSED  STOCKBROKER  To  tcil 
ftodct,  bontk...  Work  full^Mit  time.  Lksnac 
couTM  aval  labia.  No  prior  audwnic  raquirv- 
ment.  213-462-O101. 

CAU  ME  NOW!  RESUMES,  THESES,  DIS- 
SERTATIONS, SEMESTER  PAPERS,  drafts,  re- 
writes, math  papers,  etc  Many  years  experl- 
erKe,  state  o(  art  equipment  Will  consider 
your  budget.  Please  call  Michelle  Kohn,  213- 
653-0444. 

CONQUER  TEST 
ANXIETY 

Within  hours  with  hypnosis- Improved  rocall- 
Bctter  grades.  Low  group  rales.  310-399- 
0233. 

EAGLE-EYED  PROOFREADER 

EdiU,  theiei/publicatiorw;  tutors  Englith/itudy 
skills;  trains  time  managemcnt/ilress  reduc- 
tion.  Nadia  Lawrence,  PhD.  310-393^1951. 

EXPERIENCED  WRITER/EOITOR  lo  word-pro- 
cess your  draft-lo-rinal  resunrtc,  thesis,  manu- 
script, research  paper.  Quick  lunvarourHl, 
reasonable  rates.  Marlr>a  del  Rcy.  Rcr«c«, 
310-578-1744. 

Prize-Winning  Essayist 

wAwo  PhDs  can  help  you  produce  Wir>nlr^ 
prose.  Theses,  papers,  personal  statements. 
David  310-459-8068,  310-459-3139. 


Research,  Writing,  Editing 

ALL  levels, '  ALL  fiubjects  ForeJKn 

Students  Welcdme  Fast  Professional  - 

Quality  guaranteed  papcrx  not  for  sale 

Call  Research  310-477-8226 

M-F  I0:00am-5:00pni 


BEAR'S  RESEARCH. 
WRITING  &  EDITING 

AN  subjects  Thetea/Disseflations 

Persorul  Statementa  Proposals  and  books. 

Inlernatk>nal  studisnls  wefcome. 

SINCE  1B66 

Sharon  Bear,  Ph.D.  (310)  470-6662 


MODERN  SECRETARIAL  SfRVICES.  24  hour 
service,  pick-up  and  delivery,  IBM  and  MAC, 
Laser  printing.  Discount  students.  S-minutes 
from  UCLA.  310-446-8899. 

TYPE  ESSAYS,  TERM  PAPERS,  THESES  AND 
dissertations.  S1.5<y|paKe.   213-734-6547. 

WORD  PROCESSING  specializing  In  theses, 
disiertatiom,  transcription,  resumes,  fliers, 
brochures,  mailing  lists,  reporu.  Santa  Moni- 
ca, 3ia828-6939.  Hollywood,  213-466- 
2888. 

WORD  PROaSSINC-  All  types,  APA  and 
other  formats,  transcribing,  resumes,  DTP, 
WordPerfect,  charts,  graphs,  laser.  Reason- 
able rates,  near  campus.  310-470-0287.   , 


Dariy  Bruin  Sports 


Monday,  May  22, 1995    27 


SOFTBALL:  Brundage  breaks  records  for  home  runs,  RBIs  In  Bruin  victories 

From  page  32 


hit  in  five  innings. 

The  second-ranked  Bruins  faced 
No.  1 3  Hawaii  in  the  second  round 
of  the  double-elimination  tourna- 
ment on  Saturday,  cruising  to  a  9-0 
victory  with  Harding  on  the 
mound.  UCLA  took  an  early  lead 
in  the  bottom  of  the  first  after 
junior  Kelly  Howard  and  Brundage 
wpre  walked.  Sophomore  Alleah 
Poulson  doubled  to  right-center 
and  the  Bruins  went  up.  2-0. 

In  the  fourth,  UCLA  picked  up 
another  run  off  singles  by  short 
stop  Nicole  Odom,  Ginny  Mike 
^nd  Howard,  who  picked  up  an 
RBI  with  her  second  hit  of  the 
game. 

The  Bruins  capped  the  scoring 


with  a*  six-run  sixth  inning,  thanks 
in  large  part  to  two  Rainbow 
errors. 

After  Jennifer  Brewster  reached 
base  on  a  fielder's  choice,  senior 
Felicia  Cruz  was  safe  on  an  error 
by  third  baseman  Cathy  Turner. 
Both  runners  then  advanced  on  a 
wild  pitch  and  Brewster  scored  on 
a  second  wild  pitch. 

With  two  outs  and  UCLA  up  6- 
0,  Harding  blasted  her  eighth  home 
run  to  right  field,  scoring  Brundage 
and  Kathi  Evans. 

The  Bruins  (46-6  overall)  met 
the  Rainbows  (47-21)  again  in  yes- 
terday's regional  finals.  However, 
the  Hawaii  team  that  showed  up 
Sunday  was  a  much  worthier 


opponent. 

UCLA  again  capitalized  on 
Hawaii  errors,  scoring  an  unearned 
run  in  the  top  of  the  first  and  two  in 
the  third  off  Rainbow  pitcher 
Brooke  Wilkins. 

But  with  sophomore  B'Ann 
Bums  on  the  mound  in  the  bottom 
of  the  fourth  and  UCLA  up  3-0, 
the  Rainbows  put  together  a  rally 
to  get  themselves  back  into  the 
game,  3-3. 

"Our  players  kept  plugging," 
Hawaii  head  coach  Bob  Coolen 
said.  "We're  capable  of  hitting,  it's 
just  a  matter  of  having  that  mind-^ 
.set." 

With  the  momentum  appearing 
to  be  in  Hawaii's  favor,  the  Bruins 


came  out  in  the  fifth  and  turned  it 
around  with  a  double  by  Howard 
and  an  RBI  .single  by  Brundage  to 
give  the  lead  back  to  UCLA  for 
good,  4-'!^, 

"We  didn't  get  nervou.s  after  los- 
ing a  3-0  lead,"  Brundage  said. 
"We  might  have  ca.sed  up  a  little 
bit.  Today  was  definitely  a  w^ke- 
up  call." 

Harding  replaced  Burns  in  the 
fourth  inning,  allowing  just  one  hit 
to  record  the  save.  Bums  improves 
to  23-5  with  the  win. 

ByAvinning  the^outh(irn 
Regfonal,  UCLA  joins  the  seven 
other  regional  winners  in  the  World 
Series  next  week  in  Oklahoma 
City. 


Jennifer  Brundage 


UCLA  SpOfIs  Into- 


96  Services  Offered 


96  Services  Offered 


105  Travel 


^  |5|  O  IslisI  Isl  Isl  01  Is!  O  Isl  Olsl  Isl  Isllsl  Isl  O 


U 


3  DO  YOU  NEED  BRACES?  u 


^  UCLA  ORTHODONTIC  CLINIC  IS  OFFERING  hi 
|g|  f/f££  EVALUATIONS  EXAMS 

g|  THROUGH  JUNE  1995 

§  **$20  value**  O 

^  TREATMENTIIt^ILABLE  g 

|g|  CALL  310/825-5161  to  schedule  an  appointment  I3| 
1^  UCLA  SCHOOL  OF  DENISTRY  |S| 

siiq||G||Gi|G|OOl5lIslOIslIslOIslIslOlsllsl 


96  Services  Offered 


102  Music  Lessons 


PROFESSIONAL  WRmNCVEOmNC.  Papers,      GUITAR  LESSONS    by  a  profeuional   near 
reports,  tlatittict,  propotalt,  tludiet,  projecU,       UCLA.  All  leveit,  guiUrt  available.  Call  Jean 
Masters,  Ph.D.  dissertations,  college  applica-       310-476-4154. 
lion  eMayt.  Any  subject,  style,  requirement. 
213-871-1333. 


RESEARCH 


Medical,  Legal,  etc.  Experience  w/all  UCLA 
llbrariet.  Writing,  Photography,  Editing  also. 
Well-knoMm  references.  Call  Robert  at 
GOtOEN  RETRIEVER,  310-39S-368S. 

WANT  TO  BE  ACCEPTED?  Save  lime,  frustra- 
tion?  Call  fcK  help  developing/editing  persorv 
al  (Utamanto.  Also  edit  papers,  thcMs,  dis- 
sert^ont.  Linda  310-392-1734. 

"A"  IN  CLASS- 
FLUNKING  LIFE? 

ACADEMIC-FINANCIAL  CHECK.UPS.  DR. 
STANTON,  PHD.  LK3.A  CUM  LAUDE.  CRE- 
V  88%.  INTERNATIONAL  SINCE  1982. 
$1/MIN-  UCLA  CALLS  ONLY.  310-477- 
9147. 


98  Tutoring  Offered 


-MY  TUTOR-  MATH/PHYSICS/STATISTICS. 
Tutoring  lerice.  Free  consultation.  Reasorv 
able  rates,  call  ar>y(lme.  Computeriied  statis- 
tical analysis  available.  Han  (800)90-TUTOR. 

INT'L  STUDENTS 

Spand  your  break  practicing  English  In  F/T  In- 
tensive courses  at  Anglo-Continental.  For 
more  Information,  call  909-621-4434. 

MATH  TUTORING  by  PH.D.  S2(Vhour.  Cal- 
culus, statistics,  probabilily,  math  for  physi- 
cal/social sciences,  SAS,  ORE,  SI>SS,  MCAT. 
310-837-0998,  pajeer,  310-582-9626  NBD. 


104  Resumes 


WINNING  RESUMES 

1-hour  service.  Our  clierUs  get  results.  Open 
7  day*.  Visa  and  Mastercard  accepted.  310- 
287-2785. 


*makc  professional  quality 
resumes  -  everytimc  !!!* 

'on    TCMVIATC     ANO    MANUAL 
/•tMO    $S    CHICK    OB     MONCT    OnOCR    TO 

TRUaoS  CX}.  P.O.  Bon  20206  Um^  UadS,  CA 
90801-4206 


99  Tutoring  Needed 


RUSSIAN  TUTOR  NEEDED.  1  hour/S<veek  on 
or  ntu  campus.  Will  pay.  Call  Angela  310- 
794-3033. 


100  Typing 


A  CLASS  ACT 

Papers,  Icaars,  mumes,  scripts,  transcription, 
labels.  FREE  llgN  editing.  Laser  printing.  Spell 
check.  Fax  Orders  Welconf»e.  3ia827-8023. 

ACE  TYPIST,  ETC 

GREAT  LOOKING  WP-ALL  TYPES- 
RESUMES,  APPLICATIONS  (INCL.  AN4CAS), 
ETC.  SPECIAL  RATE  FOR  PAPERS.  FAST, 
FRIENDLY  SERVICE.  RUSHES.  310-82a 
M30. 


102  Music  Lessons 


DRUM  LESSONS 

Alt  levclt/styles  with  dedicated  professional. 
At  your  home  or  WLA  studio.  1  st  lesson  free. 
No  drum  set  necessary.  Nell  21 3-658-5491 . 
GUITAR  INSTRUCTION.  15  years  EXP.  all 
levels  and  styles.  Patient  and  organljed. 
Guitars  available.  Sam  310-826-91 1 7. 


105  Travel 


EUROPE,  $249  ohr*.  CARIBBEAN/MEXICO, 
S249  rA.  NYC,  $129.  K  you  can  beat  these 
prices,  start  your  own  damn  airline.  Air- Tech 
Ltd.,  310-472-0866.  info«aerotechxam. 


STUDENT 

TRAVEL 


London $573 

Paris $640 

Madrid \ $732 

Frankfurt $549 

Copenhagen $824 

Athens $830 

Tel  Aviv. $935 


PricM  ir(  roundtrip  Tik  no)  indudrd 
femr  rfftriciioni  apply 


STA  TRAVEL 

We've  been  there. 

920  Westwood  Blvd. 

Lob  Anoeleb,  Ca  9002* 

310-824-1S74 


Paris  $195* 

Amsterdam  $265* 

Honolulu  $145* 

New  York  $149* 

Boston  $184* 

'Fares  ore  e«ch  ««/  from  Los  Angeles  baaed  on  a 
romdlrppifchase  Restrictiansappt/andlMesnai 
jncluded    Call  for  other  worldwi^  destnatoK 

Open  Saturdays  10am  -  2pm 

Council  'h'avel 

1093  Broxton  Ave ,  #220,  Los  Anaete,  CA  90094 

310.208-3551 


Eurailpasses 


109  Autos  for  Sale 


1986  MAZDA  323,  white,  automatic,  AAI, 
Mereo,  low  mileage,  runt  great,  $289S/obo. 
310-824-0714. ■ 

GREAT  BMW 

'86  BMW.  Charcoal  Grey.  5-speed.  2-door. 
Excellent  condition.  105K  milet.  $7900.  310- 
477-9427. 

LOW  MILEAGE 

•93  M£RCURy  TRACER.  4.door,  10K  miles, 
loaded,  automatic.  Original  owner. 
Sa00(Vobo.  310-842-8403. 

PLYMOUTH  LASER 

^91  RS  MODEL.  16-v.  OOHC-engine.  Power 

everything.  irx:ludet  CD-player,  alarm.  Only 
SSKmilet.  Excellent  corxiition,  1  .owner. 
SOSOQ^obo.  310-824.2997. 


VW  FOX,  white,  2-door,  1988,  4-ipeed, 
88,000  mile*,  4-speaker  radio,  excellent  rurv 
ninn  condition,  S2550.  213-8831762. 

'85  MITSUBISHI  TRtDIA-L.  AUTO.  GOOD 
cor^dition  w/ac  Low  mileage,  graduating  lo 
muHtelll    $1800.  310-479  4831. 

'87  TOYOTA  CELICA.  Top  condition.  BIk. 
75K  ml,  SSaOO.  310-394-7846,  310^820- 
8062.  Ten  M-F,  8-6,  Sal  1 2-5. 


1 1 5  Scooters  for  Sof© 


1989  BLACK  HONDA  ELITE  SOE,  excellent 
condition,  wAMtimet  and  Kryptonite  lock. 
SSOO.  Call  Sutan,  310-208-3334. 

HONDA  ELITE  SO,  1989.  Red,  2  helmets,  un- 
der  2000  miles.  Excellent  cwKJition,  runs 
great,  like  new.  )600.  Mvde,  310-208- 
2717. 

STOP  WALKING! 

1986  Honda  Elite  80.  Runs  vxi  looks  greati 
Only  6300  miles.  Includes  two  helmets  and 
lock.  SSOjVobo.  310-8241  381. 

'89  HONDA  ELITE  80.  White,  runs  great, 
well  mainUined.  %b50/obo.  Call  Mff,  310- 
208-0264. 


126  Furniture  for  Sale 


BIG  BLOWOUT 

Desks,  chairs,  bookshelves,  couch,  every- 
Ihlnfi,  must  >to.  Call  Robin  at  310  275-28S8. 

MATTRESS  SETS:  Twin  $89,  Full  $99,  Queen 
SI  49.  King  SI 69,  B4inkfacds.  Delhrerlcs, 
Phone  Orders  Acc<rp<«d.  310-372-2337. 

REDUCED:  CREAM  LEATHER  SOFA,  S4S0. 
Oak   shalvM,    S1 15.   New   Mountain   bike.' 
S240.  310-274-4025. 

USED  QUEEN-SIZE  WATERBEO.  Working 
he^cr.  SI 00.  Like  new.  3I0-37S-6037. 


128  Misc.  for  Sale 


SLAVOPHILES:  For  sale    Soviet  era  posters 
and  other  objects.  Qavid  21 3-666-9960. 


129  Musicallnstruments 


MUST  SELL 

7-FT  fcRAND  PIANO.  1927  MASON  HAM- 
LIN. Ebony.  Excellent  condition.  $14,000 
obo.  818-880-9061. 


134  Computer/Typewriter 


C386SSX,  5  1/4  and  3  1/2  floppy  drive*.  BCA. 
Color     monitor,    Windows,     WP,     WORD. 
$40(yobo.  Elaine,  21  3-299-2523. 

MAC  CLASSIC 

4MB  RAM.  250^<6  harddrive,  w/Deskwriter 
printer.  Includes  Microsoft  Word  w/origlnal 
bojtes.  Excellent  condition.  ibOO/obo.  3ia 
824-2997. 


MACINTOSH  2Si.  Color  monitor,  Stylewriter 
H    Laser  printer.    Brand    new,  hwdly   used., 
$  1  SOtVobo.  3 1  a824- 1 30 1 . 


TODAY'S 
CROSSWORD  PUZZLE 


ACROSS 

1   SoftdrJnk 

4  Editor  —  Gurley 

Brown 
9  Change  sides 

(of  the  street) 

14  Inventor 
Whitney 

15  Worship 

1 6  Major  artery 

1 7  Partner  of  jeans 

1 8  Book  borrower's 
need 

20  Restaurants 

22  Domicile:  abbr. 

23  "—  Abner" 

24  Ran 

26  Actress  —  Ryan 

27  Catch  sight  of 

28  Amateur  radio  . 
operators 

29  Taking  on  cargo 

32  —  and  only 

33  Actor  Jamie  — 

34  Docked 

38  By  way  of 

39  Helped  a  felon 

41  Overwhelm 

42  Rich  pastry 

44  Charged 
particles 

45  Half  a  score 

46  Not  subtle 

48  Gentlemen 

49  Soft  drink 

52  Sportscaster 
Meredith 

53  Gardening  aid 

54  Gonlla,  e.g. 

55  Fiery 

56  VII 

59  Measure  of 

warmth  . 
62  Nest-ega  inits 

65  Nearer  the  facts 

66  Actor  Greene 

67  Neither  fish  — 
fowl 

68  Knitters'  needs 

69  Clear  the  floor 

70  Ruby,  e  g 

T 


PREVIOUS  PUZZLE  SOLVED 


B 


N 


OHO 


R 


M 


R 


O 


U 


R 


8 


B 


M 


0 


R 


N 


N 


B 


O  1996.  UnHad  feature  Syndicale 


DOWN 

1  Caress 

2  "Grand  — 
Opry- 

3  Bit  by  bit 

4  50  percent 

5  Actress 
Adams 

6  Tosses 

7  Miscalculate 

8  Approached 

9  Low-lying 
islands 

10  Bird  of  fable 

1 1  Some  exams 

12  Runway 

13  Unhappily 
19  Military  unit 
21  Commercials 

24  Jostle 

25  Take  fright 

26  "Red  Planet " 
denizen 

27  Id's  counterpart 

29  Type  of 
retriever 

30  Metal -bearing 
rock 


31  lr>dicales 

agreement 
33  Go  kaput 

35  Meting  out 

36  Pitchers 

37  Tightly 
packed 

40  Large  weight 
43  Middle  Eastern 

garment 
47  Adds  up 


-Devil" 


Spil 
Mu! 


tusical 
drama 
51  Large-eyed 
monkey 

55  His  and  — 

56  Certain 

57  Sea  eagle 

58  Gore,  to 
Clinton 

60  Permanent 
marker 

61  Haul 

63  Fish  eggs 

64  Limb 


w 


ifl  m  w^  in 


28    Monday,  May  22, 1995 


Daily  Bruin  Sports 


W,  TENNIS 

From  page  32 

players  suffered  from  the  jitters. 
Pace  committed  five  errors  to  sur- 
render the  first  game  and  Phebus  fol- 
lowed with  two  double  faults  to  give 
the  break  right  back. 

Phebus  settled  tiown  to  win  the 
next  two  games,  mostly  on  Pace 
miscues.  Then  the  6-foot,  1-inch 
Phebus  planted  a  lob- over  the  5-9 
Texas  senior  to  take  a  4- 1  lead  and 
cruise  to  a  one  spt  advantage. 

"I  wouldn't  mind  borrowing  a 
couple  of  Keri's  inches  to  reach 
some  of  those  lobs."  Pace  said. 

Improved  fifsfserves  and  two 
Phebus  double  faults  gave  the 
Longhorn  an  early  2-0  lead  in  the 
second  set.  But  Pace  fell  behind  0-4() 
in  the  next  game  and  lost  her  serve 
when  she  sailed  an  overhead  long. 

Just  when  the  momentum  seemed 
to  shift.  Pace  got  a  break  from  the  net 
cord.  The  Texas  senior  reached  up 
Tor  a^Phebus  lob  and  barely  got  the 
racket  frame  on  the  ball.  The  shot 
trickled  onto  the  tape  and  fell  over, 
helping  Pace  to  a  3- 1  advantage. 

At  the  All-American  toumament, 
Pace  used  the  tape  to  pull  away  from 
the  Newport  Beach  native.  Phebus 
seemed  to  have  a  Pace  passing  shot 
covered  for  3-3  in  the  first  set,  when 
it  ticked  the  cord  and  skipped  over 
the  racket.  Pace  fired  up  and  took 
nine  of  the  final  1 0  games. 

The  Alabama  native  seemed  to  be 
warming  up  again  on  Sunday,  lead- 
ing 30-15  in  the  fifth  game.  But  after 
two  Pace  errors  set  up  break  point, 
Phebus  buried  a  second  serve  down 
the  line  to  put  the  nail  in  Pace's  cof- 
fin. 

"1  had  to  do  it  there,  or  she'd  get 
going,"  Phebus  said.  "When  she  gets 
confident,  she  can  mn  off  1 2  games 
in  a  row." 


Instead,  it  was  the 'Bruin  junior 
who  made  the  clinching  run,  win- 
ning the  last  five  games  to  take  the 
title.  When  Pace  returned  a  Phebus 
serve  wide  at  match  point,  the  Bruin 
junior  raised  her  arms  to  the  sky 
before  rushing  to  embrace  her 
Longhorn  adversary. 

Phebus  saved  her  best  for  the  last 
match,  passing  Pace  on  numerous 
occasions  including  a  few  while  on 
the  run.  She  also  cut  down  on  the 
mistakes,  committing  only  four  dou- 
bles faults  as  oppo.sed  to  17  and  10 
in  two  previous  matches  at  the  tour- 
nament. 

"The  plan  was  to  move  Keri  with 
the  forehand  with  the  idea  of  attack- 

+RO  Kfri*';  harkhand  and  petting  to 

the  net,"  Texas  head  coach  Jeff 
Moore  said.  "Kelly  executed  well 
today,  but  Keri  was  just  flawless." 

Pace's  slice  backhand  was  not  a 
big  factor  in  the  match,  mainly 
because  Phebus  went  down  to  get 
the  low  ball  and  keep  it  in  play. 

"You  have  to  be  disciplined 
enough  to  stay  low,"  Phebus  said.  "I 
was  telling  myself  the  whole  time, 
'Stay  low,  stay  low,'  but  there  were 
times  where  my  knees  didn't  want  to 
bend  and  that's  where  I  had  to  kick 
myself." 

Ninety  minutes  after  bagging  the 
singles  title,  Phebus  got  to  work  in 
doubles.  She  and  Starrett  entered  as 
the  top  seed  in  the  bracket  against 
No.  2  Pace  and  Moros. 

Starrett's  quest  for  a  title  began 
while  she  was  still  a  freshman  at 
Indiana,  during  a  practice. 

"I  told  the  assistant  coach  that  my 
goal  is  to  win  a  national  doubles 
championship,"  Starrett  said.  "But 
he  just  laughed  in  my  face." 

She  transferred  to  UCLA  two 
years  ago  and  saw  her  chance  to 
reach  that  goal  with  Phebus.  When 
the  Aurora,  111.,  native  eyed  a  floater 
at  match  point,  Starrett  had  the  last 


Daily  Bruin  Sports 


FREU  HE 

UCLA's  Keri  Phebus  (facing  forward)  and  Susie  Starrett  embrace  after  the  pair  defeated  Texas' 
Kelly  Pace  and  Cristina  Moros,  6-3,  6-3  for  the  1995  NCAA  doubles  championship. 


laugh,  smashing  it  down  the  alley  to  great  to  be  associated  with  the  best 

give  the  Bmins  a  sweep  of  the  indi-  tennis  program  in  the  nation  ai)d  that 

vidual  titles.  means  the  most  to  me." 

Though  it  wasn't  the  best  way  to         While  the  Bruins  didn't  win  the 

end  her  career.  Pace  leaves  Texas  team  title,  Phebus'  success  bodes 

content  with  what  she  accomplished  well  for  the  UCLA  program, 
this  week  at  Pepperdine  -  helping         "It's  a  big  step  forward,"  Zaima 

the  Longhoms  to  a  national  title.  said.  "As  Keri's  dad  said,  we  hope 

"It's  disappointing  not  to  win  the  there  are  200  or  300  juniors  players 


model  out  there  representing 
UCLA." 

As  for  Phebus,  nothing  would 
please  her  more  than  to  share  a 
national  title  with  her  teammates 
next  year. 

But  for  now,  Phebus  will  enjoy 
the  fruits  of  her  individual  success, 
which  includes  a  berth  in  the  U.S. 


individuals,"  Pace  said.  "But  it's     looking  at  Keri  Phebus  seeing  a  role     Open  in  early  September. 


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Monday,  May  22, 1995    29 


.TRACK 


From  page  32 

best  attitude  that  I've  seen  in  the  1 1 
years  that  I've  been  out  there." 

UCLA's  Ato  Boldon  and  John 
Godina  combined  for  40  of  the 
Bruins'  163.5  points,  with  both  ath- 
letes easily  notching  doubles.  For 
Godina,  his  double  in  the  shot  put 
and  the  discus  was  his  third  in  the 
last  three  years.  This  year,  however, 
the  senior  set  the  meet  record  iy 
both  events.  y/^ 

Godina's  mark  of  21 1  feet,  nine 
inches  iij  the  discus  topped  the 
nearest  competitor  by  almost  30 
feet,  while  his  mark  of  71-4  3/4  in 
the  shot  was  over  10  feet  better 
than  the  second  place  throw. 

His  performance  in  the  shot  put 
currently  places  Godina  first  in  the 
world. 

"I  didn't  really  get  a  hold  of  that 
throw,"  said  Godina,  who  was 


throwing  74  ^t  in  his  warm-ups. 
"There  wasn't  anything  super- 
human about  my  performance.  It's 
what  I  should  have  been  doing  a 
long  time  ago.  But  I'm  going  to  try 
to  improve  on  that.  I  still  haven't 
found  the  throw  that  Irm  looking 
for."  f 

"'  'In  the  sprints,  Boldon  also  made 
an  impact  upon  the  world  rankings, 
running  the  100-meters  in  10.08 
seconds  and  running  the  200m  in 
just  20.08  seconds.  Both  marks  are 
the  fastest  non-wind-aided  times  of 
the  year,  and  his  time  in  the  200m 
shatters  the  former  UCLA  record 
of  20.18,  set  in  1988  by  Henry 
Thomas. 

Even  so.  Smith  feels  that  Boldon 
has  more  to  accomplish. 

"I  told  him  to  remember  that  this 
was  a  stepping  stone  to  a  national 
championship,"  Smith  said.  "I  told 
him,  'You  have  one  school  record, 
but  you  don't  have  two.  You  have 
one  national  record  for  Trinidad, 


but  you  don't  have  two.'  I  want  him 
to  enjoy  it  for  a  moment,  but  we 
still  have  w6rk  to  do." 

In  other  events,  UCLA's  Greg 
Johnson  threw  the  javelin  252-1, 
which  is  a  meet  record  and  the  sec- 
ond longest  throw  of  all  time  by  a 
Pac-10  athlete.  Johnson's  mark 
puts  him  second  in  the  NCAA,  just 
five  feet  behind  the  leader. 

"He  had  the  meet  of  his  life," 
said  UCLA  throwing  coach  Art 
Venegas.  "He  hit  248  on  his  open- 
er, which  would  have  won,  but 
what  was  really  impressive  was 
that  he  hit  his  252  after  a  long 
break  between  his  first  three  throws 
and  the  finals." 

Also  impressive  at  the  Pac-IOs 
was  freshman  high  jumper  Rich 
Pitchford,  who  jumped  7-2  1/2  to 
win  the  title.  Pitchford  cleared  the 
height  on  his  second  attempt,  but 
just  missed  clearing  7-3  3/4,  a 
height  that  would  have  earned  a 
spot  in  the  NCAAs. 


John  Godina 


UCLA  Sports  Into 


UCLA  Sports  Info 


Other  noteworthy  times  and 
marks  for  the  Bruins  include  a  sec- 
ond-place finish  by  Ibrahim 
Hassan  in  the  400m  (45.48,  auto- 
matic NCAA  qualification),  a  sec- 
ond-place finish  by  Jonathan 


Ato  Boldon 

Ogden  in  the  shot  put  (61-3  1/2) 
and  a  second-place  finish"  by  the 
4x1 00m  relay  team  (39.46). 

Oregon  placed  second  with  a 
team(jotal  of  142.5.  while  USC  fin- 
ished third  with  a  score  of  122. 


W.  tRACK:  Bruins  overcome  Oregon  on  second  day  of  competition,  win  title 

From  page  29      ^ 


California  was  third  with  81. 

"Saturday  morning,  we  knew 
what  we  had  to  do,  so  I  didn't  have 
to  give  a  big  speech  at  the  team 
meeting,"  UCLA  head  coach 
Jeanette  Bolden  said.  "I  just  told 
the  team,  'If  Oregon  is  going  to 
challenge  us,  they're  going  to  have 
to  be  on  top  of  their  game  and  then 
some,  because  we  are  going  to 
push  it.  We're  not  going  to  give  up 
a  point,  we're  not  gonna  give  up 
anything.'" 

If  Bolden's  words  weren't 
enough,  the  Bruins  had  been 
inspired  for  Saturday's  fmals  by 
two  outstanding  performances 
Friday.  UCLA's  first  points  of  the 
meet  came  Friday  evening  from 


sophomore  Amy  Acuff,  who  won 
her  second-consecutive  high  jump 
championship  with  a  collegiate 
record  leap  of  6-feet,  6-inches. 

Not  to  be  outdone,  junior 
Valeyta  Althouse  stepped  into  the 
shot  put  ring  shortly  after  Acuff 's 
victory  and,  on  her  first  throw, 
launched  a  collegiate  record  of  her 
own. 

The  defending  champion's  shot 
flew  61-10  1/4,  shattering  the 
American  collegiate  record  of  59- 
1 1  she  set  April  29. 

"Valeyta  and  Amy  really  set  the 
tone  by  capturing  two  collegiate 
records,"  Bolden  said.  "That  was 
like  a  big  catapult  for  everybody, 
and  it  inspired  so  many  people." 


The  inspiration,  however,  came 
in  more  than  one  form.  By  winning 
her  second  straight  shot  put  title, 
Althouse  defeated  fifth-year  senior 
teammate  Dawn  Dumble.  It  was 
the  first  time  that  Dumble,  who  fin- 
ished second  with  a  throw  of  58-0 
1/2,  had  ever  lost  a  Pac-10  title. 

"That  was  Valeyta's  meet  - 
there's  no  two  ways  about  it," 
UCLA  throwing  coach  Art  Venegas 
said.  "It  was  a  real  good  victory  for 
her,  but  Dawn  looked  pretty  shaken 
after  that. 

"So  I  just  said  to  Dawn,  'Look, 
come  out  Saturday,  you're  a  fifth- 
year  senior  and  you're  ready.  Let's 
take  care  of  the  discus.'" 

Dumble  did  just  that,  hurling  a 


conference  record  throw  of  1 99-9 
on  her  first  attempt.  That  mark  was 
easily  good  enough  for  first  place, 
and  Dumble's  closest  competitor, 
teammate  Suzy  Powell,  managed  a- 
throw  of  only  178-6. 

Freshman  Nada  Kawar,  who 
completed  a  1-2-3  UCLA  sweep  in 
the  shot  put  with  a  mark  of  51-3, 
threw  the  discus  162-2  and  finished 
fifth. 

On  the  track,  senior  Shelia 
Burrell  won  her  first  ever  Pac-10 
individual  title  with  a  narrow  victo- 
ry in  the  100-meters.  then  ran  a  leg 
on  UCLA's  second-place  1,600 
relay.  That  team,  also  including 
Camille  Noel,  Dariene  Maico  and 
Cicely  Scott,  finished  in  a  season- 


best  3:33.17,  thus  earning  itself  an 
automatic  qualification  to  thre 
NCAA  outdoor  meet. 

Senior  Karen  Hecox  failed  to 
defend  her  title  in  the  "3,000  and 
finished  second  Friday,  but 
rebounded  in  time  for  a  victory  in 
the  1,500  Saturday.  Junior  Shelley 
Taylor  was  also  a  distance-event 
winner,  capturing  first  place  in  the 
5.000  in  16:56.88. 

Scott  finished  second  in  the  800 
in  2:07.94,  and  freshman  Bisa 
Grant  solidified  her  NCAA  provir 
sional  qualification  in  the  100- 
mcter  hurdles  with  a  13.55  -  good 
enough  for  a  third  place  finish. 
Burrell  was  fourth  in  the  100  hur- 
dles with  a  time  of  13.57. 


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30    Monday,  May  22, 1995 


Daily  Bruin  Sports 


Barkley  announces 
retirement  after  loss 


By  Mel  Reisner 

The  Associated  Press 

PHOENIX  —  Charles 
Barkley  announced  his  retire- 
ment after  the  Phoenix  Suns 
were  ousted  from  the  NBA 
playoffs  Saturday,  but  once 
again  he  refused  to  be  unequiv- 
ocal. 

"I'll  tell  you  the  same  thing  I 
told  the  Tcanraftcrlhc  game  "  a 
dejected  Barkley  said.  "More 
than  likely,  I  have  played  my 
last  game.  There's  no  soul- 
searching.  It's  not  even  a  big 
deal.  I'm  not  saying  it's  100 
percent,  but  I'm  pretty  sure 
about  things  right  now." 

"It's  just  time.  I  had  my 
mind  made  up  most  of  the  sea- 
son, and  I've  been  feeling  this 
way  for  the  last  six  months." 

J^arkley,  32,  who  led  the 
Phoenix  Suns  through  three  of 
their  most  memorable  seasons, 
made  his  announcement  min- 
utes after  the  Houston  Rockets 
defeated  the  Suns  1 15-1 14  in 
Game  7  of  the  Western 
Conference  semifinals,  deny- 
ing Barkley  what  may  have 
been  his  final  quest  to  win  a 
championship  ring. 

He  declined  to  answer  ques- 
tions about  his  left  knee,  which 
bothered  him  throughout  the 
game,  although  he  finished 
with  18  points  and  23 
rebounds. 

Team  president  Jerry 
Colangelo  said  he  hadn't 


talked  to  Barkley  about  the 
future,  but  wouldn't  try  to  coax 
the  nine-time  All-Star  back  for 
a  1 2th  season. 

"If  he  wants  to  retire,  I'm 
not  going  to  discourage  him," 
Colangelo  said.  "I  want  him  to 
do  whatever  he  chooses,  and 
I'm  looking  forward  to  sitting 
down  with  him  to  see  what  he 
wants  to  do.  This  may  not  be 
the  appropriate  time  to  make 
decisions  about  your  career." 

It  was  a  comment  reminis- 
cent of  last  May,  when  Barkley 
moped  around  for  a  month 
after  the  Rockets  eliminated 
the  Suns  4-3  in  another  sec- 
ond-round series.  Teammate 
Danny  Ainge  eventually  talked 
Barkley  into  coming  back  for 
at  least  one  more  season. 

Barkley  had  collapsed  in 
training  camp  in  October  1993, 
and  doctors  diagnosed  a 
bulging  disk  in  his  spine.  He 
played  in  pain  most  of  the 
1993-94  season,  getting  into  a 
career- low  65  games  and  aver- 
aging 21.6  points  per  game, 
the  lowest  since  his  second 
season. 

This  season,  Barkley 
appeared  to  benefit  from  a  con- 
ditioning  and  strengthening 
program,  finishing  seventh  in 
scoring  (23.0)  after  playing  in 
68  games.  His  average  of  1 1.1 
rebounds  would  have  ranked 
him  fourth,  but  he  didn't  have 
the  league  minimums  of  70 
games  or  700  rebounds. 


Baseball  shells  UNLV  pitchers 
in  sweep;  finishes  above  .500 


By  Ross  Bersot 

You  might  call  it  going  out  in 
style. 

UCLA  baseball  (29-28)  swept 
UNLV  this  weekend  at  Earl  E. 
Wilson  Stadium  to  avoid  closing 
out  the  season  below  .500  for  the 
second  consecutive  year.  Bruin 
bats  burned  brighter  than  even  Las 
Vegas'  notorious  neon  in  rocking 
the  Hustlin'  Rebels'  (32-24)^heIp 


less  pitching  staff  for  41  runs  in 
the  series. 

Having  taken  the  first  two 
games  of  the  series,  Sunday's  out- 
come would  prove  the  difference 
between  a  winning  and  losing  sea- 
son for  UCLA.  Down  4-3  going 
into  the  .seventh,  the  Bruins  scored 
four  runs  in  the  top  of  the  eighth 
and  never  looked  back,  winning 
10-7. 

Leading  the  offensive  charge 
for  the  visitors  was  Troy  Glaus, 
who  went  two  for  four  with  two 
home  runs  and  five  RBI.  Catcher 
Tim  DeCinces  drove  in  two  runs 
on  his  team-best  13th  dinger  and 
Pete  Zamora  also  had  a  homer  and 
two  RBI. 

Zamora  got  the  starting  nod  and 
made  the  best  of  it,  allowing  one 
run  on  three  hits  and  striking  out 
three  in  five  innings  of  work.  In 
his  last  game  as  a  Bruin,  Bobby 
Kazmirski  took  the  mound  for 
three  innings.  The  fifth-year 
senior  gave  up  three  hits  and  three 
runs,  none  of  which  were  earned, 
in  picking  up  his  fifth  save  of  the 
season. 

Michael  Caravelli,  also  playing 


UCLA  Sport*  Into 


UCLA  Sports  Info 


Gar  Vallone 


Brett  NIsta 


his  final  game  in  a  UCLA  uniform 
retired  one  batter  in  the  sixth 
inning  and  got  the  win  for  his 
effort. 
V  UNLV  never  posed  a  threat  in 
Friday's  opener,  as  the  Bruins 
started  the  .scoring  early  and  pro- 
ceeded to  win  12-7.  DeCinces, 
who  also  homered,  and  third  base- 
man Zak  Ammirato  each  drove  in 
three  runs,  while  Glaus  went  four 
for  five  with  two  RBI  and  a 
roundtripper. 

Gar  Vallone  went  three  for  six 
as  designated  hitter  before  moving 
back  to  shortstop  for  the  final  two 
games  of  his  collegiate  career. 

Rick  Heineman  tabbed  his  sev- 
enth win  of  the  season  in  six 
innings  of  work.  A  workhorse  all 
year  long,  the  righly  earned  two 
runs  on  five  hits  in  six  innings, 
while  striking  out  four.  Ryan 


O'Toole  shut  out  the  Rebels  for 
the  final  two-and-a-third  innings 
en  route  to  his  second  save. 

Freshman  Brett  Nista  returned 
to  the  starting  lineup  for  Friday's 
game  and  got  two  hits  in  five  trips 
to  the  plate. 

Nista's  four-for-six,  two  home 
run,  nine-RBI  demolition  of 
UNLV  pitchers  personally  won 
Saturday's  contest  for  the  Bruins. 
A  tight  4-3  Bruin  lead  was  blown 
open  by  a  lO-run  fourth  inning, 
after  which  UCLA  cruised  to  a  19- 
10  victory. 

Vallone  went  two  for  three  with 
a  dinger  and  three  RBI  to  close  out 
his  career.  UNLV  managed  10 
runs,  eight  off  UCLA  starter  Ryan 
Lynch,  five  of  which  were  earned. 
Lynch  hurled  six  innings,  allowed 
eight  hits  and  struck  out  three  to 
pick  up  the  win. 


(310)  209-1422 

FREE  DELIVERY 

•TIL  3  A.M. 


) 


NCAA  Women's  Divl»!cn  I  Tennis 


SINGLES 
Champlonihip 

Ken  Phebus.  UCLA  def  Kelly  Pace. 
Texas.  6-2, 6-3 


.SIM  MM  S   \H>\ 


spours  i{(»x 


SIMJIMS   li()\ 


1136 
Westwood  BLVD 


DOUBLES 
Cliampionthlp. 

Ken  Phebus  and  Susie  Starrett.  UCLA, 
det  Christina  Moros  and  Kelty  Pace, 
Texas,  6-3, 6-3 


National  Basketball  Association 
Playoffs  at  a  Olance 


CONFERENCE  SEMIFINALS     _ 
Thursday,  May  18 

Orlando  108  Chicago  102 

Orlando  wins  series  4-2 
Houston  116.  Phoenix  103 
San  Antonio  100.  LA  Lakers  88 

San  Antonio  wins  series  4-2 
Friday.  May  19 
New  fork  92  Indiana  82 
Saturday.  May  20 
Houston  115.  Phoenix  114 

Houston  wins  series  4-3 
Sunday.  May  21 
Indiana  97.  New  York  95 

Indiana  wins  series  4  3 


CONFERENCE  FINALS 

Monday,  May  22 

Houston  at  San  Antonio,  5;30  p  m 

(TNT) 

Tuatday,  May  23 

Indiana  at  Orlando.  5  p.m  (TNT) 

Wadnttday,  May  24 

Houston  at  San  Antonio,  5  30  pm 

(TNT) 

Thureday,  May  25 

Indiana  at  Orlando,  5  p  rq  (TNT) 
FrMay,  May  28 

San  Antonio  at  Houston,  5  p  m  (TNT) 

Saturday,  May  27 

Orlando  at  Indiana,  12  30  p  m  (NBC) 

Sanday,  May  28 

San  Antonio  at  Houston,  12:30  p  m. 

(NBC) 

Monday,  May  29 

Orlando  at  Indiana.  12.30  p  m.  (NBC) 

Taatday,  May  30 

Houston  at  San  Antonio.  6  p  m.  (NBC). 

UnecKury 

Indlaru  at  Ortando,  6  p  m  (NBC),  it 
necessary 


Thursday.  June  1 

San  Antonio  at  Houston.  6  p  m  (NBC). 

//  necessary 

Friday.  Jun«  2 

Orlando  at  Indiana,  6  p  m  (NBC).  // 

necessary 

Saturday.  Juna  3 

Houston  at  San  Antonio,  12.30  p  m 

(NBC),  if  necessary 

Sunday,  Junt  4 

Indiana  at  Orlando,  4  p.m  (NBC),  i/ 

necessary 

All  Times  PST 


Indiana-N.Y,  Knicks  Box  Score 


INDIANA  (97) 

D  Davis  /  10  0-0  14,  McKey  6-13  0-0 

14,  Smits  9-17  1-2  19,  Jackson  3-9  4- 
4  10,  Miller  10-18  6-9  29,  Workman  1- 
4  0-0  2.  A  Davis  1-4  3-4  5,  Mitchell  0-3 
2-2  2.  Scon  1-2  0-0  2  Totals  38-80 

16  21  97     f 

NEW  YORK  (95) 

Oakley  1-5  7-'lO  9.  Smith  5-9  2-2  12, 

Ewino  12-23  5-9  29,  Harper  6-10  0-0 

15.  Starks  6-11  5-6  19.  Mason  1-2  1-4 
3.  Bonner  1  -2  0-0  2,  H  Davis  1  -4  0-0  3, 
Anthony  1-2  G-0  3  Totals  34-68  20-31 
95 

Indiana  34  22  25  16  -  97 

NevirYork  28  24  24  19  -  95 

3-Point  goals— Indiana  5-11  (Ml)ler  3- 
5,  McKcy  2-3,  Workman  0-1,  Jackson 
0-2),  Newr  York  7-13  (Harper  3-4, 
Starks  2-5.  Anthony  1  -1 ,  H  Davis  12, 
Bonner  0-1)  Fouled  out— None 
Rebounds— Indiana  39  (Jackson  8), 

New  York  53  (Ewing  14)  Assists— 
Indiana  26  (Jackson  8),  New  York  25 
(Oakley,  Harper  6)  Total  louls— 
Indiana  29.  New  York  23  Technicals- 
New  York  illegal  defense.  Flagrant 
fouls— Harper  A— 19,763  (19,763) 


Houston-Phoenix  Box  Score 


HOUSTON  (115) 

Chilcutt  4-5  3-4  12.  Horry  2-4  0-0  5, 
Olaiuwon  10-21  9-17  29,  Drexler  11-19 
6-7  29,  Smith  3-8  3-4  10,  Catselt  6-10 
5-5  18,  Brown  1-2  2-2  4,  Elie  2-5  3-3 
8  Totals  39-74  31-42  115. 

PHOENIX  (114) 

Barkley  7-16  4-5  18,  Green  3-4  2-4  8, 


Kleine  2-2  0-0  4.  Johnson  12-26  21-22 
46.  Person  1-6  0-0  3,  Schayes  1-10-0 

2.  Maierle  1-7  4-4  6,  Tisdale  1-2  1-2  3, 
Perry  2-4  1-2  5,  Ainge  5-8  5-5- 

19  Totals  35-7638-44  114 

Houston  13  28  40  34  -115 

Phoenix  26  25  28  35  -114 

3-Point  goals— Houston  6-17  (Chilcuti 
1-2,  Horry  1-2,  Drexler  1-3,  Cassell  1- 

3.  Ehe  1  -3,  Smith  1  -4).  Phoenix  6-20 
(Ainge  4-6,  Johnson  1-2,  Person  1-4. 
PerVy  0-1 .  Green  0-1 ,  Barkley  0-2, 
Maierle  0-4)  Fouled  out— Cassell 
Rebounds— Houston  39  (Ola)uwon 
11).  Phoenix  54  (Barkley  23) 
Assists— Houston  23  (Cassell  7), 
Phoenix  18  (Johnson  10)  Total 
fouls— Houston  35.  Phoenix  33 
Technical — Houston  Illegal  defense 
A— 19,023(19,023) 


NHL  Plawoffs 
at  a  Glance 


CONFERENCE  8EMIFIMALS 

Saturday.  May  20 

Pittsburgh  3,  New  Jersey  2,  Pittsburgh 

leads  series  1  -0 

Sunday.  May  21 

Detroit  6,  San  Jose  0,  Detroit  leads 

series  1  -0 

Philadelphia  5,  New  York  4.  OT, 

Philadelphia  leads  series  1-0 

Vancouver  at  Chicago  (n)  (ESPN2) 

MMday,M«v22 

NY  Rangers  at  Philadelphia,  7:30  p  m 

(ESPN) 

New  Jersey  at  Pittsburgh,  7:30  p  m 

(ESPN2) 

Tuesday,  May  23 

San  Jose  at  Detroit,  7:30  p.m  (ESPN) 

Vancouver  at  Chicago,  7:30  p  m 

(FSPN2) 

Wednesday,  May  24 

Philadelphia  at  NY  Rangers.  7:30  p.m. 

(ESPN2) 

Pittsburgh  at  New  Jersey,  7:30  p  m 

Thursday,  May  25 

Chicago  at  Vancouver,  10  pm 

Detroit  at  San  Jose,  10  30  p  m 

Friday.  May  28 

Philadelphia  at  NY  Rangers.  7:30  p  m. 

Pittsburgh  at  New  Jersey,  7:30  p  m 

Satart«v.May27 

Chicago  at  Vancouver,  3  p.m. 

Detroit  at  San  Jose,  7:30  p  m 

SMiday.lllliv28 

Vancouver  at  Chicago.  3  p.m  (FOX),  If 


necessary 

NY  Rangers  at  Philadelphia,  TBA,  if 
necessary 

New  Jersey  at  Pittsburgh,  TBA,  // 
necessary 
Monday,  May  29 
San  Jose  at  Detroit,  7:30  p  m  ,  // 
necessary 
Tuesday,  May  30 
Philadelphia  at  NY  Rangers.  7:30 
pm ,  if  necessary 

Pitlsburgh  at  New  Jersey,  7:30  p.m  ,  i 
necessary 

Chicago  at  Vancouver,  10:30  p  m  .  if 
necessary 

Detroit-et  San  Jftee,  10  30  p  m.,  H 
necessary 
Thursday,  June  1 

^KY  Rangers  at  Philadelphia,  7:30 
pm ,  if  necessary 

New  Jersey  at  Pittsburgh,  7:30  p  m  , 
necessary 

San  Jose  at  Detroit,  7:30  p.m..  If 
necessary 

Vancouver  at  Chicago,  8:30  p.m.,  // 
necessary 


American  League 
at  a  Glance 


Eastern  Dhrlsion 


Boston 
New  York 
Detroit 
Toronto 
BaNimore 


W 
14 
12 
10 
10 
9 


Central  Dhrlsion 


Cleveland 
Milwaukee 
Kansas  City 
Chicago 
Minnesota 

WNt  Dhrlsion 

California 
Seattle 
Oakland 
Texas 


W 

15 

11 

9 

8 

8 


W 
15 
12 
13 
13 


L 

8 

9 

13 

13 

13 


L 
6 
12 
13 
14 
16 


L 

9 

10 

11 

12 


Pet. 
636 
571 
435 
.435 
.409 


GB 

1  1/2 
4  1/2 
41/2 
5 


Pel  GB 

714  — 

478 

409 

364 

333 


5 

61/2 
71/2 
81/2 


Pel.  GB 
625  - 
545  2 
542  2 
5202  1/2 


Texas  7,  Milwaukee  6, 11  innings 

Sunday's  Games 

Detroit  2.  Toronto  1 

New  York  5.  Baltimore  0 

Seattle  5,  Minnesota  2 

Cleveland  12,  Boston  10 

California  8,  Chicago  6 

Oakland  7,  Kansas  City  2 

Texas  6,  Milwaukee  0 

Monday's  Games 

Seattle  (Wells  1-2)  at  Detroit  (Groom 

1-1),  115pm 

Kansas  City  (Appier  4-1)  at  Toronto 

(Darwin  1-2).  1:35  p.m. 

Milwaukee  (Bones  2-1)  at  Cleveland 

(Nagy  2-0),  7:05  p  m. 


National  League 
at  a  Glance 


East  Division 

Philadelphia 

Atlanta 

Montreal 

NewYor1( 

Florida 


W  L 

17  6 

14  10 

12  12 

10  14 

5  18 


Central  Dhrlsion 

Chicago 
Houston 
Cincinnati 
St.  Louis 
Pittsburgh 

Wott  Dhrlsion 

Colorado 
San  Francisco 
San  Diego 
Los  Angeles 


W 
15 
13 
11 
11 
8 


W 
14 
13 
11 
10 


L 
7 

10 
11 
14 
14 


L 

10 
12 
12 
14 


Pet.   G6 
.739   — 
.583   31/2 
.500   51/2 
.417   7  1/2 
.217    12 


Pet.  GB 
682  - 
565   21/2 
500    4 
.440   51/2 
364    7 


Pet. 
.583 
.520 
.478 
.417 


GB 

11/2 
21/2 
4 


Saturday's  Bamoa 

Cleveland  7,  Boston  5 
Detroit  10,  Toronto  6 
New  York  7.  Baltimore  2 
California  7,  Chtcago  5, 10  Innings 
Oakland  11.  Kansas  City  1 
Seattle  10,  Minnesota  8 


Saturday's  Qamat 

San  Francisco  10,  St  Louis  7 

Philadelphia  10.  New  York  8 

Cincinnati  10,  Colorado  9. 10  innings 

Atlanta  8.  Florida  7 

Houston  2,  Montreal  1. 10  Innings 

Chicago  7,  Los  Angeles  1 

San  Diego  9,  Pittsburgh  6 

Sunday's  Games 

Late  Game  Not  Included 

Atlanta  5,  Florida  1 

Philadelphia  5.  New  York  3 

Colorado  5,  CincintMti  2 

Houston  5,  Montreal  2 

St.  Louis  9,  San  Francisco  7 

Chicago  2,  Los  Angeles  1,13  Innings 

Pittsburgh  at  San  Olego  (n) 


Monday's  Games 

Florida  (Weathers  1-0)  at  Montreal 

(Perez  2-0).  7:35  p  m. 

Houston  (Drabek  1-3)  at  Cincinnati 

(Rijo  2-2),  7:35  p  m 

Chicago  (Navarro  4-0)  at  Colorado 

(Switt  1-0),  9:05  pm 


Weekend  Sports  Transactions 


BASEBAU 

American  League 

KANSAS  CITY  ROYALS— Activated  Phil 
Hiatt.  outfielder,  from  the  15-day  dis- 
abled list  Optioned  Chris  Stynes,  sec- 
ond baseman,  to  Omaha  of  the 
American  Association  Placed  Tom 
Browning,  pitcher,  on  the  15-day  dis- 
abled list  Recalled  Tim  Pittsley,  pitch- 
er, from  Omaha. 

MILWAUKEE  BREWERS— Placed 
Michael  Ignasiak,  pitcher,  on  the  15- 
day  disabled  list,  retroactive  to  May  15 
Recalled  Sid  Roberson.  pitcher,  from 
New  Orleans  of  the  American 
Association. 

NEW  YORK  YANKEES— Placed  Jimmy 
Key,  pitcher,  on  the  15-day  disabled 
list,  retroactive  to  May  17 
SEAHLE  MARINERS— Acquired 
Salomon  Torres,  pitcher,  from  the  San 
Francisco  Giants  tor  Shawn  Estes, 
pitcher,  and  Wilson  Delgado,  infielder. ,. 
Acquired  Steve  Frey,  pitcher,  from  San 
Francisco  for  future  considerations 
Designated  Lee  Guetterman,  pitcher, 
for  assignment. 

TORONTO  BLUE  JAYS— Placed  Juan 
Guzman,  pitcher,  on  the  15-day  dis- 
abled list.  Recalled  Edwin  Hurtado, 
pitcher,  from  Knoxville  of  the  Southern 
League 

National  League 

LOS  ANGELES  DODGERS— Activated 
Tim  Wallach.  third  baseman,  from  the 
15-day  disabled  list  Optioned  Eddie    ■ 
Pye,  infielder,  to  Albuquerque  of  the 
Pacific  Coast  League. 
PinSBURGH  PIRATES— Placed  Jacob 
Brumfeld,  outfielder,  on  the  15-day  dis- 
abled list,  retroactive  to  May  19. 
Recalled  John  Wehner,  third  baseman, 
from  Erie  of  the  New  York-Penn 
League. 

SAN  FRANCISCO  GIANTS-Purchased 
the  contract  of  Shawn  Barton,  pitcher, 
from  Phoenix  of  the  Pacific  Coast 
League. 

CemplM  from  Bruin  Win  t§nltm 


■^ 


Daily  Bruin  Sports 


Monday,  May  22, 1995    31 


Janecek,  Lin  bow  out  of  NCAAs 


^  Janecek  falls  in  singles, 
loses  doubles  to  USC  in 
second  round  with  Lin 


By  Sarah  Harrison 

Robert  Janecek  and  Eric  Lin  finally  fol- 
lowed the  rest  of  the  UCLA  men's  tennis 
team  back  to  Westwood,  leaving  Athens, 
Ga.,  and  their  1995  season  behind  them. 
Their  departure  came  after  two  disap- 
pointing losses  in  the  NCAA  tournament. 

In  the  singles,  Janecek  lost  to  Fresno 
State's  Fredrik  Bergh  6-1,6-3,  in  the  third 
round.  This  is  the  second  loss  to  Bergh 
that  Janecek  has  had  in  these  champi- 
onships -  the  first  loss  was  in  the  first 
round  of  the  NCAA  team  tournament. 

The  loss  to  Bergh  came  after  Janecek 


convincingly  upset  No.  5  seed  Paul 
Robinson  from  Texas  Christian  University 
on  Thursday  in  the  second  round. 

"As  well  as  Janecek  played  on 
Thursday,  he  played  equally  bad  on 
Friday,"  UCLA  head  coach  Billy  Martin 
said.  "I  don't  know  what  was  wrong  with 
him,  I  haven't  been  able  to  put  my  finger 
on  it  all  season." 

Janecek's  vacillating  play  has  been  his 
problem  all  season,  and  it  did  not  end  with 
his  singles  play.  The  Bruin  tandem  of 
Janecek  and  Lin  was  handed  a  loss  by 
use's  Brett,  Hansen  ^nd  Fernando 
Samayoa  in  the  second  round  of  doubles. 

UCLA  put  up  a  fight,  taking  the  match 
to  three  sets.  The  Bruins  won  the  first  set 
3-6,  lost  the  second  6-3,  and  were  up  4-2 
with  a. break  in  the  third.  However,  the  tra- 
ditional Trojan  rivals  came  back  and  took 
the  match  to  a  tiebreaker.  Hansen  and 
Samayoa  won  the  tiebreaking  game,  7-3, 


to  go  on  to  the  third  round. 

"(Janecek  and  Lin)  started  off  very 
well."  Martin  said.  "Then  Robert's  play 
started  to  get  worse  and  worse.  Eric 


"As  well  as  janecek  played  on 

Thursday,  he  played  equally 

bad  on  Friday  ...  I  don't  know 

what  was  wrong  with  him,  I 

haven't  been  able  to  put  my 

finger  on  iralfisea 

Billy  Martin 

UCLA  Head  Coach 


played  very  well  throughout  the  match, 
but  Robert  was  missing  so  many  balls  at 
the  net  that  they  couldn't  pull  off  a  win." 


Robert  Janecelt  lost  to 
Fredrik  Bergh  6-1.  6-3. 


scon  O/Daily  Bruin 

Fresno  State's 


Disappointing  Regional  ends  season  for  men's  golf 


Bruins'  ITth-place  finish  won't  advance 
the  team  tQ.NCAA  Championships 


By  Hye  Kwon 

Daily  Bruin  Staff 

A  season  which  started  with  a  lot 
of  promise  came  to  a  disappointing 
conclusion  for  the  UCLA  men's 
golf  team  on  Saturday  afternoon,  as 
the  Bruins  finished  17th  at  the 
NCAA  Western  Regionals,  failing 
to  qualify  for  the  Finals. 

Going  into  the  weekend,  the 
Bruins  saw  the  Championship  Golf 
Course  at  Albuquerque,  N.  M.,  as  a 


proving  ground  where  they  could 
achieve  some  sweet  redemption. 
The  three-day  toumament  was  sup- 
posed to  be  the  place  where  the 
promise  that  the  Bruins  showed 
early  in  the  season  finally  translated 
into  reality. 

But  as  it  turned  out,  the  Western 
Regional  was  just  another  disap- 
pointing golf  toumament  that  finally 
ended  a  long  season  for  UCLA. 

"It  was  a  team  effort  in  that  every- 
one played  poorly,"  head  coach 


Dave  Atchison  said.  "It's  been  a 
frustrating  second  half  of  the  sea- 
son." > 

Despite  the  fact  that  the  Bruins 
were  struggling  of  late,  they  still  had 
the  chance  to  make  it  to  the  NCAA 
Finals  if  they  could  have  somehow 
finished  in  the  top  nine.  But  not  only 
did  the  Bruins  fail  to  qualify  as  one 
of  the  top-nine  finishers,  they  were 
only  one  place  away  from  the  cellar. 

UCLA  accumulated  a  three-day 
score  of  293-306-301 ,  which  put  the 
Bruins  54  shots  behind  toumament 
winner  Arizona  State  and  12  in  front 
of  last  place  San  Diego  State. 

After  the  first  day  of  competition 
on  Thursday,  there  was  a  glimmer 


of  hope  for  the  Bruins.  Thanks  to 
Brian  Bock,  who  finished  the  first 
day  with  a  score  of  70,  UCLA  was 
sitting  in  ninth  place  with  a  score  of 
293. 

But  it  was  all  downhill  from 
there. 

On  Friday,  the  Bruins  shot  a  mis- 
erable 306,  which  dropped  the  team 
to  17th  place.  Barring  a  miracle  on 
the  course  on  Saturday,  the  Bruins' 
hope  of  reaching  the  Finals  had  all 
but  vani.shed.  UCLA's  score  of  301 
on  the  third  day  was  a  little  better 
than  their  score  on  Friday,  but  it  fell 
far  short  of  the  miraculous  score 
needed. 

The  top  finisher  for  the  Bniips  for 


two  sU-aight  toumaments  was  B(x;k. 
The  senior  from  Lincoln,  Neb.,  tal- 
lied a  score  of  222,  which  was  14 
.shots  behind  winner  Mik.c  Saucr  of 
New  Mexico.  Bock  was  followed 
by  Kevin  Rhoads  at  226.  Trevor 
Arts  and  Mike  Miller  at  228  and 
Kric  Lohman  at  229. 

Of  the  nine  teams  that  qualified 
for  the  NCAA  Finals,  five  teams 
came  from  the  Pac-IO  conference. 
They  are  Arizona  State,  Arizona, 
Stanford.  Califomia  and  USC.  The 
remaining  Western  Region  teams 
that  qualified  for  the  Championship 
toumament  are  New  Mexico.  New 
Mexico  State,  Nevada  Las  Vegas 
and  Texas  El  Paso. 


V 


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•  Crumb  Coffee  Cake 

•  Pecan  Coffee  Cake 

•  Coconut  Layer  Cake 

•  German  Chocolate  Cake 

•  Chocolate  Fudge  Layer  Cake 

•  Raspberry  Turnovers 

•  Blueberry  Turnovers 


•  Banana  Cream  Pie 

•  Chocolate  Cream  pie 

•  Apple  Pie 

•  Pecan  pie 

•  Oregon  Farms  Carrot  Cake 


any  dessert  item 
listed  with  this 

coupon    _____^ 
-  .Expires  5/28/95  l^ms^l 


Open  'til 


Midnight 


1111 


32     Monday,  May  22, 1995 


Daily  Bruin  Sports 


Sports 


Phebus  bags  a  pair  of  NCAA  tennis  titles 

Junior  netter  defeats  top-seeded  foe  for  singles 
crown,  then  pairs  with  Starrett  for  doubles  win 


By  Chds  HMro — — 

MALIBU  —  No  player  on  the  UCLA 
women's  tennis  team  was  more  distraught  than 
Keri  Phebus  after  the  Bruin  loss  to  Stanford 
last  Sunday  in  the  NCAA  championships  at 
Pepperdine.  "^ 

"1  had  ail  my  hopes  on  leading  the  team  to 
the  title,"  Phebus  said.  "1  put  so  much  energy 
in  it  and  after  we  lost,  I  told  the  coaches  I  just 
didn't  want  to  play  (in  the  individual  champi- 
onships) " 

Phebus  put  aside  her  disappointment  and 
finished  the  season  atop  the  college  tennis 
world,  sweeping  the  NCAA  singles  and  dou- 
bles titles  on  Sunday  at  the  Ralphs-Straus 
Tennis  Stadium. 

Second-ranked  Phebus  stunned  lop-seeded 
Kelly  Pace  of  Texas  6-2, 6-3,  then  teamed  with 
Susie  Starrett  to  defeat  Pace  and  Cristina 
Moros  6-3, 6-3. 

"I  realized  that  I  just  had  to  move  on," 
Phebus  said.  "I  didn't  think  that  I  would  get 
from  such  a  valley  to  the  highest  mountain." 

Phebus  staggered  into  her  high  noon  show- 
down with  Pace  after  playing  until  8  p.m.  the 


night -before.  TJielwo^  combatants  met  in 


October  just  10  miles  down  the  road  at  the  All 
American  Championships  in  Pacific  Palisades. 
Pace  took  their  only  meeting,  sweeping  then 
fifth-ranked  Phebus  .6-2, 6- 1 . 

The  slice  backhand  is  Pace's  favored 
weapon.  In  their  last  meeting,  the  Longhom 
used  it  to  approach  the  net 
and  keep  the  hard-hitting 
Phebus  off-balance. 

"Pace  doesn't  create 
much  offense  on  her 
own,"  UCLA  head  coach 
Bill  Zaima  said.  "But  .she 
doesn't  make  mistakes 
and  her  slice  induces 
errors." 

Phebus  looked  to  stay 
away  from  the  backhand 
and  pound  Pace  on  the  forehand  side. 

"Playing  Kelly  is  like  playing  chess," 
Phebus  said.  "I  was  hoping  to  attack  her  fore- 
hand before  she  attacked  my  backhand." 
The  match  was  a  stalemate  early  as  both 

See  W.  TENNIS,  page  28 


n  n  I J  toN   I   «  o  M  t  \   li 


Softball  wins  Regional; 
headed  for  World  Series 


By  Melissa  Anderson 

Daily  Bruin  Senior  Staff 

While  the  UCLA\softball  team  was  in 
Columbia,  S.C,  making  its  way  back  to  the 
College  World  Series  this  weekend,  senior 
Jennifer  Brundage  was  once  again  making 
her  way  into  the  record  books. 

In  the  NCAA  Southern  Regional  opener 
against  Campbell  University  Friday, 
Brundage  led  the  Bruins  to  a  five-inning,  8-0 
victory  with  her  three-for-three  performance, 
including  a  home  run  and  three  RBIs.  The 
home  run,  her  14th  of  the  season  and  20th  of 


her  career,  puts  Brundage  alone  atop  the 
record  books  in  both  categories.  The  three 
RBIs  make  her  the  single-sea.son  and  career 
leader,  breaking  the  previous  records  held  by 
Yvonne  Gutierrez. 

Junior  pitcher  Kaci  Clark,  who  suffered  a 
knee  injury  while  pitching  for  Georgia  Slate 
in  the  final  game  of  last  year's  regional  at 
Columbia,  took  the  mound  for  UCLA  on 
Friday.  Clark,  who  has  not  seen  much  action 
since  the  arrival  of  Austral ia-tran.sfer  Tanya 
Harding,  held  the  Lady  Camels  to  just  one 

See  SOFTBALL,  page  27 


fHtUHE 


Driving  a  backhand  over  the  net,  Karl  Phebus  secures  her  6-2,  6-3  victory  over 
No.  1  Kelly  Pace.  Phebus*  win  earned  her  the  1995  NCAA  singles  championship. 


Inside  Sports 

Checking  out 

*. 

Robert  Janecek's  improb- 
able run  at  an  NCAA  sin- 
gles championship  ended 
Friday.  With  Janecek  oust- 
ed, the  men's  tennis  team's 
season  is  officially  over. 

Checking 
out,  part  two 

9 

The  men's  golf  team  fin- 
ished the  NCAA  Western 
Regional  in  a  disappointing 
17th  place,  eliminating 
UCLA  from  the  list  of 
teams  invited  to  the  NCAA 
Tournament. 

See  Page  31 

Leaving  Las 
Vegas ... 

The  UCLA  ba.seball  team 
played  a  three  game  series 
at  UNLV  over  the  weekend, 
bringing  the  Bruins'  season 
to  a  clo.se.  Did  they  leave 
Vegas  as  wiiiners  or  losers? 

^               See  Page  30 

Records  fall  as  track  sweeps  Pac-lOs 


Men  win  fourth 
straight  crown; 
Godina,  Boldon^ 
are  double-winners 

By  Tim  Costner 

Daily  Bruin  Senior  Staff 

For  the  UCLA  men's  track  and 
field  team,  winning  the  Pac-10 
Championships  might  have  been 
more  meaningful  if  the  Bmins  did- 
n't have  loftier  goals  in  mind. 

But  with  the  NCAAs  looming 
ahead  at  the  end  of  the  month  - 
and  with  UCLA  leading  the  nation 
in  four  events  -  this  weekend's 
Pac-IOs  in  Tucson  were  really 
more  of  a  preparation  for  a  national 
title. 

Besides,  UCLA  has  owned  the 
conference  meet  for  the  last  four 
years. 

"I  think  we  gelled,  as  usual  -  as 
Bruins,"  said  UCLA  sprinting 
coach  John  Smith.  "Our  team  is 
even  better  than  you  see  on  paper. 
We've  had  teams  with  better  talent 
overall,  but  I  think  this  team  has  the  srEVEKiM/ortyBfum 

— >     Valeyta  AKhouM  successfully  defended  her  Pac-10  shot  put 

See  M.  TRACK,  page  29     title  last  weekend  with  a  collegiate  record  throw  of  61-10  1/4. 


Women  capture 
third  straight  title; 
Acuff,  Althouse  set 
collegiate  marks 


By  Scott  YamaguchI 

Daily  Bruin  Senior  Staff 

When  the  coaches  of  the  UCLA 
women's  track  and  field  team 
doped  the  1995  Pac-10 
Championship  meet  on  paper,  they 
found  their  team  losing  to  the 
University  of  Oregon  by  six  points. 

And  Friday  night,  after  the  first 
day  of  competition  at  the  Roy  P. 
Drachman  Stadium  in  Tucson, 
Ariz.,  their  prediction  seemed  to  be 
holding  true.  UCLA,  which  had 
won  the  last  two  conference  titles, 
stood  in  second  place  with  48 
points  -  five  points  behind  Oregon. 

But  on  Saturday,  the  final  day  of 
competition,  a  resurgent  Bruin 
squad  scored  101  additional  points 
to  run  away  with  its  third  consecu- 
tive, and  seventh  overall,  Pac-10 
title.  Oregon  wound  up  in  second 
place  with  123  points,  while 

See  W.  TRACK,  page  29 


University  of  California,  Los  Angeles 


84th Year,  No.  127 
Circulation:  20,000 


Daily  Bnin 


Tuesday 
May  23, 1995 


Reno  speaks  at  UCLA  law  graduation 


By  Laryssa  Kreiselmeyer 

U.S.  Attorney  General  Janet 
Reno  spoke  before  a  packed  crowd 
of  3,000  people  at  UCLA's  law 
school  commencement  ceremony 
Sunday,  encouraging  the  294  grad- 
uates to  work  toward  helping 
America's  youths. 

In  her  speech  at  the  Dickson 
Plaza  event,  Reno  told  the  audience 
of  her  goal  to  improve  the  condition 
of  American  children,  whom  she 
called  the  most  "underrepresented 
and  voiceless"  population. 

"We  have  got  to  make  the  law 
real  for  all  Americans  once  again 
and  (give  children)  a  chance  to 
grow  in  a  sU-ong,  positive  way.  The 
destiny  of  our  children  is  our  des- 
tiny," said  Reno,  the  first  woman  to 
hold  the  attorney  general  post. 

During  her  work  in  the  Florida 
Stale  Attorney's  Office,  Reno  orga- 
nized a  juvenile  division,  helped 
reform  the  juvenile  justice  system 
and  sought  child  support  payments 
from  deadbeat  dads. 

She  said  that  in  her  work  with 
juveniles,  developmental  psycholo- 
gists told  her  that  the  formative 
years  until  age  5  are  when  punish- 
mrent  is  understood  and  a  con- 
science developed. 

She  urged  the  1995  graduating 
lawyers  to  support  intervention  pro- 
grams in  the  future  in  order  to 
invest  in  this  group  of  young  peo- 
ple, citing  statistics  that  one  in  five 
crimes  is  committed  by  a  juvenile 
and  that  seven  children  are  mur- 
dered a  day  in  the  United  States. 

"We  have  forgotten  how  to 
invest  in  our  people.  Lawyers  don't 
like  to  support  child  aid  ca.ses  (but) 
lawyering  is  representing  people 
who  need  services."  Reno  said. 


GREGERS  REIMANN 

U.S.  Attorney  General  Janet  Reno  holds  up  her  gift  while  speaking  at  the  UCLA  Law  School  gradua- 
tion on  Sunday. 


The  class  of  1995  comprised  the 
second  largest  group  of  applicants 
that  the  law  school  had  ever  seen 
when  they  entered  the  school  three 
years  ago,  said  Dean  Susan  Prager. 

Many  of  these  lawyers  could 
help  by  supporting  family  prcserva- 


- — Y_ 

tionwork,  minimizing  the  impact  what  you  do  for  others  ...  (there  is) 
of  divorces  on  the  children  and  a  firm  foundation  in  the  law  - 
being  aware  that  there  is  more  to  human  beings,"  Reno  said,  who 
the  law  than  paper,  Reno  said.  called  the  UCLA  class  a  "remark- 
"Draw  strength  from  friends  sit-  able  student  body"  and  an  "exam- 
ling  here*  change  the  world  for  who     

you  are,  what  you  stand  for,  and  See  RENO,  page  6 


investigate 
gunshot 


A  gunshot  heard  Sunday 
around  the  UCLA  Medical 
Center  originated  in  the 
School  of  Dentistry  that 
afternoon,  police  officials 
said. 

At  af)proximalely  2:30 
p.m.,  UCLA  Emergency 
Medical  Services  and  uni- 
versity police  were  dis- 
patched to  a  report  of  "shots 
fired  with  a  victim  down" 
on  the  Dentistry  Building's 
third  tloor. 

There,  medics  discovered 
a  66-year-old  female  uncon- 
.scious  with  an  apparent  gun- 
shot wound  to  the  head.  She 
immediately  received  resus- 
citative  measures  and  was 
transported  to  the  UCLA 
Emergency  Room  for  addi- 
tional care,  where  she  later 
died  that  day. 

The  woman's  identifica- 
tion was  unavailable  at  press 
time.  The  circumstances 
surrounding  her  death  are 
still  under  investigation  by* 
the  UCLA  Police* 
Department  and  the  Los 
Angeles  Coroner's  Office. 

Currently,  officials  are 
looking  into  whether  the 
death  was  a  suicide  or  mur- 
der, said  Ben  Rael-Brook, 
UCLA  Emergency  Medical 
Services  supervisor. 

From  Bruin  stuff  reports. 


Inside  News 


Booze  binge 

College  students  are 
doing  fewer  drugs,  smoking 
less  and  overeating  less  than 
other  young  adults.  They're 
even  drinking  less,  on  the 
whole.  But  studies  find  per- 
sistent heavy  binge  drinking 
on  campuses  nationwide. 

See  page  3 


inside  A&E 


The  Daves 
I  know 

Former  Kid  in  the  Hall 
David  Foley  plays  David 
Nelson  on  "Newsradio." 
Does  he  feel  the  constraints 
of  prime  time?  Sorta  -just 
don't  ask  him  to  say  the  "C" 
word  ... 

See  page  16 


USAC  to  vote  on  IFC  responsorship  issue 


By  Rashml  Nijagal 

Daily  Bruin  Staff 

The  undergraduate  student 
council  will  vote  on  a  motion  to 
sponsor  the  Interfratemity  Council 
(IFC)  at  tonight's  meeting,  sched- 
uled to  begin  at  4:30  p.m.  in 
Kerckhoff  Hall  400. 

The  student  government  had 


originally  planned  to  vote  on  the 
issue  at  last  week's  council  meet- 
ing, but  the  motion  was  tabled  as 
some  council  members  were  not 
prepared  to  discuss  the  item. 

The  Interfratemity  Council 
serves  as  one  of  the  umbrella  orga- 
nizations for  the  greek  system. 

The  sponsorship  issue  has  sur- 
faced several  times  in  the  past 


since  IFC  was  first  desponsored  in 
1992  as  a  result  of  the  discovery  of 
racist,  homophobic  and  sexist  fra- 
ternity songbooks  from  the  Theta 
Xi  and  Phi  Kappa  Psi  houses. 

Last  year's  council  voted  in 
favor  of  responsoring  IFC.  But  the 
decision  was  overturned  by  the 
Judicial  Board  because  the  vote 
lacked  a  two-thirds  majority  man- 


dated by  undergraduate  govern- 
ment bylaws. 

In  October  1994,  IFC  was 
denied  sponsorship  again  when 
another  motion  failed  by  one  vote. 
The  Panhellenic  Council,  the 
organization  for  sororities  which 
had  originally  removed  itself  in 
solidarity  with  IFC.  was  respon- 
sored. 


Graduating  Bruins  may 
feel  last-minute  jitters 


By  Usa  Marie  Weyh 

Final  exams  are  approaching  once 
again,  but  some  students  are  not  con- 
cerned about  PTEs.  They  are  not 
stressing  over  which  classes  will  be 
available  next  quarter.  They  will 
never  need  to  purchase  anotljer  .sched- 
ule of  classes. 

In  less  than  a  month,  a  number  of 
Bruins  will  be  switching  their  tassels 
from  the  right  to  the  left,  as  they  bid 
farewell  to  UCLA. 

After  four,  or  maybe  even  five  to 
six  years  of  pulling  all-nighters  and 
participating  in  midnight  screams,  the 
time  for  them  has  finally  come. 

And  as  the  long-awaited  day  of 
graduation  approaches,  last-minute 
jitters  for  concerned  degree  candi- 


dates abound. 

"I'm  really  excited  about  graduat- 
ing, but  very  sad  that  1  will  not  be 
walking  on  the  campus  anymore," 
said  senior  business  economics  stu- 
dent Becky  Jeng.  "Now  that  some  of 
the  construction  is  clearing  up,  it 
makes  me  sadder  that  I  won't  be  here 
to  enjoy  the  campus.  It's  .so  beauti- 
ful." ! 

These  mixed  emotions  are  common 
among  leaving  seniors,  commence- 
ment officials  .said.  But  the  real  fears 
come  when  the  student  thinks  they  are 
eligible  to  graduate  but  in  actuality, 
are  not. 

"We  recommend  for  those  who 
have  declared  candidacy  to  pick  up  a 

See  GRADUATION,  page  6 


V 


2      Tuesday,  May  23, 1995 


Daily  Bruin  News 


What's  Brewin'  Today 


Community  Service  Commission 

Applications  for  Community  Service 

Commission  1995-96  Staff  now  available,  due 

Wednesday,  May  24 

Kerckhoff408 

825-2333 


Meals  on  Wheels 

Volunteers  urgently  needed  to  deliver  meals  to 
the  ill,  elderly  and  other  homebound  people 
Call  JoannaVasquez  at  394-7558  for  more 
information 


Westwind  -  UCLA's  Journal  of  tfieArir 

Free  copies  now  available 
Any  campus  library 
794-49^6 


8  a.m. 


Alpha  Gamma  Omega 

Rock-A-Thon  -  36  hours  of  rocking  in  chairs  to 

raise  funds  for  American  Cancer  Fund  for 

Children 

Westwood  Plaza 

208-6351 


Noon 


Baha'i  Club 

General  meeting 
Ackerman  2410 
479-32(X) 


Noon  -  4  p.m 


UCLA  Peer  Health  Counselors 

Irec  cold  medication  and  first  aid,  low-cost 

contraceptives 

Kerckhoff40l 

825-8462  . 


12:15  p.m. 


University  Catholic  Center 

Catholic  rosary  group 
Ackerman  3516 
208-5015        / 


1  p.m.  ~  3  p.m. 


Department  of  Biostatistics 
Free  statistical  consulting 
Public  Health  A I -237 
206-6346 


3  p.m. 


Undergraduate  English  Association 

Workshop  on  wniing  personal  statements 

Ackerman  2408 

825-1389 


4:15  p.m. 


College  of  Letters  &  Science  Academic  Support 
Workshops 

Subject  lo  dismissal  group 
(irillin  Commons  203 
825-9315 


4:30  p.m. 


USAC 

US  AC  meeting 

Kerckhoff  4(K) 

825-7068 


5  p.m. 


Chinese  Student  Association 

General  meeting  -  election/debate 

LATC  Press  R(X)m 

443-9790 


5:45  p.m. 


Hlllel  Students  Association 

Dorm  Network 

Hedrick  Private  Dining  Room 

208-3081 


6  p.m. 


African  Education  Project 

6th  Annual  F:i-Hajj  Malik  Fl-Shabazz  (Malcolm 
X)  Commemoration  -  Strength  Through  Unity 
Rolfe  1 200 
825-0744 


Little  Spari(  Ministry 

Rally 
Haines  2 
209-4536 

Nikkei  Student  Union 

Ccneral  meeting 

Kinsey  5 1 
284-4650 

Pre-medical  Society 

MCAT  Forum 

Knudsen  1220B 

794-3832 

RAZA  Graduation  1995 

General  meeting 
Campbell  1 101 
206-5547 


UCLA  Photographic  Society 

Kerckhoff  Photo  Exhibit  Reception 
Kerckhoff  Art  Gallery 
477-1397 


6:30  p.m. 


The  Bodhi  Tree  Annex 

"The  Artist's  Way  Workshop"  by  Mark  Bryan 

8585  Melrose  Ave. 

Cost:  $360  for  twelve  weeks 

659-1733 


7  p.m. 


M.E.Ch.A.  de  UCLA 

Raza  Youth  Conference  Comrhjjttee.meeting 

Ackerman  2408 

206-6452 

UCLA  Circle  K  Community  Service  Club 

General  meeting 
Ackerman  2412 
208-2496 


7:30  p.m. 


Melnitz  Movies 

Free  screening  and  discussion  of  "Miles  of 

Smiles,  Years  of  Struggle'  and  "Nothing  But  a 

Man" 

Melnitz  Theater 

825-2345 

Midnight  Special  Bookstore 

Jerry  Stahl,  acclaimed  Hollywood  writer  and 
former  junkie,  reads  and  signs  his  new 
autobiography  "Permanent  Midnight" 
1 3 1 8  Third  Street  Promenade 
393-2923 

Women  For: 

"Justice  or  Injustice:  Docs  the  Jury  System 

Work?" 

University  Synagogue,  1 1960  Sunset  Blvd. 

Cost:  $5 

.657-7411 


8  p.m. 


Enigma  -  UCLA  Science  Fiction  &  Fantasy  Club 

General  meeting 
Ackerman  2412 
794-5459 


9  p.m. 


UCLA  Amateur  Radio  Club 

Amateur  Radio  Club  "Net" 
448.55  MHz  (PL  127.3) 
559-7175 


10:30  p.m. 


Calico  Soul 

Free  concert  by  a  ten  piece  punk  orche<»tra  with 
six  UCLA  students 
Roxy  on  Sunset 
824-0645 


If  your  organization  would  like  an  event  listed 
in  this  sectioni,  please  fill  out  a  listing  request 
form  in  225  Kerckhoff  by  2  p.m.  the  day  before 
publication.  The  deadline  for  listings  to  ap[>ear 
in  Monday's  paper  is  2  p.m.  Thursday.  Please  ' 
address  questions  to  Listings  Editor  Ayako 
Hagihara  at  206-0904. 


Correction 


In  the  May  9  issue  of  the  Bruin,  the  Associated  Press  story 
"Connerly  denies  preferential  treatment"  was  erroneous.  This  is 
the  AP  correction: 

SACRAMENTO  —  Based  on  incorrect  information  supplied 
by  Kent  Smith,  executive^irector  of  the  Energy  Commission,  the 
Associated  Press  report^  erroneously  on  May  7  that  University 
of  California  Regent  Ward  Connerly  registered  as  a  minority 
businessman  before  receiving  a  1989  Energy  Commission  con- 
tract for  $1,1  million. 

Smith  said  he  erred  when  he  told  the  San  Francisco  Chronicle 
that  the  contract  was  awarded  under  the  state  affirmative  action 
lai^he  AP  story  was  based  on  the  Chronicle's  account. 


In 


»ue. 


the  article  "Grad  donrr^esidents  appreciate 
quiet  environment"  contain^ed  a  wrong  name.  Graduate  student 
Mone't  Parham  i^a  resident  assistant  in  Hershey  Hall. 


isst 


the 


In  the  same 
contained  two  mi 
Regent  Terrence  Wooie 


article  "Regents  feel  the  sting  of  protest" 
d  names.  The  correct  names  are  student 
egent  Meredith  Khachigian. 


The  Bruin  regrets  the  errors. 


Clarification 


In  the  May  19  issue,  the  article  "Merced  chosen  as  10th  UC"  con- 
tained an  unclear  quote.  UC  officials  confirmed  the  statements  made 
by  Merced  supporters  that  a  new  campus  would  dry  out  the  water  in 
Madera  County  and  kill  agriculture.  The  Bruin  regrets  any  confusion. 


Viewpoint  Columnist  applications  are  rK>w  available  In 

the  Dally  Bruin  offices  at  Kerckhoff  225.  Since  Monday  Is 

a  holiday,  they  will  be  due  Tuesday,  May  30.  Contact 

Lucia  Sanchez  at  825-2216  for  more  information. 


Daily 
Bruin 


Volume  CXXXIV.  Numbtr  127 
May  23. 1*95 


Editor  In  ChM :  Mate*  Gold 
Editor  In  Tralnlny:  Roxarw  Marquez 


Managing  Editor:  Jannifar  Laa 
New*  Editor:  Tram  Nguyan 

Aaat.  Nawa  Editors:  G)l  Hopenstand. 

Julw  Silva,  Donna  Wong 

WIra  Edttor:  Jamas  Snydar 
Viewpoint  Editor:  Mtchala  Keller 

Asst.  Viewpoint  Editor:  Roxane  Marquez 
After  Hourt  Editor:  AimeA  Wilcox 
AAE  Editor:  Victor  Chen 

Aaat.  AAE  Editora:  Oeniae  Cruz. 

Michael  Horowitz,  Robert  Stevens 
Sporta  Editor:  Lawrence  Ma 

Aaat.  Sporta  Editora:  Metiasa  Anderaon, 

Enc  Branch,  Scott  Vamaguchi 
Senior  Copy  Editor:  Ponnie  Collins 

Aaat.  Senior  Copy  Editor:  Laurel  Davia 

Copy  Editora:  Mary-Rose  Abraham, 

Amy  Daurio,  Elizabeth  Eacobedo, 

Michele  IHaydel,  Megan  Kennison, 

Annmane  Liermann,  Negin 

Mirmirani.  Rachanee  Snsavasdi.Tncib 

Voehl 
Senior  Production  Editora:  Anna  Andrews. 

Birle  Schoiz 
Deaign  Director:  Brian  Ng 

Deaigners:  Kent  Lim,  Damon  Seeley 

Paglnatora:  Brenton  Mar,  Trances  Poon 


Art  Director:  Jino  Ok 

Aaat.  Art  Director:  Amber  Keller 
An  Staff:  Jerry  Bui,  Susan  Chot,  Tama  ' 
Gonzalez-Ortega,  Melanie  Oltamura, 
Peter  Zaslav 

Photography  Editor:  Andrew  Schder 
Aaat  Photography  Editors: 
Jonathan  Ferray,  Audrey  Lee 
Staff  Pholograpi>era:  Nicklas  Alters. 
Steve  Kim,  Atiby  MosiiowiU,  Scott  O,  Amy 
Pang,  Justin  Warren 

Senior  Staff  Writers: 

News:  Phillip  Carter.  Nancy  Hsu 

AAE:  Jennifer  Richmond,  i^^ichael  Tatum 

Sporta:  Tim  Costner,  Eather  Hui 

SUff  Writara: 

Newa:  Michael  Howerton,  Patnck  Kerkstra, 

Allyssa  Lee.  Kimberty  Mackesy,  Jennifer 

Mortta.  Rashmi  Nijagai.  Betty  Song 

AAE:  BartMira  Herrwindez. 

Lael  Loewenstem.  John  Mangum 

Sporta:  Enc  Bllllgmeter,  Hye  Kwon, 

Christian  Schretber 

After  Houra:  Adnenr^  Dortch 

Editor  In  Chlef'a  Aaat.:  Wendy  Lee 

Llatlnga  Editor:  Ayako  Hagihara 

Sporta  Box  Compiler:  Sean  Daly 


Salaa  Manager:  Jerry  Wertznrian 

Aaat.  Sales  Managers:  Tyson  Harper, 
Ron  Mehrens,  Abdula  Tovirfigh 
Account  Executives:  Dan  Binn, 
Bnan  Bruskrud.  Naomi  Cooper, 
MaQ  Damalio.  Dwaia  Davis.  f>ets 
GielrNsk,  Lisa  Gild,  Msrfl  Goidbarg, 
Bruce  Kember,  Matt  Misaaklan,  Chris 
Nunes.  Matt  Shapiro,  Shawn  Silk 

Operationa  Manager:  Julte  Ohara 
Aaat.  Managera:  Michael  Johnson, 
Erie  Yang 

Operationa  Staff:  Jenny  Evenson.  Jennifer 
Hansen,  Andrew  Jones,  Ann  Lovell,  Iwleosn 
iWlcCanhy  Laune  Wu 


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Aaat.  Managers:  Tina  Chiu, 
Michelle  Gosom 

Classified  Une  SUff :  Becky  Barth, 
MarlSMBowman,  Kelly  Chung, 
Chris  Osgrool,  Scott  Kim,  Alsx  Lesser, 
Jeremy  Lh^,  Carrie  Macy 

Claaaifled  DIaplay  Manager:  AHison  Zweig 
Claaalfled  Display  Staff:  Simon  Hamlm, 
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CreatKre  Staff:  Danny  Chang,  Dons  Mao, 
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Production: 


Advertlalng  Production  Manager: 

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Daily  Bruin  News 


Tuesday,  May  23, 1995      3 


USE  IN  COLLEGE 

Students  drink  less  but  many 
still  binge  heavily,  studies  find 

By  Hedyeh  Melamed 


The  college  years  -  a  time  of 
cumpetition,  deadlirtes,  self- 
idcHiily  and,  somewhere 
along  the  line,  findmg  time  lo 
release  tensions  and  anxieties. 

For  many,  this  time  to  unwind, 
escape  or  socially  interact  incorpo- 
rates the  use  of  one  substance: 
alcohol. 

Even  so,  students  seem  to  be 
drinking  less,  according  to 
a  UCLA  study  of 
300,000  students 
published  on  the 
front  page  of  The 
New  York  Times 
in  February.  These 
statistics  suggest  that 
attitudes  are  changing  and 
health  consciousnfess  is  on  the 
ri.sc. 

Since  the  early  1980s,  studies 
show  modest  declines  in  alcohol 
u.se  among  college  students  nation- 
ally. Still,  the  proportion  of  stu- 
dents who  consume  alcohol  in 
excessive  amounts,  known  as  binge 
drinking,  remains  high. 

A  recent  report  on  binge  drink- 
ing, published  in  Christian  Century, 


surveyed  17,592  students  orfHO 
campuses.  The  study  found  that  44 
percent  of  the  students  had  bingqd 
in  the  previous  evening.  It  made  lit- 
tle difference  whether  the  schools 
were  small  or  large,  public  or  pri- 
vate, with  liberal  drinking  policies 
or  strict  ones:  Students  binge. 

Another  survey  of  more  than 
7,000  students  in  New  York  State 
colleges    found    heavy 
drinking  (use  of  an  aver- 
^      age  of  more  than 
V  J    one      ounce      of 
'- '    absolute  alcohol  per 
day  in  the  past  .1 1 
days)  was  reported  by 
22  percent  of  all  respon- 
dents. 

Men  were  reported  twice  as 
likely  to  be  heavy  drinkers  as 
women. 

In  terms  of  gender,  research  has 
concluded  that  college  men  are 
more  likely  than  college  women  to 
use  alcohol,  and  consume  it  more 
frequently  in  excessive  amounts. 
Upon  entering  college,  females 

See  ALCOHOL,  page  8 


Abstinence  gains 
college  following 


Some  say  the 
approach  not 
realistic  for  all 


By  Ailysta  Lee 

Daily  Bruin  Staff 

When  engaged  in  the  heat  of 
themioment,  saying  "no"  to  sex 
may  not  be  such  an  easy  thing 
to  do. 

In  an  era  where  "condom"  is 
an  everyday  word  and  "safe 
sex"  is  impounded  into  the 
minds  of  people  everywhere, 
young  adults  are  sometimes 
placed  in  situations  where  they 
feel  they  can't  refuse  "going  all 
the  way." 

Just  ask  Adam  Peacocke. 

Peacocke,  a  UCLA  alumnus, 
described  the  pressures  he  felt 


to  follow  the  footsteps  of  his 
sexually  active  peers. 

"Because  I've  been  really 
strongly  involved  in  athletics, 
there  tends  to  be  certain  stereo- 
types associated  with  it,"  said 
Peacocke,  a  1992-93  member 
of  the  UCLA  men'«  volleyball 
team.  "It  can  be  hard,  absolute- 
ly ...  I  was  a  Sig  Ep  and  for  a 
while  I  was  involved  in  a  very 
serious  relationship  -  some- 
times you  can  get  into  very, 

See  ABSTINENCE,  page  12 


Scholars  discuss  early  feminist 


Project  remembers 
life  of  17th'Century 
nun,  writer,  poet 

By  Laryssa  Kreiselmeyer 

UCLA  hosted  an  international 
conference  of  scholars  last  week  on 
a  little  known  subject  -  Sor  Juana 
Ines  de  la  Cruz. 

The  17th  century  Mexican  nun  is 
remembered  for  her  literature  and 
her  unique  status  as  a  female  writer 
and  feminist  during  a  lime  when  it 
was  unaccepted. 

John  Heridra,  project  coordinator 
at  the  Center  for  Medieval  and 
Renaissance  Studies,  said  that  Sor 
Juana  was  a  good  topic  for  the  con- 
ference because  "she  isn't  that  well 
known  or  studied  in  the  United 
States." 

"She's  the  first  woman  who 
wrote  about  the  whole  aspect  of 
feminism  within  the  context  of  the 
social  and  political  time  and  in 
defense  of  women  during  the  1 7th 


H06L  BAUTISTA 

Arts  perfornnances  were  added  to  an  international  conference  of 
scholars  discussing  the  life  and  works  of  Sor  Juana  Inet. 

century  when  women  weren't  sup-  With  conference  sponsorship 

posed  to  write  or  develop  their  from  thcCentcr  and  a  grant  from 

minds,"  said  Stacy  Ziegenbein,  a  the  National  Endowment  for  the 

graduate  student  who  is  currently  Humanities,  coordinating  profes- 

working  on  an  independent  study      ■ 

of  the  writer.  See  CONHIMINCE,  page  13 


4      Tuesday,  May  23, 1995 

0 


Daily  Bruin  News 


Israel  discontinues 
confiscation  plans 

JERUSALEM  —  Israel  suspended  its  lat- 
est decision  to  confiscate  Arab  land  r'n 
Jerusalem,  defusing  a  furor  today  that  had 
threatened  to  topple  the  government  and 
damage  Israel's  emerging  lies  with  the 
Arab  world. 

The  government  was  in  danger  of  col- 
lapse after  five  Arab  legislators  whose 
support  is  crucial  submitted  no-confi- 
dence motions  to  protest  Israel's  plan  to 
seize  140  acres  of  mostly  Arab  land  to 


build  homes  for  Jews.  But  the  motions 
fell  after  the  government  reversed  its  pol- 
icy. 

The  hawkish  opposition  had  hoped  to 
seize  the  opportunity  to  topple  the  gov- 
ernment even  though  it  supports  confis- 
cating land  in  east  Jerusalem. 

Yeltsin  to  visit  Iran 
and  sell  reactors 

NICOSIA,  Cyprus  —  Russian 
President  Boris  Yeltsin,  who  plans  to' 
sell  nuclear  reactors  to  Iran  despite 
strong  U.S.  objections,  is  planning  his 
first  visit  to  Iran,  its  news. agency 
reported  today. 

The  Islamic  Republic  News  Agency 
quoted  the  Russian  ambassador  to 
Tehran,  Sergei  Tretiakov,  as  saying  the 
visit  aimed  to  bolster  Moscow's  ties 
with  Iran  and  promoting  regional  coop- 
eration. 

Tretiakov  d^d  not  mention  a  specific 
dale  for  Yeltsin's  visit,  but  he  said  dis- 
cussions were  underway  on  that  issue. 

IRNA  quoted  an  unidentified  Iranian 
Foreign  Ministry  official  as  saying 
Yeltsin  was  expected  in  the  early  fall. 


Judge  sets  Nichols 
free  without  bail 

DETROIT  —  James  Nichols,  whose  broth- 
er and  a  friend  are  charged  in  the 
Oklahoma  bombing,  was  ordered  released 
without  bail  Monday  despite  a  prosecutor's 
suggestion  that  he  was  involved  in  the 
attack. 

"There  is  not  an  iota  of  evidence  that  he 
is  a  danger  to  others,"  U.S.  District  Judge 
Paul  Borman  ruled.  Nichols  has  been  held 
since  two  days  after  the  bombing  on 
charges  of  making  small  explosives  aUiis 


Michigan  farm. 

During  the  hearing.  Assistant  U.S. 
Attorney  Robert  Cares  suggested  Nichols 
may  have  played  a  role  in  the  Oklahoma 
City  attack  along  with  his  brother,  Terry, 
and  Timothy  McVeigh. 

Faulty  seatbelts 
prompt  auto  recall 

WASHINGTON  —  The  Transportation 
Department  plans  to  recall  Japanese- 
made  seat  belts  on  millions  of  cars  sold 
from  1 986  through  1 99 1  because  of  con- 
cerns the  buckles  sometimes  fail  to  latch 
or  unlatch,  government  sources  said. 

Eleven  automakers  -  eight  Japanese 
and  the  U.S.  Big  Three  -  have  8.77  mil- 
lion vehicles  with  the  Takata  Corp.  seat 
belts  for  those  years. 

,  The  National  Highway  Traffic  Safety 
Adniinistration  tentatively  scheduled  a 
news  conference  J"or  Tuesday  to 
announce  the  safety  recall,  which  would 
be  one  of  the  largest  in  history. 

At  least  63  injuries  -  but  no  deaths  - 
have  been  reported  from  accidents  where 
the  belts  were  used,  according  to  NHTSA 
documents. 


Supreme  Court  rules 
against  term  limits 

WASHINGTON  —  The  Supreme  Court 
dealt  a  devastating  blow  to  backers  of 
congressional  term  limits  tAonday,  ruling 
5-4  that  states  cannot  limit  service  in 
Congress  without  amending  the 
Constitution. 

Leaders  of  the  term-limit  effort  cau- 
tioned Washington  insiders  against  cele- 
brating the  court's  decision,  saying  voters 
will  continue  to  demand  an  end  to 
entrenched  incumbency. 

Twenty-two  states  had  taken  steps  sim- 
ilar to  the  Arkansas  measure  strucic  down 
by  the  court.  The  sweeping  decision 
spells  doom  for  all  such  state  efforts. 

The  court  likewise  ruled  that  Congress 
cannot  impose  term  limits  for  its  own 
members  by  merely  enacting  a  statute. 

Pentagon  develops 
blinding  laser  arms 

WASHINGTON  —  Human  rights  groups 
are  criticizing  the  Pentagon  for  develop- 
ing laser  weapons  with  the  potential  to 
blind  enemy  soldiers,  arguing  that  they 
could  open  a  new,  more  inhumane  kind  of 
arms  race. 

A  decision  may  come  as  early  as  next 
month  on  whether  to  approve  full-scale 
production  of  an  Army  weapon,  called 
the  Laser  Countermeasure  System,  which 
fires  a  beam  powerful  enough  to  blind  a 
person  1 ,000  yards  away. 

The  Army  acknowledges  the  hazard 
but  insists  the  weapon  -  and  two  others  it 
also  is  working  on  -  are  not  intended  to 
be  used  against  an  enemy's  eyes.  The 
main  purpose,  the  Army  says,  is  to  dis- 
able electro-optical  systems. 


Brown  to  step  down 
if  40  votes  come  in 

SACRAMENTO  —  Assembly  Speaker 
Willie  Brown  surprised  lawmakers 
Monday  by  saying  he  will  step  aside 
without  a  fight  if  someone  can  get  40 
votes  to  succeed  him. 

Brown,  who  is  a  Democrat,  said  he 
wanted  to  spare  the  Assembly  further 
turmoil. 

Brown  hung  onto  the  speakership 
through  political  skill  and  guile  after 
Republicans  appeared  to  win  a  majority 
in  the  Assembly  last  November.  The 
Assembly  now  is  divided  with  39 
Democrats,  39  Republicans  and  two 
vacancies,  and  has  accomplished  little. 

Republicans  are  expected  to  pick  up  a 
40th  vote  on  June  7,  the  day  after  a  spe- 
cial election  in  Los  Angeles  County. 

Fire  at  high  school 
thought  to  be  arson 

SAN  JOSE  —  A  suspected  arson  fire  at  a 
high  school  quickly  grew  to  six  alarms 
Monday,  damaging  four  classrooms  and 
collapsing  a  ceiling. 

About  100  firefighters  battled  the  fire 
at  Yerba  Buena  High  School  for  almost 
three  hours  before  bringing  it  under  con- 
trol. 

The  fire  "had  a  good  start  and  got  to 
the  attic  before  it  was  found,"  said  Fire 
Inspector  John  Pieper. 

The  blaze  started  in  a  trash  can  placed 
next  to  a  wall,  according  to  the  prelimi- 
nary investigation. 

The  ceiling  of  one  breezeway  col- 
lapsed while  crews  fought  the  fire. 

Compiled  from  Bruin  wire  services. 


The  UCLA  Chicano/Latino  Film  and  Television 

Association  invites  you  to  the 


Nuevas  Visiones,  Nuevas  Voces 


Film  Festival 


-  New  Visions,  New  Voices  - 

A  presentation  of  new  films  by  Chicana/o  and  Latina/o  students  of 
the  UCLA  School  of  Theater,  Film  and  Television 

With  Special  Guests,  Alumni  Filmmakers 

Moctesuma  Esparza,  Producer  of  The  Milagro  Bean  Field  War  and  Gettysburg, 
and  special  appearance  by  Jenny  Gago,  Actress  from  Mi  Famiiia 

Thursday,  May  25, 1995. 7:00  p.m. 
Gala  Reception  Follows 

Melnitz  Theater 
University  of  California,  Los  Angeles 

Funded  by  the  Campus  Programs  Committee  of  the  Program  Activities  Board. 

-Co-Sponsored  by  the  Chicano  Studies  Research  Center 

and  the  Department  of  Film  and  Television. 

For  information  call  (31 0)  280-0259. 

1 

•    Admision  es  Gratis    •    Admision  es  Gratis    •    Admision  es  Gratis    • 


Daily  Bruin  N«ws 


TiMMlay,  May  23, 1995       S 


HITS 


DANNY  ELFMAN 

SPEAKS 

Tuesday,  May  30 

5-6:30pnn 
Melnitz  Theater 

Tickets  available  at  Melnitz 

Theater.  Co-sponsored  by 

Melnitz  Movies  and  the  School  of 

Theater,  Film,  and  Television. 
A  twenty-five  minute  screening  (»f  film 
clips,  followed  by  a  ciuestion  and  answer 
Ve  early  Seating  will  be 
14()9Melnit/ Hall. 


session.  Arrive  ear 
lirnited. 


Wed. 
Thurs,  & 

Friday 
7:30pm 


ACKERMAN 

GRAND        I 
BALLROOM 
$2  EACH  NIGHT 


r^^ 


Annette  Bening 

Oscar  nominated  iKtrcs.s  tor 
The  Griftcrs,  star  of  Bugsy, 
l,ove  Affair,  Regarding 
Henry,  Guilty  By 
Suspicion,  Valmont,  .md 
iipconiinv;  The  American 
President 

Laura 
Shuler-Donner 

rrodiicor  of  Dave,  Free  VVillyv 

Ladyhawke,  St.  Elmo's  Fire,  Pretty 

in  Pink,  nnJ  upcoming  Free  Willy  II 


Robin 
Swicord 

'   Writer  of  Little 

j  Women,  Perez 
,      Family,  Shag,  and 
)      upcoming 
IVlatilda 

Mimi  Polk  Gitlin 

rrodiKvr  for  Thelma  &c  Louise,  The 

Browning  Version,  ,\nd  the 

upcoming  While  Squall, 

production  associate  for  Black  Rain 


r  •!•  !-••     '  rw               u  moderator 

Lili  Fini  Zanuck  Denise 

Oscar  winning  producer  of  ^^ 

Driving  Miss  Daisy,  director  JVlann 

o\  Rush,  producer  of  Cocoon,  Vice  Chair  o\ 

Rich  in  Love,  .\nd  irpcoming  UCLA 

, ...„;. .  _  .lis  and  Department  of 

Wild  Bill.  Film  and 

Television, 

^,      ...          Y      1  J.'  Independent 

Christine  Lantl  Producers 


^^,       •     ••  T       1  J.'  inuepenue 

Christine  Lantl  Producer 

Oscar  nominated  actress  for  Swing     Program 
Shift,  star  of  Running  on  Empty, 
The  Doctor,  Gross  Anatomy, 
Leaving  Normal,  Hideaway. 


annua 


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ACKERMAN  CRANI)  BALLROOM 

WEDNESDAY,  MAY  24    2:00- 3 :30PM 


6      Tuesday,  May  23, 1995 


Daily  Bruin  News 


RENO 


From  page  1 

pie"  for  other  law  schods. 

Reno  was  also  presented  the 
UCLA  Medal  for  "her  guiding 
vision  ...  of  a  society  unblemished 
by  violent  crime,  civil  rights  abus- 
es, environmental  blight,  impover- 
ished families  and  neglected 
children." 

In  his  award  presentation 
speech,  Chancellor  Charles  Young 
called  Reno  a  ''tenacious  champi- 
on of  justice"  and  spoke  of  her 
"lifetime  of  public  service." 

Recent  recipients  of  the  award 
TncTude  scTentist  Carl  Sagah7 
President  Bill  Clinton  and  former 
Israeli  Prime  Minister  Shimon 
Peres. 

Reno  reminded  the  graduates 
not  to  forget  their  own  families 
while  working  hard  on  their 
careers  and  to  always  take  the  time 
to  spend  with  children.  She  shared 
u  memory  of  her  own  mother,  who 
taught  her  to  play  baseball  and  to 
enjoy  poetry  and  Beethoven. 


"There's  no  substitute  for  what 
that  lady  was  in  my  life,"  she  said. 
Reno  confronted  issues  of  child- 
rearing  herself  when  she  received 
custody  of  15 -year-old  twins. 

"Raising  children  is  a  lot  differ- 
ent than  practicing  law,"  she 
explained,  and  said  that  she 
learned  a  lot  about  it  really  fast. 

She  said  that  she  can  still 
remember  the  names  of  her  ele- 
mentary and  high  school  teachers 
as  well  as  the  dean  of  the  Harvard 
Law  School,  who  supported 
women  seeking  law  degrees  when 
it  was  difficult  for  women  in  that 
field. 

Though  Reno  expressed  respect 
fbrUCLA^s  law  schooland Its 
other  "great  institution"  of  basket- 
ball, she  said  that  she  believed 
something  is  wrong  in  a  society 
where  athletes  are  paid  six  figure 
salaries  and  teachers  are  barely 
paid  at  all. 

"1  can't  just  talk  and  you  can't 
just  clap,"  she  said.  "We've  got  to 
do  something  about  it  (by  giving) 
kids  security  and  a  positive 
chance." 


GRADUATION 

From  page  1 

copy  of  their  degree  progress 
report  at  Murphy  Hall,"  said 
Randy  Cirilo,  supervisor  of 
degree  section.  'This  gives  them 
an  opportunity  to  doublecheck  if 
they  have  completed  the  require- 
ments for  their  rtiajor." 

Many  unexpected  problems 
may  arise  before  and  after  com- 
mencement if  the  senior  fails  to 
follow  directions  and  meet  dead- 
lines, commencement  officials 
sajd. 
"Deadlines  have  passed  as  far 


as  declaring  candidacy  and  hav- 
ing the  student's  name  appear  in 
the  commencement  program," 
said  Melinda  Lee,  coordinator  of 
Letters  &  Science  commence- 
ment ceremonies.  "At  this  point 
we  can  only  make  changes,  but 
absolutely  no  additions  can  be 
made  to  the  commencement  pro- 
gram ...  right  now  we  are  on  auto 
pilot,  just  waiting  for  graduation 
day  to  come." 


The  registrar's  office,  located 
in  Murphy  Hall,  has  a  list  of  all 
those  who  have  identified  them-  • 
selves  as  degree  candidates.  The 
list  then  allows  the  staff  to  con- 
firm that  the  students  have  in  fact 
completed  the  requirements 
which  make  them  eligible  to  grad- 
uate. 

"If  a  student  has  declared  can- 
didacy and  all  the  requisite  cours- 
es are  completed,  they  will  not 
hear  from  us,  and  it  will  be  up  to 
them  to  make  sure  things  run 
smoothly,"  Cirilo  explained. 
"However,  we  will  send  out  let- 
ters to  those  seniors  who  are  short 
in  units  to  let  them  know  that  they 
will  have  to  declare  candidacy  at 
a  later  time." 

A  similar  situation  happened 
for  Jeng  when  she  received  a  let- 
ter from  the  degree  auditors  in  the 
registrar's  office. 

"I  was  very  scared  when  a 
week  ago  I  got  a  letter  saying  I 
Would  be  unable  to  graduate 
because  I  was  short  in  units," 
Jeng  said.  "But  I  knew  I  had  com- 
pleted  everything,  so  1  went  to 


Murphy  and  it  was  no  problem  to 
clear  it  up." 

However,  unit  deficiencies  are 
not  the  only  concern  for  degree 
candidates.  Officials  said  students 
need  to  make  sure  transcripts 
from  other  colleges  appear  on 
their  UCLA  record  in  order  to 
avoid  mixups.  Soon-to-be  gradu- 
ates are  also  recommended  to 
make  sure  professors  have  report- 
ed the  correct  grades  to  Murphy 
Hall. 

Even  with  all  of  the  administra- 
tive pressures  of  graduation,  there 
is  still  room  for  fun  and  exciting 
activities  such  as  ordering 
announcements,  picking  up  cap^ 
and  gowns  and  of  course  planning 
graduation  parties. 

Memorabilia  such  as  diploma 
covers,  perma  plaques  and  sou- 
venir tassels  are  available  for  stu- 
dents to  purchase  at  Graduation 
Et  Cetera,  located  in  Ackerman 
Union. 

"It's  coming  down  to  the  wire," 
said  Janis  Kelly,  manager  of 

See  QRADUATION,  page  8 


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8      Tuesday,  May  23, 1995 


Daily  Bruin  News 


GRADUATION 

From  page  6 

Graduation  Et  Cetera.  "Those 
wishing  to  order  announcements 
or  other  things  should  come  quick- 
ly. At  this  point  I  won't  turn  any- 
one away,  but  we  can't  promise 
anything." 

This  section  of  Ackerman  offers 
discounted  graduation  packages 
that  include  caps  and  gowns, 
announcements  and  other  memo- 
rabilia. Kelly  said  this  makes  it 
easier  fpr  the  student  to  order. 


"Caps  and  gowns  are  available 
for  pick-up  in  the  Plaza  Building." 
Kelly  said.  "They  are  open  six 
days  a  week  and  will  even  be  open 
on  commencement  weekend, 
allowing  graduates  to  pick  up  their 
cap  and  gown  last  minute." 

As  if  this  is  not  chough  for 
degree  candidates  to  worry  about, 
there  are  also  senior  portraits  and 
class  rings  to  order.  Then  there  are 
yearbooks  and  diplomas  to  pick 
up. 

However,  when  graduation  day 
arrives,  UCLA  will  offer  .some- 
thing that  Bruins  will  never  forget. 


It's  not  the  distinguished  guest 
speakers  or  the  tear-jerking  pro- 
cessional -  it's  better.  It's  free 


UCLA  will  offer 

something  that  Bruins 

will  never  forget ...  free 

parking. 

parking. 

There  will  no  longer  be  a 
charge  of  $5  for  ceremony  park- 
ing, officials  said. 


ALCOHOL 


From  page  3 

seem  more  likely  to  abstain  from 
alcohol.  However,  recent  follow- 
up  studies  on  snjdents  and  alcohol 
use  throughout  college  has  indi- 
cated that  the  gap  between  the  two 
sexes  decreases  as  students 
[Progress  in  their  college  careers. 

"The  narrowing  gap  in  the 
drinking  practices  of  men  and 
women  is  probably  attributable  to 
changing  norms  surrounding 
drinking  by  women  and  the  move- 


ment toward  greater  equality 
between  men  and  women  in 
behaviors  once  regard^  as  gender 
specific,"  said  Michael 
Prendergast,  an  assistant  research 
historian  with  the  UCLA  Drug 
Abuse  Research  Center. 

Medical  experts  have  discov- 
ered that  the  causes  contributing  to 
high  consumption  of  alcohol  are 
different  for  women  and  men. 

Women  who  report  having  a 
current  or  past  drinking  problem 
express  having  perceived  parental 

See  ALCOHOL,  page  9 


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ALCOHOL 


From  page  8 

rejection  and  depression,  poor 
mother-daughter  relationships, 
physical  abuse  by  a  parent,  unhap- 
py childhood,  maternal  alcohol 
problems,  suicidal  thoughts  and 
feelings  of  worthlessness. 

Men  reveal  having  overly  per- 
missive parents,  frequent  parental 
anger,  frequent  conflicts  with  par- 
ents, delinquent  behavior  and  feel- 
ings of  unproductivity. 

The  common  link  between  both 


sexes  are  reported  feelings  of 
exhaustion. 

.  If  one  takes  race  and  ethnicity 
into  account,  a  survey  conducted 
by  Schall  and  Maltzman  in  1992, 
found  that  among  undergraduates 
at  UCLA  (mainly  freshmen)  whites 
had  the  highest  level  of  drinking, 
followed  by  Latinos,  Native 
Americans,  African  Americans, 
Asian  Americans  and  Pacific 
Islanders. 

College  residency  can  also  great- 
ly influence  students'  consumption 
of  alcohol.  Prendergast  maintains 
that  abstinence  is  the  highest 


among  students  living  at  home  and  . 
lowest  among  those  living  indepen- 
dently off  campus. 

Other  research  has  examined  the 
link  between  fraternities  and  sorori- 
ties and  alcoholic  behavior.  In  a 
study  of  fraternities  of  4 1  different 
colleges  in  29  states,  Kodman  and 
Sturmack  report  that  two-thirds  of 
the  fraternity  chapters  had  a  bar. 

Friend  and  Koushki  claim  that 
the  social  context  and  experiences 
of  college  students  in  their  first 
year  may  have  significant  impact 
on  the  further  development  of 
drinking  and  drug  use  patterns. 


'The  culture  of  the  campus,  the 
opportunity  to  be  independent  of 
daily  parental  control,  the  need  to 
conform  and  the  insecurity  of  a 
new  intimidating  setting  <dl  make  a 
freshman  vulnerable,"  said  L.D. 
Eigen  of  the  office  for  Substance 
Abuse  Prevention . 

"Alcohol  is  made  readily  avail- 
able,  and  it  becomes  an  important 
part  of  the  college  socialization 
process,"  Eigen  explained. 

Researchers  report  that  many 
students  consume  alcohol  to  cope 
with  the  vast  amount  of  pressure  to 
succeed  schol'astically. 


College  students  are  more  likely 
to  consume  alcohol  at  high  levels 
than  afe  young  adults  without  a 
college  degree.  But,  according  to 
Prendergast,  the  decline  in  alcohol 
use  since  about  1980  has  occurred 
among  adolesceftts,  college  stu- 
dents and  young  adults  in  college. 

Binge  drinking,  hciwever, 
escapes  this  statistic. 

From  1980  to  1992.  heavy  drink- 
ing declined  by  12  percent  for  high 
school  students  and  by  9  percent 
for  non-College  young  adults. 

~^      See  ALCOHOL,  page  10 


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Multi-Cultural  Awareness  •  Wellness  •  Nutritional  Health 


ALCOHOL 


t?v 


From  page  9 

But  less  than  1  percent  of  col- 
lege students  reported  decreased 
binge  drinking. 

These  high  levels  of  alcohol  use 
conflict  with  research  indicating 
that  those  more  highly  educated 
are  more  likely  to^dopt  healthy 
behaviors. 

College  graduates,  in  compari- 
son to  those  without  a  high  school 
diploma,  have  a  lower  prevalence 
of  smoking,  are  le^s  likely  to  be 
overweight  and  more  likely  to  use 
seat  belts,  Prendergast  said.         

But  along  the  spectrum  of  alco- 
hol use,  where  do  we  draw  the  line 
between  a  social  drinker,  a  moder- 
ate drinker  or  one  who  may  in  fact 
have  a  serious  alcoholic  problem? 

'The  liquor  industry  is  not  will- 
ing to  define  what  exactly  is  mod- 
erate drinking,  which  creates  a  lot 
of  confusion.  The  National 
Institute  of  Alcohol  Abuse  and 
Alcoholism  defines  heavier  drink- 
ing as  someone  who  has  two  or 
more  drinks  of  alcohol  per  day," 
said  Earnest  Noble,  a  Pike 
Chairman  for  Alcoholism  and  a 
professor  of  Alcohol  Studies  at 
UCLA. 

"This  may  sh(x:k  many  students, 
because  the  average  for  UCLA  is 
three  per  day,  which  categorizes 
the  majority  of  us  as  heavy 
drinkers,"  Noble  explained. 

"iVe  may  not  be  drinking  on  a 
daily  basis,  but  when  a  special 
occasion  arises,  such  as  li  basket- 
ball event,  students  binge  and  they 
do  not  know  how  to  handle  their 
liquor,"  Noble  added. 

Male  students  at  UC  San  Diego, 
surveyed  in  1992,  had  fewer  drug- 
related  problems  than  those  report- 
ed by  students  of  the  same 
university  in  1980. 

Increased  awareness  of  the  con- 
sequences of  drug  abuse  have 
encouraged  college  students  to 
abstain  from  illicit  drugs,  because 
they  perc'eive  it  as  too  risky  and 
dangerous,  according  to  Bachman, 
Johnson  and  O'Malley. 

However,  those  in  the  alcohol-  > 
related  medical  fields,  believe  thai 
students  are  consuming  large 
amounts  of  alcohol  as  a  subsutulc 
for  drugs. 

The  effects  of  excessive,  pro- 
longed drinking  include  temporary 
memory  loss,  absenteeism  from 
sch{K)l  or  work  and  loss  of  friends 
due  to  intoxicated  behavior,  health 
officials  said. 

Because  alcohol  travels 
throughout  the  body  in  the  blood- 
stream, it  has  contact  with  virtually 
every  important  organ.  Whether  it 
causes  damage  seeihs  related  to 
the  person's  genetic  vulnerability, 
the  frequency  of  his/her  drinking 
and  the  length  of  drinking  binges.     * 

Other  factors  include  bkxxl  and 
alcohol  levels  attained  during  the 
period,  and  whether  the  body  is 
given  lime  to  recover  from  the 
binge,  btdlSn  oflicials  said. 

"AlpQ^  il  cett  toxic  and  per- 
ffleMf  4  lie  tissues  in  the  body. 
Wi0imf0$G\me  it  impairs  a>gni- 
tfvie  fMNffbming.  damages  the 
liver,  causes  liypertension,  anemia 
and  increased  risks  of  cancer," 
Noble  explained. 

"At  UCLA  it  is  estimated  that 
20  to  25  percent  of  our  college 
campus  experiences  problems  with 
alcohol,"  he  said.  "I  see  students 
arrive  in  the  emergency  rOom  at 
UCLA  with  cardiac  failure, 
because  alcohol  aflecis  the  heart's 
amiractility. 

"Some  of  them  die  on  the  spot,** 
Noble  added. 

Within  the  college  environment, 
many  of  the  observable  conse- 
quences associated  with  alcohol 
consumption  involve  academic 
performance,  crime  and  sexual 


See  ALCOHOL,  page  U 


riMMIi 


INK  SMUDGE  ON  PAGE 


Daily  Bruin 


TuMday,  May  23, 1995    U 


ALCOHOL 


From  page  10 

promiscuity.         ' 

"In  regards  to  academic  perfor- 
mance, the  use  of  alcohol  has  clear 
effects  on  memory,"  Noble  said. 
"Registration  is  whipped,  you  lose 
your  sharpness  and  instead  you 
become  uninhibited.  This  causes 
many  students  to  have  difficulty 
focusing  and  preparing  for  upcom- 
ing examinations. 

"Eventually  some  students  com- 
pletely lose  their  motivation  and 
drive,  and  drop  out  of  school 
because  of  their  substance  abuse," 
"Noble  reported. 


In 'regards  to  crime,  alcohol  has 
been  associated  with  cases  of 
breaking  and  entering,  sexual 
offenses  such  as  rape  and  mali- 
cious mischief. 

A  national  survey  published  by 
Ross  in  the  Journal  of  Clinical 
Psychology  indicated  that  about 
one-fourth  of  acquaintance  rapes 
involve  the  use  of  alcohol  by  the 
victim,  the  assailant  or  both  on  col- 
lege campuses. 

"Men  still  have  the  majority  of 
the  obvious  problem  when  it 
comes  to  heavy  drinking.  We  see 
theui  more  involved  with  acci- 
dents, fights  and  drunken  behavior 
There  is  at  least  a  three  to  one  ratio 
of  men  having  these  problems  in 
these  areas  of  crime  over  women," 
Noble  said. 

Another  significant  issue  is  the 
link  between  sex  and  alcohol. 

The  frequency  and  quantity  of 
alcohol  consumption  was  signifi- 
cantly associated  with  the  number 
of  sexual  partners  respondents  had 
over  a  period  of  three  months, 
according  to  a  study  published  in 
the  Journal  of  Youth  and 
Adolescence  in  February  1995. 

Out  ol  262  students  that  were 
observed,  alcohol  preceded  the  last 
occurrence  of  sexual  activity  for 


ratv 


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the  majority  of  those  sexually 
active. 

Men  were  more  likely  to  drink 
heavily  (five  or  more  drinks)  prioi* 
to  intercourse  than  women. 

Many  reported  they  cither  did 
not  use  or  were  less  likely  to  use 
condoms  when  they  consumed 
alcohol  prior  to  having  sex. 

Kor  decades  there  has  been  con- 
troversy and  debate  over  whether 
or  not  heredity  plays  a  pertinent 
role  in  alcoholism. 

Noble,  a  bi(x;hemist,  psychiatrist 
and  former  head  of  the  National 
Institute  of  Alcohol  Abuse  and 
Alcoholism,  said  he  has  dedicated 
his  life  to  studying  the  effects  of 
alcohol.  Currently  a  leading 
researcher  here  at  UCLA,  Noble 
discovered  the  gene  linked  to  alco- 
holism. 

'I"he  receptor  gene  for  dopamine, 
which  is  a  chemical  that  aids  the 
brain  in  relaying  information,  has 
been  known  to  involve  pleasure- 
seeking  behavior  such  as  alco- 
holism. 

The  dopamine  receptor  has  two 
gene  variations  (A-1  and  A-2) 
which  determine  alternative  char- 
acteristics in  inheritance. 

It  is  specifically  the  A-l  gene 
that  is  ass(x:iated  with  alcoholism. 

"By  drinking  alcohol,  we  stimu- 
late these  pleasure  molecules  and 
feel  reward  and  leisure,"  Noble 
said.  "Many  alcoholics  don't  have 
adequate  amounts  of  this  gene 
form,  and  when  they  flood  these 
receptors  with  dopamine  they  feel 
really  gcKxl." 

Noble  believes  that  those  who 
test  themselves  and  are  found  to 
possess  this  gene  are  not  d(N)med 
to  become  an  alcoholic.  They  sim- 
ply have  a  genetic  predisposition  to 
the  disease. 

Social  and  cultural  factors,  or 
the  environment  in  which  we  place 
ourselves,  may  increase  the 
chances  of  alcohol  abuse  and 
addiction,  Noble  stressed. 


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ABSTINENCE 

From  page  3 

serious  situations." 

But  to  Peacocke,  there  was  defi- 
nitely another  option. 

"Because  of  the  amount  of  con- 
viction I  had  (for  saving  sex  until 
marriage),  I  was  very  active  in 
pursuing  my  faith,"  Peacocke  said. 
"(My  convictions)  keep  the  issue 
fresh  in  my  mind." 

Epitomized  in  popular  media 
culture  through  such  characters  as 
Donna  Martin  on  "Beverly  Hills, 
90210,"  a  growing  trend  toward 
abstinence  -  challenging  youngs 
adults  to  save^sejrtbr  marriage"-^ 
has  garnered  new  attention. 

The  raovemeiuTocuses  on  posi- 
tive alternatives  to  encouraging 
virginity  -  such  as  freedom  and 
respect  -  rather  than  strictly  for- 
bidding young  adults  to  have  sex. 

Peacocke  is  a  part  of  a  new 
advertising  campaign  sponsored 
by  the  Family  Research  Council 
(FRC),  a  Washington  D.C. -based 
research  and  advocacy  organiza- 
tion that  hopes  to  make  abstinence 
the  new  sexual  revolution. 

The  movement  involves  five 
pro-abstinence  ads,  encouraging 
young  people  to  "Save  Sex"  for 
marriage.  Two  ads  have  appeared 
in  Seventeen  and  Rolling  Stone 
magazines. 

"It's  the  only  campaign  that  pre- 
sents a  positive  rea.son  for  saving 
sex  for  marriage,"  said  David 
Chamberlin,  FRC  special  assistant 
to  the  vice  president  for  policy. 
"I'm  23  and  have  remained  absti- 
nent, and  it's  something  I  firmly 
believe  in.  Scripturally  and  logic- 
wise,  it's  a  good  choice. 

According  to  an  FRC  research  . 
summary,  the  proportion  of  18-  to 
25-year-olds  who  believe  in  stay- 
ing abstinent  before  marriage  has 
risen  6  percentage  points  since  the 
mid-1970s,  and  62  percent  of  all 


sexually  experienced  females  said 
they  "should  have  waited."  Other 
findings  indicate  that  .saving  sex 
for  marriage  reduces  the  risk  of 
divorce,  and  monogamous  married 
couples  are  the  most  sexually  sat- 
isfied Americans. 

Some  UCLA  students,  however, 
said  the  abstinence  campaign 
might  not  work  with  college-level 
students. 

"The  AIDS  epidemic  has  awak- 
ened people  to  abstinence  and 
advantages  for  it,  but  for  the  most 
part,  people  will  do  what  they 
want  to  do,"  said  Vincent  Harper,  a 
third-year  electrical  engineering 
student.  "People  think  they're 
intelligent  and  will  make  the  best 
decisions  for  themselves." 

Some  students  said  later  vc\^x- 
riages  will  impede  on  a  person's 
willingness  to  save  sex. 

"Times  have  changed,"  said 
Thu  Anh  Trieu,  a  fourth-year  polit- 
ical science  student.  "People  are 
getting  married  later,  so  it's  not 
really  feasible  to  wait  until  mar- 
riage." 

Many  students  remarked  that 
saving  sex  \yas  a  personal  choice. 

"I'd  encourage  (ab.stinence)  and 
it's  the  safest  route,  but  I  personal- 
ly don^t  practice  it,"  said  Adam 
Zaffos,  a  third-year  physiological 
science  student.  "It's  not  for  every- 
one, but  if  thatN  what  you  want  to 
do,  I'm  not  going  to  condemn  it." 

Peacocke,  however,  said  his 
decision  to  stay  true  to  his  belief  is 
firm. 

"If  someone's  made  that  choice 
to  stay  abstinent,  the  amount  of 
conviction  will  make  a  big  differ- 
ence as  to  how  hard  or  easy  it's 
going  to  be,"  Peacocke  said.  "Ofie 
thing  to  do  is  not  to  make  the  deci- 
sion in  the  heat  of  the  moment,  but 
have  time  to  think  about  it  -  to  talk 
to  people  -  someone  who  is  con- 
vinced one  way  and  .someone  who 
is  convinced  the  other,  and  try  to 
get  perspective  that  way." 


V  ^ 


Daily  Bruin  News 


Tuesday,  May  23, 1995    13 


CONFERENCE 

From  page  3 

sors  Jose  Pascual  Buxo  from 
UCLA  and  Susana  Hernandez 
Araico  from  Cal  Poly  Pomona 
drew  upon  the  talents  of  professors 
in  Europe,  Mexico  and  the  United 
States. 

Despite  the  languages  spoken  at 
their  home  universities,  most  of  the 
professors  presented  their  papers  on 
the  life  and  works  of  Sor  Juana  in 
Spanish.  Topics  ranged  from  the 
"dangerous"  sexuajity  of  her  works 
to  the  conventions  of  musical 
expressions  and  up  close  analysis^ 
of  the  images  of  "Dream"  and  'The 
Divine  Narcissus." 

Experts  explained  that  Sor  Juana 
used  Greek  stories  to  frame  some  of 
her  writing  as  well  as  working  with 
original  material. 

She  i.v  best  known,  they  said,  for 
her  controversial  attacks  on  the 
domination  of  men  over  women 
with  such  lines  as,  "stupid  men  who 
accuse  women  without  any 
grounds,  without  .seeing  that  you 
are  the  cause  of  the  very  things  that 
you  blame,"  in  her  most  famous 
poem! 

"She  was  the  most  intelligent 
woman  of  her  time  and  every  time 
we  study  her,  she  becomes  better 
known,"  Buxo  said. 

Sor  Juana  was  bom  in  165 1  on  a 
little  farm  to  the  southeast  of 
Mexico  City,  in  what  was  then 
called  New  Spain.  At  that  time  her 
name  was  Juana  Ramirez  de  Asbaje 
until  she  took  her  vows  as  a  nun. 

In  Mexico  City,  Sor  Juana  grew 
into  a  child  of  three  and  persuaded 
her  sister's  teacher  to  instruct  her 
in  reading  and  writing  Latin.  After 
20  lessons,  Sor  Juana  mastered  the 
language  and  at  the  age  of  eight, 
began  writing  the  beginnings  of 
plays. 

While  spending  time  in  the  court 
"OfThe  viceroy,  earning  patronage  as 
a  prodigal  child  and  writer,  Sor 
Juana  dedicated  her  life  to  studying 
and  enriching  her  mind^  Araico 
.said. 

^  She  was  unable  to  attend  a  uni- 
versity as  a  woman.  In  response  to 
this  restriction,  she  built  her  own 
library  at  Saint  Jerome's  convent. 
Even  now,  it  is  unknown  exactly 
how  many  books  the  library  con- 
tained, conference  professors 
agreed. 

There  Sor  Juana  used  her  b<K)ks 
as  a  "window"  into  the  world  after 
choosing  to  take  her  holy  vows. 
She  initially  believed  that  taking  the 
vows  would  stop  her  from  studying 
and  further  learning,  said  Professor 
Marie-Cecile  Benassy-Berling 
from  Universite  de  Paris,  Sorbonne. 

However,  her  belief  in  intellectu- 
ally equality  led  Sor  Juana  to  find 
solidarity  with  other  women,  said 
Anne  Cruz,  professor  from  UC 
Irvine. 

But  others  believe  that  Sor  Juana 
most  likely  got  her  independent 
spirit  from  her  mother  who  raised 
six  illegitimate  children  in  the  very 
traditional  colonial  environment, 
said  Georgina  Sabat-Rivers,  profes- 
sor at  the  State  University  of  New 
York  at  Stony  Brook. 

This  year  marks  300  years  since 
Sor  Juana  died  while  attempting  to 
nurse  fellow  nuns  during  an  epi- 
demic. In  celebration  of  her  life, 
conferences  similar  to  the  UCLA 
gathering  have  already  taken  place 
in  Mexico,  Spain,  Texas  and  New 
York. 

"This  has  been  an  excellent  con- 
ference and  it  is  important  for  its 
content,"  said  Buxo,  who  added 
that  he  was  pleased  with  the  confer- 
ence's Success. 

During  her  final  years,  the  writer 
known  as  the  'Tenth  Muse"  gave 
up  writing  and  her  lifelong  studies 
after  accusations  from  members  of 
the  Jesuit  order  that  she  did  not  lead 
enough  of  a  spiritual  life,  and  that 
hw  works  were  "profane." 


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Facing  a  'perverse  preoccupation'  witli  race 


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Arc  Arfiericans  obsessed  with  the  issue 
"oTrace?  It's  beerrdescrifeec^as  a  perverse^ 
and  excessive  preoccupation.  I  looked  up 
"perverse"  in  my  American  Heritage 
Dictionary.  Here's  what  it  says: 

per  verse  (per-vursV,  pur- vurs)  adj.  1 . 
Directed  away  from  what  is  right  or  good; 
perverted.  2.  Obstinately  persisting  in  an  ■ 
error  or  a  fault;  wrongly  self-wiHed  or 
stubborn.  3. a.  Marked  by  a  disposition  to 
oppose  and  contradict,  b.  Arising  from 
such  a  disposition. 

As  an  Asian-American  woman,  I  am 
confronted  with  the  reality  of  this  exces- 
sive preoccupation  with  race  everyday. 
Take  it  from  me,  it's  perverse. 

It  always  begins  with  a  friendly  opening 
imc.  Nine  out  of  10  times,  a  non-Asian 
male  will  ask  the  dreaded  question,  intend- 
ed as  a  friendly  ice-breaker: 
.  "Hi.  Arc  you  Filipino?" 

Today,  that  friendly  ice-breaker  made 
my  blood  boil. 

A  white  male  approached  me  while  I 
was  in  line,  wailing  for  my  lunch.  "Excuse 
nic.  Miss.  Are  you  Filipino?"  In  a  very 
controlled,  matter-of-fact  tone,  I  said,  "I'm 
sorry.  I  refuse  to  answer  that  question.  I 
never  answer  that  question.  I  think  it's  rude 
when  people  ask  me  that  question,  espe- 
cially before  even  asking  my  name." 

He  was  flabbergasted.  He  safd,  "Since 
when  docs  a  person  have  to  ask  someone's 
name  before  asking  a  question?  Well, 
jhaf  s  a  new  one.  I've  never  heard  that  one 
before."    ' 

"Well,  I  hear  it  all  the  time,"  I  replied. 

He  obviously  didn't  understand  why  I 
was  so  upset.  He  claimed  he  was  just  "try- 
mg  to  be  friendly." 

Actually,  he  was  trying  to  stereotype 
me.  It's  usually  a  hit-and-run  que«)tion. 
People,  not  the  least  bit  curious  about  who 
I  am,  will  ask  me  what  I  am  and  then  dis- 
appear. Obviously,  my  appearance  makes  it 
clear  that  I'm  Asian.  But  they  always  want 
to  know  what  kind  of  Asian  I  am.  Well, 
I'm  the  kind  that  doesn't  like  being  asked. 

My  least  favorite  is  what  I've  termed  the 
"ignorant  question": 

"Hi.  What's  your  nationality?" 

W4th  smug  satisfaction,  I  always  turn  to 
the  person  and  answer,  "I'm  American." 
This  frustrates  people.  And  I  don't  give 
them  a  break,  either.  They  goon  to  ask 
where  I'm  fFom.  I  tell  them  I'm  from  San 
Francisco.  When  it  gets  to  the  point  where 
they  are  asking  me  where  my  parents  were 
born,  I  usually  let  them  have  it.  "Why 
would  I  tell  you  where  my  parents  were 
born?  I  don't  even  know  your  name." 

I  tell  them  it  bothers  me  when  people 
ask  about  my  ethnicity  because  I've  been 
wondering  my  whole  life;  I'm  adopted. 
That's  not  true,  but  it  makes  them  feel  very 
awkward. 

My  non-Asian  friends  tell  me  I  should 


be  flattered.  They  say  that  people  see  me 
as  exotic  and  want  to  fmd  out  more  about 
me.  Well,  you  can't  find  out  very  much 
about  me  by  trying  to  categorize  me  into 
some  stereotype.  No  one  ever  has  pulled 
up  next  to  me  in  a  car,  rolled  down  the 
window  and  asked  me  my  name,  if  I'm  a 
student  or  what  my  hobbies  andinterests 
are.  The  last  lime  that  occurred,  Iwas 
asked,  "Are  you  Thai?"  I  said  no,  and  he 
drove  off. 

I  will  be  the  first  to  admit  that  I  have 
also  been  curious  about  the  ethnicity  of 
others.  Whenever  I  meet  people  from  a  for- 
eign country,  I  usually  ask  them  where 
they  are  from.  The  difference  is,  I  ask 


about  their  background  after  I  have  already 
learned  other,  more  pertinent  information 
about  them. 

When  people  try  to  stereotype  rfie,  they 
really  can't  glean  very  much  about  me.  But 
their  use  of  stereotypes  tells  me  everything 
I  need  to  know  about  them.  I  might  not 
know  them,  but  I  know  their  kind.  They  are 
the  victims  of  their  own  stereotypes.  But  of 
course,  they're  too  blind  to  see  it. 

Just  becau.se  I  may  look  like  someone 
you  once  knew  does  not  mean  that  I  am 
necessarily  just  like  her.  The  last  time 
someone  told  me  I  looked  just  like  a  girl 
he  used  to  date,  I  told  him,  "Well,  you  look 
just  like  a  guy  I  turned  down  for  a  date." 


It's  funny,  he  sounded  just  like  him,  too. 

Today,  when  that  man  asked  me  the  hit- 
and-run  question,  I  was  tempted  to  counter 
with  a  question  of  my  own.  "Do  you  play 
the  banjo?"  I  mean,  obviously  he  was  white. 
Maybe  I  just  want  to  know  what  kind  of 
white  person  he  was.  For  instance,  was  he  a 
banjo-picking  bigot,  who  was  only  interest- 
ed in  me  for  my  race?  I  think  so.  But  asking 
if  he  played  the  banjo  wouldn't  really  gel 
me  the  answers  I  wanted. 

Of  course,  I'd  never  ask  a  complete 
stranger  a  question  like  that.  It  would  be 
too  perverse. 

Bautista  is  a  senior  sociology  student. 


Letters 


Wliat  price  do 
we  pay  for  a 
'bucolic'  UCLA? 

Editor: 

I  would  like  to  propose  the 
question:  Does  Mardi  Gras  turn 
a  profit?  Has  an  environmental 


impact  study  ever  been  complet- 
ed on  Mardi  Gras?  How  do  you 
put  a  value  on  clean  air,  with 
tens  of  thousands  of  cars  driving 
to  Mardi  Gras? 

What  is  the  cost  to  the  infra- 
structure for  the  wear  and  tear  on 
the  roads  and  parking  structures? 
Simply  check  out  the  roads  from 
Gayley  to  Veteran  to  see  the  dam- 


age already.  Dcics  anyone  care? 

What  is  the  environmental 
impact  when  you  fill  Pauley 
Pavilion?  Our  honorable  mayor 
tells  us  that  there  is  not  enough 
money  available  in  the  form  of 
tax  revenues  to  repair  L.A.'s 
infrastructure.  So  obviously,  we 
will  proceed  to  destroy  what  is 
left.  The  classic  "pay  now  or  pay 


later"  -  we  will  definitely  pay 
many  times  more  later. 

I  will  leave  you  with  this 
thought.  What  price  do  you  put 
on  a  bucolic  campus?  A  campus 
conducive  to  thought,  study  and 
conversation?  UCLA  today  is 
certainly  not  such  a  campus. 
Think  about  this. 

Also,  could  not  the  School  of 


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Urban  Planning  or  School  of 
Engineering  at  UCLA  perform 
an  environmental  impact  study 
on  these  UCLA  events  -  a  full 
study,  including  infrastructure 
and  quality  of  campus  life? 

D.J.  Schuite 

Network  for  Public  Education 

and  Social  Justice 


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Daily  Bruin  Viewpoint 


Column 


TuMday,  May  23, 1995    15 


Five  years  and  counting ...  and  still  no  major 


George 
Tsai 


Sadistic  poodle  neuterings, 
anal  hair  implants,  rodent 
enemas  and  navel  lint  cloth- 
ing. Nose  hair  grooming,  toe  jam 
aphrodisiacs,  enlarged  nipple 
piercings  and  genital  sunbathing. 
Insect  pomog-  ' 

raphy,  phlegm 
soft  drinks, 
earwax  nutri- 
tion and  chi- 
huahua mating 
-calltr. 

You'd  think 
Murphy  Hall 
administrators 
would  be 
going  nuts  by 
now  trying  to 
keep  up  with 
my  bimonthly 

major  , 

changes.  You'd  probably  expect 
the  URSA  woman  to  be  muttering 
"Again?!"  or  "Still?!"  whenever  I 
punch  in  my  UCLA  ID  number 
and  then  the  pound  sign. 

Well,  I  have  a  confession  to 
make.  I'd  hate  to  break  it  to  you, 
but  some  of  the  majors  I've  listed 
as  my  own  can't  exactly  be  found 
in  the  course  catalog. 

In  fact,  I  haven't  done  exten- 
sive studies  on  any  of  these 
majors;  OK,  maybe  one  or  two, 
but  you're  going  to  have  to  guess 
which  one.  I  never  even  had  a 
major  to  begin  with.  Sad,  isn't  it? 

I  remember  submitting  my  first 
article  last  summer.  One  of  the 
Viewpoint  editors  asked  me  what 
sh£  could  put  down  as  my  major, 
^ng  undeclared  for  over  four 
years,  I  wasn't  sure  how  to 
respond.  I  began  feeling  insecure, 
a  sense  that  I  didn't  belong  in  this 
college  world  anymore.  Everyone 
else  had  sOme  title  after  their 
names  to  show  readers  they  had 
direction.  Just  read  any  other 
columnist  and  you'll  find  out  that 
soT^id-so  is  a  senior,  double 
majoring  in  neuropsychophys- 
ioanthrobiopolitical  chemistry 
and  dance.  But,  here  I  was.  A 
fifth-year  senior  with  nothing. 
Damn,  I  had  to  say  something. 

"Castration,"  I  blurted  out.  That 
was  that. 

"No  major  in  more  than  four 
freakin'  years?!"  you  may  be  ask- 
ing. "How  the  hell  is  someone 
able  to  be  an  undeclared  senior 
and  get  away  with  it?  What's 
been  going  on  during  this  whole 
goddamn  time?  When  is  this 
piece-of-crap  bald  guy  graduating 
anyway?"  Well,  if  you'd  stop 
cussing,  maybe  I  could  get  in  a 
word  or  two. 

Geez,  you're  starting  to  sound 
like  my  parents. 

Wow,  where  to  begin?  In  my 
five  years  here,  I've  done  so 
much.  Unfortunately,  none  of  it 
has  been  academic.  An  F  here,  a 
"Drop"  there,  an  "Incomplete" 
el.sewhere.  No  units  coming  in,  12 
a  quarter,  only  one  summer 
school  course.  I  really  can't  really 
explain  this  poor  performance. 
Maybe  it's  a  pathetic  rebellion 
against  my  strict  and  sheltered 


would  bring  up  examples  of 
buildings  that  were  open,  then 
closed  and  then  reopened  once 
again  during  my  time  here. 

I  would  talk  about  the  bountiful 
grassy  areas,  parking  structures, 
stairways  and  floors  that  once 
existed.  I  would  inform  the 
tourists  about  why  I  decided  to 
come  to  UCLA  instead  of 
Berkeley  or  Irvine:  I  hated  the 
Cal  attitude,  and  Anteater 

ijitory  looked^obe^s^ 
construction  zone. 

"Silly  me,"  I'd  reply  sarcasti- 
cally. An  uneasy  silence  would 
ensue  as  all  attention  would  then 
focus  back  on  the  tour  guide. 
"Uh,  why  don't  we  talk  about 
Janss  Steps  and  the  guy  buried 
underneath?"  would  be  the 
guide's  awkward  response.  The 
group  would  walk  away  and  I 
would  walk  to  my  third  rotation 
of  G.E.  classes  with  a  smirk  on 
my  face. 

Aw,  who  am  1  kidding?  It's 
really  unnerving  being  stuck  in 
school  while  watching  your 
friends  move  on  to  bigger  and 
brighter  things:  mardage,  kids, 
careers,  addresses  without  an 
apartment  or  box  nurnber.  Well, 
since  I'm  from  Barstow,  the  kids 
came  early  in  high  school,  so  I'm 
used  to  that.  Hverylhing  else, 
though  ... 

Hey,  wait.  How  about  the 
opportunity  for  a  simultaneous 
father-child  graduation?  At  the 
pace  I'm  going.  111  be  able  to 
have,  say,  a  daughter.  I  would 
raise  her.  have  her  go  to  college, 
and  then,  finally,  I'd  graduate 
right  alongside  hci.  ll  would 
make  the  1 1  p.m.  local  news  and 
my  15  minutes  ol  fame  would 


upbringing.  It  could  be  an  attempt 
to  disprove  my  "Most  Intelligent" 
yearbook  title  in  high  school  just 
for  being  an  Asian,  a  rarity  in 
Barstow. 

C'mon,  psych  majors.  Help  me 
out  here. 

Whatever  it  is,  all  motivation 
has  been  depleted  and  senioritis 
left  over  from  1 2th  grade  is  on  its 
six-year  streak. 

What's  worse  is  thinking  about 
next  year.  Nope,  no  graduation 
this  June.  Another  year  of  living 
by  the  quarter  system,  another 
year  of  construction.  Not  only 
that,  I  will  soon  be  in  school  with 
those  who  were  barely  hitting 
puberty  when  I  first  arrived  at 
UCLA.  So,  now  there's  nothing  , 
to  do  but  attempt  to  justify  my 
extended  stay  here.  What  advan- 
tage does  a  long-term  undergrad- 


uate have  over  someone  else  who 
comes  in  with  a  kazillion  units 
and  graduates  in  three  years'^ 

How  about  the 
opportunity  for  a 
simultaneous  father- 
child  graduation? ... 
Forget  the  degree  ...  As 
long  as  I  can  continue 

to  fall  through  the 

loopholes  of  Murphy 

Hall,  I'll  be  fine. 

One  acronym:  GOMP.  Grumpy 
Old  Man  Privilege.  Anyone  who 
stays  here  for  just  a  .short  amount 


of  time  will  not  have  many  oppor- 
tunities to  complain  to  classmates 
and  tell  "When  I  was  young"  sto- 
ries. How  many  people  can  say 
that  their  registration  cards  used 
to  have  prices  on  them  or  that ' 
their  reg  fees  were  originally 
$434?  Of  course,  the  fees  have 
skyrocketed  and  now,  UCLA  is 
unable  to  print  the  price  on  the 
cards.  All  that  extra  ink  would 
bankrupt  the  university. 

Listen  to  any  campus  tour 
guide,  and  you  will  hear, 
"Construction?  Oh,  construction 
has  always  been  a  part  of  this  uni- 
versity since  1927."  The  incom- 
ing freshmen  and  their  parents 
will  naively  nod  their  heads  in 
agreement.  Only  those  who  have 
been  here  king  enough  could 
speak  up  against  this  bull.  If  I 
ever  encountered  this  scenario.  I 


finally  happen.  Yes!  This  is  what  I 
have  to  look  forward  to.  Forget 
the  degree.  Forget  the  career 
afterward.  As  long  as  I  can  con- 
tinue to  fall  through  the  loopholes 
of  Murphy  Hall,  I'll  be  fine. 

Or  what  about  this  one'.'  While 
other  fifth-year  students  have 
experienced  the  opening,  closing 
and  reopening  of  buildings,  I'm 
going  for  the  record.  Let  it  be 
declared  that  I  will  not  leave  this 
place  until  I  am  able  to  see  build- 
ings close  and  reopen  ...  twice! 

I'll  have  been  here  so  long  and 
contributed  so  much  reg  fee 
money  to  this  hellhole  they'll 
have  to  name  something  after  me: 
a  lecture  hall,  a  residence  hall  or 
maybe  even  a  bathroom  stall!  I'll 
be  a  legend.  Orientation  coun- 
selors will  start  off  their  tours 
with  "There  once  was  this  bald 
Chinese  guy  ..." 

I  have  found  my  destiny.  Forget 
the  wealth  that  comes  with  a 
degree.  I'll  be  famous.  Ha  ha. 
Power,  corruption,  celeb  status, 
my  face  plastered  all  over  the  ... 

Tsai  is  a  fifth-year  senior 
majorinfi  in  ...  to  he  announced. 
Until lhen,  it's  studying  the  effects 
of  sandpaper  on  hemorrhoids. 
His  column  appears  on  alternate 
Tuesdays. 


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PAGE 


16    Tuesday,  May  23, 1995 


Daily  Bruin  Arts  Jb  Entertainment 


Tuesday,  May  23, 1995    17 


Arts  &  Entertainment 


if 
it 


Caldwell  makes  top 
of  McNally's  'Class' 


By  Jennifer  Richniond 

Daily  Bruin  Senior  Staff 


It  doesn't  matter  if  you're 
studying  lor  a  career  in  the  the- 
*ater  or  not.  Tcrrcnce  McNally's 
"Master  Class" .at  the  Mark 
Taper  is  a  fulfilling  lesson  in 
opera,  life,  courage  and  egotism. 

Revolving  around  the  talent 
and  ego  of  famous  soprano, 
Maria  Callas  (Zoc  Caldwell), 
"Class"  watches  as  three  opera 
students  endure  the  wrath,  rage 
and  tutelage 
of  Callas 
during  her 
Master 
Class. 

Although 
harsh  and 
condescend- 
ing to  her 
students, 
C  a  1.1  a  s 
proves  she 

has  the  right  to  be  this  cutting 
because  of  all  the  problems  she 
endured  on  her  road  to  stardom. 
Her  problems  come  out  inter 


"You  don't  have  a  look  -  get 
one'* ,., .  '    — . 

But  while  McNally's  script 
makes  the  audience  laugh,  he 
also  allows  us  to  sympathize 
with  Callas  and  her  students 
while  giving  us  sorpe  very  valu- 
able lessons  in  life. 

When  Sharon  performs  Lady 
Macbeth  from  Verdi's 
"Macbeth."  and  Callas  insults 
her,  saying  Sharon  lacks  the 
presence  and  "genius"  to  pull 
off  this  role,  the  audience  gasps. 

And  when  Sharon  breaks 
down  and  accuses  Callas  of 
being  cruel  and  jealous  of 
younger  singers,  a  stunned 
silence  hangs  over  the  theater. 
Callas  has  finally  been  given  a 
taste  of  her  own  medicine. 

These  scenes  prove 
McNally's  ability  to  write  com- 
pelling drama  intertwined  with 
cutting  comedy.  It's  these  scenes 
that  explain  how  important  it  is 
to  be  critiqued,  lake  the  lessons 
you've  learned  and  adjust  them 
to  your  own  lifestyle. 


millenlly  while  she's  correcting 
her  students'  work,  and  they 
usually  appear  as  funay  or  sar- 
castic quips  that  evoke  roaring 
laughter  from  (he  audience. 
Fhanks  to  McNally's  bnlliant 


writing,  (alias  is  sharp,  witty 
and  always  cutting.  No  matter 
what  anyone  says,  she  always 
has  some  stinging  comebacks 
and  more  times  than  not  they 
hurt  like  hell. 

Alter  she  gives  a  long  s|)eech 
about  having  a  'l(M)k"  so  people 
will  remember  you,  Sharon 
Cjraham  f  Audra  McDonald) 
walt/es  oul  m  B  long  flowing 
dress  ol  green  velvet  and  taffeta. 

She's  delinitely  got  a  look, 
but  it's  not  what  Callas  had  in 
mind  She  tells  Sharon  point- 
blank  (hat  her  dress  "shf)uld 
never  be  worn  belore  midnight 
and  never  to  a  class."  After  this 
shot.  Callas  sends  Shiiron  off  to 
make  her  entrance  as  Lady 
Macbeth.  Sharon  exits  and  does- 
n't return.  (It's  discovered  later 
that  she  was  in  the  bathroom 
throwing  up.^ 

Ibis  image  captures  the 
power  Callas  has  over  her  stu- 
dents That  power  stems  from 
McNally.  He  has  a  compelling 
way  of  wFiting  No  matter  how 
blunt  (alias  is.  she  always  man- 
ages to  draw  you  in.  The  audi- 
ence can't  help  but  love  when 
she  says  to  various  members: 


—  Ihis  is  where  MeNally 
blends  life  in  the  theater  with 
life  in  general.  But  McNally 
couldn't  have  done  it  alone.  He 
needed  an  tirna/.ing  actress  for 
Callas.  He  lound  U  in  Caldwell. 
She's  g(jt  all  the  punch  and  pres- 


encc  needed  for  this  character. 
Her  brassy  sarcasm  is  right  on 
and  there's  no  doubt  Caldwell  is 
Callas. 

She's  so  egotistical  in  laci, 
Callas  has  two  monologues  giv 
ing  insight  to  her  life.  These  two 
scenes  are  the  only  drawback  to 
the  production. 

While  they  provide  a  wonder 
ful  look  at  how  ('alias  became 
famous,  the  two  scenes  go  on 
for  tfM)  long.  They  become  bor- 
ing and  redundant  as  she  cuts 
back  and  lorth  between  conver- 
sations she  and  the  emotions  she 
remembers  Irom  her  days  on 
stage. 

Once  back  in  the  present 
though.  Callas  learns  to  teach 
with  grace  and  understanding. 
So.  by  the  time  you  leave  this 
classroom  you'll  not  only  know 
'all  there  is  to  know  about  Callas. 
you'll  have  learned  a  valuable 
lesson  in  the  arts  and  in  life 
itself. 


STAGE:  "Master  Class"  Running 
through  June  25  at  the  Mark 
Taper  Forum.  TIX:  $28  -  35.50. 
For  more  info  call  (213)  365- 
3500. 


Zoe  Caldwell  plays  Maria  Callas  In  "Master  Class. 


Introducing  David  Foiey: 


coffee-acliiever  extraordinaire 


Whether  performing  on  'Newsradio'  or  *Kids  in  the  Hall/ 
this  comedian  maintains  his  own  unique  brand  of  comedy. 
He  claims  the  secret  of  his  widespread  success  is  coffee. 


By  Robert  Stevens 

Daily  Bruin  Senior  Staff 


to  me  on  every  sketch  was,  'with  rare  occurrence  since  the  troupe 

or  without  coffee?'"  informally  dissolved  itself  almost 

Foley,  in  t9\yn  today  with  the  a  year  ago. 

omedian  David  Foley  is     rest  of  the  Kids  working  out  the  "I  think  in  part  a  lot  of  people 

what  you  might  call  a  cof-     details  oHhe  "Kids  in  the  Hall"  sort  of  picture  us  always  hanging 

fee-achiever.                            film  project,  has  a  cup  of  Java  in  out  together.  ButAvhen  they  actu- 

Foley,  co-founder  of  the  "Kids     hand  as  he  speaks  to  The  Bruin  ally  see  us  together  something 


C 


in  the  Hall"  comedy  troupe  and 
star  of  NBC's  "Newsradio" 
thinks  that  there  is  a  direct  corre- 
lation between  the  coffee  he 
drinks  and  the  successful  shows 
he's  been  on. 

"I  think  coffee  has  been  linked 
to  most  of  my  achievements 
social  and  professional."  Foley 


I  guess  it  looLs  too 


looks  weird 
staged." 

After  five  years  of  television 
shows  and  1()  years  of  live  per- 
formances, it  should  be  no  sur- 
prise that  fans  generally  picture 


from  his  hotel  room  at  the  Four 

Seasons  in  Beverly  Hills. 

Foley  feels  groggy  from  his 

plane's    five-hour  delay    at 

Toronto  International  airport  the 

night  before.  It  was  a  strange 

night  for  Foley.  Not  only  was  he      Foley  and  the  Kids  as  one  collec- 

stranded  in  an  airport,  be  he  was      live  unit. 

stuck  there  with  the  entire  five-  And  while  this  unit  never  offi- 

says.  "I  always  wanted  to  bring     man  "Kids"  comedy  troupe  -  a     cially  split  up,  it  was  the  troupe 
"back  the  coTTee  achievers  cam-        '  "  '.    ~Z 

paign  from  back  in  the  '70s." 

The  coffee-achievers  cam- 
paign featured  a  series  of  com 
mercials  showing  that  successful 
individuals  from  every  work  field 
benefited  from  the  wonders  of 


members'  extensive  work  togeth- 
er that  led  them  to  take  a  break  ' 
from  "Kids"  comedy. 

"It  was  a  promise  we  made  to 
ourselves  when  we  started  the 
shaw,"  Foley  says.  "We  always 
.said  five  years  was  about  as  long 
as  we  thought  we  should  do  it. 

"More  ih^n  that  it  would  get 
moruHonous.  I'm  glad  wc  actual- 
ly had  the  nerve  to  follow 
through  with  it  and  give  up  the 
steady  gig." 

.So  to  fans  in  Toronto's  airport, 
seeing  the  troupe  back  together 
was  a  dream  come  true. 

At  the  airport  fans  kept  com- 
ing up  to  Foley  and  crew  to  chat. 
Because  Foley's  clean-cut,  boy- 
ish looks  inherently  make  him 
seem  like  a  friendly  guy.  fans 
open  up  to  him  quickly. 

This  often  pqses  a  dilemma  for 


coffee. 

And  this  is  a  category  Foley 
fits  into  quite  nicely. 

Not  only  hys  he  landed  a  ,iar 
ring  role  as  the  displaced  mid- 
westerner  Dave  Nelson  on 
"Newsradio,"  hut  he  also  was  a 
comejly  innovator  on  "Kids  in 
the  Hall,"  dubbed  by  "Saturday 
Night  Live"  founder  Lome 
Michaels  "the  Monty  Python  of 
the '80s" 

All  this  because  of  coffee. 

"On  the  'Kids  in  the  Hall' 
show  I  was  always  writing  a  cup 
of  coffee  into  sketches.  Mostly  so 
I'd  have  it  during  rehearsal  and 
camera  bl(Kking,  but  then  on  the 
show  night  I'd  have  as  much  as  I 
could. 

"I  got  letters  from  people  writ- 
ing in  to  ask  what  my  coffee  con- 
sumption was.  Pretty  much  the    Comedian  David  Foley  explains  the  dissolution  of  the  "Kids  in  the  Hall"  troupe:  "We  always 
prop  department's  first  question    said  five  years  was  about  as  long  as  we  thought  we  should  do  it." 


F'oley  -  arc  the  people  coming  up 
to  him  fans  or  one-time  friends 
he's  been  out  of  touch  with? 

"We're  always  trying  to  figure 
out  if  we  know  the  people  we're 
talking  to.  Sometimes  you  realize 
you're  being  way.  way,  way  too 
familiar  with  these  complete 
strangers  -  and  you'll  actual- 
ly start  to  creep  them  out. 

"It's  like."  and  here 
Foley  speaks  in  the  voice 
of  a  fan,  "'yeah  ...  I  ran 
into  one  of  the  Kids  in 
the  Hall  and  he  was  all 
over  me  ...  he  was  like 
way  to  friendly,  I  mean 
maybe  this  guy's  got  no 
real  friends.'" 

Yes,  life  with  the  Kids 
can  get  confusing  even  for 
hardened  fans.  It  only  gets 
worse  though  when  a  new 
'  aud  lehcc  ex  pec  I  s  good ,  cTeaiT 
comedy  from  the  Kids  and 
instead  gets  some  of  the  most 
racy  material  around. 

It's  taken  a  long  time  for 
America  to  adjust  to  them. 

When  the  Canadian  Kids 
made  their  American  debut  at 
New  York's  West  Bank  Cafe  in 
October  of  I9S7  they  were  virtu- 
ally booed  off  the  stage. 

In  July  ol  1<>>94,  when  the  Kids 
taped  their  last  'IV  show,  they 
still  had  to  do  two  versions  -  one 
version  for  Canada  and  HBO  aria 
a  more  censored  version  for 
CBS 

Foley,  a  vision  of  sweetness 
and  innocence,  says  that  most 
public  TV  viewers  in  America 
never  saw  much  of  his  work. 

"I  actually  had_more  pieces 
outright  cut  by  censors  for  the 
show  than  I  think  anybody  else 
did.  Most  of  the  time  it  would  be 
if  you  did  anything  remotely 
involved  with  religion." 

Foley  remembers  one  particu 
lar  monyloguc  he  wrote  in  whiDti 

See  FOLEY,  .page  21 


t. 


Acoustically  inept  venue  takes  the  Lips  down  In  flames 


Sketchy  sound  and  shoddy  equipment 
undermine  bands'  San  Diego  State  show 


By  Michael  latum 

Daily  Bruin  Senior  Staff 

Anatomy  of  a  disaster: 

The  Flaming  Lips,  with  the  Archers 
of  Loaf  opening,  have  been  scheduled 
lo  play  thfe  Soma,  a  dive  of  a  club  in  San 
Diego  This  is  a  special  kind  of  club,  the 
k-md  where  they  check  you  for  a  knife 
or  a  gun  before  you  enter,  and  if  you 
don't  have  one.  they  give  you  one. 

At  the  last  minute,  however,  the 
forces  that  be  move  the  concert  across 
town,  to  the  impossible-lo-find-cven-if- 
you-know-whcrc-it-is  Back  Door,  at 
San  Diego,  State  University. 

So  what  exactly,  you  might  ask,  is  the 
Back  D(K)r?  Is  it  a  hot  campus  club?  Is 


it  a  hip  eatery,  like  our  own  Cooperage 
(where,  incidentally. 
the  Archers  delivered 
an  exhilarating  per- 
formance last 
March)?  Is  it  a  styl- 
ish amphitheater 
where  said  rock  stars 
can  show  their  stuff 
under  the  stars? 

Tragically,  the 
reality  is  consider- 
ably less  glamorous. 

Imagine  the  two  lounge  areas  that 
.separate  the  north  and  south  wings  of 
UGLA  residence  halls.  Now,  knock  out 
the  wall  that  divides  the  two. 

Presto,  not  only  do  you  now  have  an 


approximate  idea  of  how  big  the  Back 
Door  is,  hut  you  also  have  an  idea  of  its 
decor  (tacky)  and  its  acoustics  (non- 
existent). And  although  the  similarities 
end  with  the  lamentable  absence  of 
comfortable  sofas  or  chairs,  there  aren't 
any  RAs  or  CSOs  either,  which  is  say- 
ing something. 

But  wait,  it  doesn't  .stop  there.  Your 
condiment  stand  resembles  the  same 
one  you've  seen  at  UCLA  basketball 
games.  The  security  consists  of  a  couple 
of  kids  who  sit  at  a  desk  next  to  an 
archaic  turnstile.  The  sound  system 
could  very  well  have  been  on  loan  from 
the  l(x;al  elementary  school. 

Not  your  idea  of  a  choice  venue,  you 
say?  To  be  fair,  it  should  be  added  that 
the  Back  Door  is  conveniently  situated 
next  to  the  campus  bowling  alley  -just 
the  thing  to  soothe  the  nerves  of  disap- 
pointed fans  and  easily  irritated  rock 
critics. 


Just  so  the  wrong  people's  feelings 
don't  get  hurt,  neither  the  Lips  or  the 
Archers  should  be  blamed  for  this  deba- 
cle. Both  performed  adequately  under 
the  circumstances:  The  Lips,  who  did 
their  set  in  a  barrage  of  soap  bubbles, 
.sounded  much  more  electric  and  much 
less  novel  than  they  do  on  their  albums, 
while  the  Archers,  though  notably  slug- 
gish in  spots,  still  remain  one  of  the 
greatest  indie  rock  bands  to  catch  live, 
both  visually  and  musically. 

But  the  sonics  of  both  acts  were 
marred  by  the  inefficient  sound  system 
("This  amp  is  gonna  explode  any 
minute,"  warned  the  Archers'  Rric 
Bachmann,  and  he  didn't  sound  like  he 
was  kidding).  The  room's  acoustics, 
which  swallowed  all  of  the  sound,  did- 
n't help  either.  The  vocals  were  com- 
pletely unintelligible:  the  instruments 
were  almost  indistinguishable  from  one 
another. 


Small  bands  have  it  rough,  that's  for 
sure.  In  particular,  bands  like  the 
Archers  of  Loaf  (signed  to  Alias,  a 
small  label  in  Burbank)  are  their  own 
roadies,  technician<i,  etc.  But  how  arc 
these  small  bands  ever  going  to  convert 
new  listeners  under  such  appalling  cir- 
cumstances? 

The  previous  night,  both  bands  put 
on  a  show  at  I^s  Angeles'  Palace,  a  far 
kinder  venue.  But  here's  the  rub:  The 
fans  at  both  this  and  Back  I3oor  con- 
certs probably  paid  close  to,  if  not  the 
exact,  same  ticket  price. 

Pity  those  San  Diegans  who  blew 
(heir  hard  earned  dough  to  see  these 
bands  in  San  Diego  they  should  haVc 
skipped  thcirThursday  and  Friday 
obligations  and  taken  the  train  up  to 
LA. 

And  pity  the  U)s  Angeles-based  rock 
critics  who  should  have  chosen  to  slay 
at  home. 


Th«  Raining  Ups  gave  a  more  ic  but  les&than  novel  perforiTunu  c  at 

Sap  Diego  State  University's  Back  Door  this  weekend. 


-r 


18    TtiMday,  May  23, 1995 


Terminal  Velocity  (Hollywood) 

The  charm  that  this  flick  once  had 
was  almost  used  up  by  the  time  its 
short  big  screen  stint  ended. 
Video  kills  whatever  chance 
Charlie  Sheen's  sarcasm  stood  to 
redeem  a  poor  action  thriller.  He 
plays  a  sky-diving  school  rene- 
gade named  Ditch  whose  last 
trainee  of  the  day  (Nastassja 
Kinski)  ends  up  bouncing  off  the 
desert  ground.  As  the  place  is  shut 
down  and  the  incident  is  investi- 
gated, Ditch  begins  to  find  out 
he's  a  pawn  in  an  international, 
post  Cold- War  scheme.  The  entire 
film  acts  as  a  setup  for  the  snazzi- 
est of  adventure  sequences,  where 
Kinski,  in  the  trunk  of  a  car,  is 
hurled  out  of  an  airplane  thou- 
sands of  feet  from  the  ground. 
Add  a  gun-toting  villain  and 
action  hero  Ditch,  and  the  scene 
overcomes  the  film  itself.  Shoddy 
acting  all  around  and  a  poor  script 
add  to  the  woes  of  Terminal 
Velocity.  Sheen,  who  presumably 
saw  the  light  after  this  film  fell 
without  a  parachute  and  switched 
agencies,  better  start  picking  bet- 
ter films  than  this.  M.H.    B-  . 


Daily  Bruin  Arts  &  Entertainment 


\frs.  Parker  and  the  Vicious 
Circle  (New  Line)  Alan 
Rudolph's  biopic  had  all  the  trap- 
pings of  a  major  art-house  hit: 
Acclaimed  actors,  esoteric  subject 
matter  and  a  meandering  story 
with  no  momentum  to  be  found. 
JjPnnifer  Jason  Leigh  certainly  fit 
the  bill  of  the  hysterical  wise- 
cracking sufferer,  but  this  picture 


is  hard  to  penetrate  due  to  Leigh's 
too-good  monotone  delivery, 
already  redubbed  once  to  help 
straining  ears.  The  seemingly 
endless  cascade  of  figures 
(Matthew  Broderick,  Campbell 
Scott,  Peter  Gallagher,  Stephen 
Baldwin,  Andrew  McCarthy,  Lili 
Taylor  and  more)  that  parade  by 
the  Algonquin  round  table  are 
always  convincing,  sometimes 
amusing,  but  never  gripping.  We 
never  really  feel  Mrs.  Parker's 
losses  and  torment  because  she's 
perpetually  drowning  in  sorrow. 

The  strength  of  the  film  thus 
becomes  the  round  table 
sequences,  where  a  collection  of 
New  York's  literary  finest  hash 
put  the  events  of  the  day.  The  con- 
stant intelligent  quips  rise  above 
the  din  of  the  film  and  show  you 
the  atmosphere  that  probably 


drew  alj,  these  talents  to  the  pro- 
ject in  the  first  place.  Grab  your 
remote  and  prepare  to  backtrack 
for  Parker's  comments  and  the 
barbs  of  others,  for  they're  the 
best  and  brightest  moments  of  a 
film  that  does  all  the  emotional 
work  without  you.  M.H.    B+ 

Bullets  Over  Broadway 
(Miramax)  Woody  Allen's  latest 
is  a  heartfelt,  ribald  Broadway 
farce,  focused  on  keeping  you 
laughing  while  it  makes  its  small 
artistic  observations.  The  story  is 
strong,  the  direction  stellar,  but 
what  makes  Hulleis  buzz  are  the 
performances.  John  Cusack, 
decent  but  never  more  than  a 
Woody  impersonator,  is  a  strug- 
gling playwright,  who  endures 
with  a  cast  full  of  eccentrics  and 
compromises  to  bring  hi.s.  vision 


to  the  stage.  Dianne  Wiest  is  noth- 
ing short  of  brilliant  in  her  Oscar- 
winning  performance,  Chazz 
Palminteri  is,  as  usual,  superb  and 
Jennifer  Tilly  delivers  again  as 
Cusack's  source  of  terror.  As  the 
play's  run  continues,  it  becomes 
less  and  less  the  creation  of 
Cusack's  character  and  more  an 
amalgamation  of  its  cast  mem- 
bers. That  is  until  Palminteri's 
gangster  rewrites  the  entire  thing. 
Despite  slow-going  in  the  first 
half.  Bullets  is  full  of  laughs  and 
lines  you'll  be  uttering  long  after 
you  rewind  the  video.  It  ends  up 
questioning  artistry  itself,  but 
never  leaving  a  doubt  in  viewers* 
minds  that  Allen  is  st,ill  a  genius. 
M.H.   A- 

The  Shawshank  Redemption 
(Columbia)  Stephen  King's  short 
story  is  fleshed  out  here  perfectly 
by  Frank  Darabont,  who  follows 
his  heart  to  make  studiodom's 
best  film  of  the  year.  Tim 
Robbins,  sharp  as  always,  is  Andy 


Defresne.  a  banker  who's  been 
convicted  of  murder  and  sent  to 
prison.  There*  he  meets  Red 
(Morgan  Freeman),  a  convict 
notorious  for  smuggling  contra- 
band into  the  walls.  Perhaps  the 
greatest  skill  of  Shawshank  is  its 
ability  to  rise  above  the  pitfalls  of 
its  premise.  The  prison  scenes  are 
never  claustrophobic.  The  relent- 
less narration  never  becomes  tire- 
some. The  constant  focus  on  their 
friendship  only  becomes  more 
intriguing.  And  the  well-devel- 
oped close  goes  off  without  a 
hitch.  Shawshank  isn't  as 
provocative  as  Pulp  Fiction,  as 
intellectual  as  Quiz  Show,  as 
romantic  as  Four  Weddings  or  as 
ambitious  as  Forrest  Gump,  but  it 
has  more  emotional  resonance 
than  all  four.  It  moves  hearts, 
uplifts  spirits  and  soars  from  the 
confines  of  prison  walls.  M.H. 
A 

Reviews  by  Mike  Horowitz.  Video 
Clips  runs  every  Tuesday. 


Ed  Wood 

(Touchstone) 

A 

Forrest  Gump 

(Paramount) 

A 

Hoop  Dreams 

(New  Line) 

A 

Natural  Born  Kilters 

(Warner  Bros.) 

A 

Wedding  Banquet 

(Samuel  Goldwyn) 

A- 

Killing  Zoe 

(Live) 

B 

Jungle  Book 

(Disney) 

8- 

Lion  King 

(Disney) 

C-i- 

StarGate 

(MGM) 

C 

Color  of  Night 

(Hollywood) 

D* 

S.F.W. 

(Polygram) 

F 

SPONSORED  BY 


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Full  Houaa  Michelle 
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Frontline  "The 
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Home 
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Wish  Upon 
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Dateline  (In  Stereo)  X 
(In  Stereo)  K 


Blood  A  Belonging  (R) 


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Real  News' 
0  J.  Tonight 


Primer  Impado:  Edicion 
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Gunsmoka  "Rope  Fever" 


NewsX 


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actor  Mel  Gibson  X 


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#♦♦'.  "The  Soris  ol  Kalie  EWer"(1%5.  Western)  John  Wayne.  Dean 
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World  News 


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Inside 
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Kids  in  ttte 
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Prime  Time  Public  Affairs 


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Treaaure 
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Las  Miaarables 

Stage(R) 


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Terra  X  (R) 


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Pro  Beach  Volleyball 

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♦  ♦  "UrKOOQuerec/"  (1989)  Peter  Covole  Richmond 
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entertainment  shorts  (Ft) 
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Newhart 


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Pro  Beach  Volleyball  AVP  From  Dallas  (R) 


♦  ♦»'>  "Sudi0lenV"(l954,  Suspense)  Frank 

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the  Circle"  'X 


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but  Love  k: 


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♦  «'/,  "PteKOi/Ty"  (1969,  Drama)  Michael  Came  Exconvicis  cross 
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***  "Westward Ihe  Women  (1951,  Western)  Robert  Taylor,  Denise 
Darcel  Women  go  to  the  West  lo  meet  mail-order  mates  Cotorized. 

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Slereo)  X     [Stereo)  X      X 


***  "A  Man  Called  Horse"  {WO.  Adventure)  Richard  Hams,  Judith 
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(4  30)  ♦•'',  "The  Seventh 
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World  War  H:  A  Personal 

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♦  »♦♦  "'flen-Hur" (1959,  Adventure)  Charlton  Hetlon  Friendt 
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*♦  "On  Deadly  Ground" 
(1994)  Steven  Seagal  'R' 


♦  "Intimate  Obtestion"  (1992,  Adult) 
Jodie  Fithar.  James  Quarter  'R' 


Scott  A 
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Horror)  Tony  Todd  (In  Stereo)  R' 


Daily  Bruin  Arts  &  Entertainment 


Tuesday,  May  23, 1995    19 


Explosive  storytelling  gives  ammunition  to  'Wars' 


By  Jennifer  Richmond 

Daily  Bruin  Senior  Staff 

With  the  Gulf  War  just  a  few 
years  ago,  and  the  recent  bombing 
in  Oklahoma,  it  seems  rather  iron- 
ic  that  Vince 
Mc  Ke w  i  n  '  s 
"explosive 
comedy"  cen- 
ters around  an 
advert  i  s  i  n  g 
agency  that's 
trying  to  come 
up  with  a  way 
to  market  the 
bomb. 

But  just 
because  these  current  events  are 
upsettirtg  doesn't  mean  that 
McKewin's  "Ad  Wars"  isn't  one 
of  the  funniest  comedies  out  there 
to  date. 

The  Gulf  War  has  just  ended 
and  Dick  Hurly  (David  Dukes)  is 
expecting  a  new  client  later  in  the 
day.  So,  for  the  next  hour  or  two, 
he  and  his  staff  have  to  come  up 
with  a  slogan  and  an  ad  campaign 
that  will  blow  away  the  competi- 
tion. 

It  won't  be  easy.  Especially 
when  the  one  person  he's  count- 
ing on  to  push  this  deal  through  is 
Patrick  Boyle  (Tim  Ryan),  a 
young  man  who  served  in  the  war 
and  wants  nothing  more  to  do 
with  bombs,  guns  or  any  old-time 
war  stories.  But  with  his  wife  try- 


ing  to  fmd  a  new  house  and  both 
attempting  to  live  on  a  tight  bud- 
get, Boyle  may  have  no  choice. 

This  is  where  McKewin  knocks 
'em  dead.  While  on  the  surface 
his  story  is  all  about  the  advertis- 
ing business,  it  becomes  more  and 
more  obvious  "Wars"  is  about 
who  has  the  most  power.  Is  it 
Dick  Hurly  or  the  two  oth§r  vice 
presidents,  Jill  Koenig  (Stephanie 
Zimbalist)  and  Fred  Iwanoski  (the 
blunt  voice  of  Danny  Goldman)? 

McKewin  paints  his  power  play 
pretty  clearly.         :^ 

At  first  it  seems  like  Dick's  in 
charge.  He's  a  shoe-in  for  the 
presidency  and  he  drinks  Maalox 
straight  from  the  bottle  whenever 
something  goes  wrong.  He's  your 
typi«il  top-rung  suit  whose  main 
interest  is  power  and  pushing  this 
deal  through.  He  doesn't  want  to 
hear  about  his  workers'  problems 
and  he'll  do  anything  necessary  to 
make  the  client  happy,  including 
letting  him  help  with  the  cam- 
paign. 

But  nothing  ever  goes  as 
planned  and  every  suit  has  his 
right-  and  left-hand  men  to  clear 
things  up.  McKewi^  gives  Hurly 
his  assistants  in  the  very  uptight 
and  bitchy  media  director,  Jill, 
and  in  the  crude  market 
researcher,  Fred.  With  a  three- 
some like  this,  you  know  it's 
going  to  be  nonstop  fireworks. 
And  McKewin  doesn't  disappoint. 


Jill's  pissed  becau.se  she  has  to 
cancel  a  lunch  date  with  a  very 
important  client  and  Fred  won't 
sit  in  on  the  meeting  because  he 
can't  stand  looking  at  Dick.  These 
two  hate  Dick  with  a  passion  and 
control  every  move  he  makes. 
Dick  hates  them  just  asrthuch,  but 
really  can't  do  anything  without 
them. 

McKewin  knows  just  how  to 
write  this  type  of  situation:  Just 
enough  bickering  to  make  Jill  and 
Fred  seem  like  competent  people 
wlio  can^t  be^pushe^^rduhff,  biit 
enough  sense  to  know  how  to 
manipulate  him.  And  boy  do  they 
know  how  to  manipulate. 

While  Dick  is  at  lunch,  Jill  and 
Fred  give  Patrick  a  lesson  in 
power.  Dick  wants  Patrick  on  this 
project  so  badly  he's  practically 
willing  to  do  anything  Patrick 
wants  -  and  Patrick  wants  a  very 
expensive  house  in  Brooklyn 
Heights  and  the  $50,000  down 
payment.  So,  Jill  and  Fred  tell  an 
objecting  Patrick  how  to  get  it. 

McKewin  writes  the  classic 
teacher-student  relationship, 
adding  just  a  hint  of  sarcasm  and 
the  perfect  amount  of.scandal. 
The  situation  becomes  a  deli- 
ciously  intense  scene  of  "will  he" 
or  "won't  he"  and  gives  McKewin 
the  chance  to  write  about  obvious 
corruption  without  giving  the 
audience  a  lesson  in  its  draw- 
backs. It's  an  ideal  scene  that  is 


David  Dukes  and  Stephanie  2imbalist  star  in  "Ad  Wars. 

only  improved  upon  by  the  play's 
final  minutes  when  everything 
comes  to  a  head. 

McKewin's  knack  f^or  layering 
subtext  on  top  of  subtext  and  sto- 
ryline on  top  of  storyline  is  fan- 
tastic. It  may  be  hard  to  believe 
that  there's  more  than  one  pitch 
going  on,  but  it's  never  hard  to 
follow.  This  is  the  mark  of  a  great 
writer.  McKewin  lakes  care  to 
reveal  certain  aspects  only  when 
necessary.  He  never  gives  away 
too  much,  but  he  never  keeps  his 
objectives  hidden  either.  He's  got 


the  perfect  mixture;  making  this 
comedy  as  explosive  as  its  prod- 
uct. 

STAGE:  "Ad  Wars."  Written  by 
Vince  McKewin.  Directed  by  Jenny 
Sullivan.  Starring. David  Dukes, 
Stephanie  Zimbalist  and  Tim 
Ryan.  Running  through  May  28  at 
the  Court  Theater.  Performs 
Thursday  through  Saturday  at  8 
p.m.  and  Sundays  at  2  p.m.  and"? 
p.m.  It  moves  to  the  Tiffany 
Theater  June  2.  TIX:  $20.  $15  with 
a  valid  student  ID, For  more  info 
call  (213)  466-1767. 


MANN 

MANN 

LAEMMLE 

GENERAL 

1 

LANDMARK 

Westwood 


Santa  Monica 


West  Hollywood 


Westwood 


West  L.A. 


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Frame  Up 

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(11 


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Caafar  (P6):  Sal  7  30.  Sun  5  00 
d(R):  12  15-2  30-5  00-7  30^9  45 


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The  Secret  ol  Roan  Inish 

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MONICA  I 
1322  2nd  Street 
394-9741 


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il't  W(Mlii|  (R) 

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ijMaMMartolPB-13) 

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ROYAL 

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From  Hollywood  to  Haaol:  (5  40) 


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730945 

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(3.005:15) 


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274-6869 


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CRITERION  1  M*  Family.  Ml  Famllla  |R) 

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CRITERION  2 

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CfirTERIORI 

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Weekend  Program* 

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ot  tbe  FMaa  GallMaa 

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Sat/Sun  1 1  TO  am 

Mailfca  and  I 

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12  30-3  0O-5  30-8  TO  10  30  (♦  Fri/Sat  12  TO) 
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Dolby  Bad  Boyi  (R) 

1 1:30-2  15-5  00-7  45-10  30  (♦  Fri/Sal  12  TO) 


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OouWe  Feature  Circle  ol  Friend*  (P6-1S) 

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1314  WiKhire  Blvd   4  30-7  00-9  40  («  Fri/Sal  Midnight) 
394  8099        Sal/Sun/Wed  11  30-200-4  30  7  TO  940 


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UA  WESTWOOD  Tbe  Enallebman  Wbo  Went  Up 

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12  45-3  l()-5  40-8  10- 10  40 

Forget  Part*  (PG  13) 
11  45  2  fO-4  40  7  10  9  40 


West  L.A. 


UCH.A 


NUART  RabalWNbaalACaaaa 

1 1272  StnU  Monica   5  30  8  TO  (>  Sat/Son  12  30-300) 

478-6379  Olaak  6amber   FrMay  MtdnIgM 

Raafey  Horror    Saturday  MMnIgM 

VM  MaalaaM  at  httpy/www.movienet  com/moytanet 


Camyas  Evoati  LafaMi  al  Ma  FaM 

Ackerman  Granfl  Ballroom  Wed/Thart/Fn  O  4  30  9  45 
825  1958  TMma  A  laelta 

$2 par  mgfM  Wed/TTwri/Fn  O  7  30 

CEfiNit  httpy/*a(v*r2  taaa.BcU  a6ii/  laifaw/cac.html 


20    Tuesday,  May  23, 1995 


Daily  Bruin  Arts  &  Entertainment 


ORPER   yOOR  YEARPOOSr   NOW 

-TO     ORDER,     CALt  * 


^■lP..;5i#*«^    ;  :W^.>m^    m 


OR     3TOR    FV    XNE     OFBCE 
A-fS    2aS     KTERCkTMOFI? 


The  UCLA  Center  for  the  Performing  Arts  ancL 


the  UCLA  Student  Committee  for  the  Arts  present 


The  Russian  Village  Folk  Celebration 


Tuesday,  May  23,  3:00  PM 
Fowler  Amphitheater 
Free  Admission 


"■,•<! 


For  information, 
Call  206-7408 


Spjanning  three  generations,  these  renowned  Russian  ensembles  vA/ill  display  the  diversity  of  their 
viHage  communities,  performing  traditional  songs  and  dances  as  they  represent  their  distinct  living 
cultures. 

Babushkas  from  CherenOVO:  An  ensemble  of  four  elderly  women  from 
the  Northern  Arkhangelsk  region.  Dressed  in  red  ptaid  jumpers  and  birchbark  slippers,  these 
grandmothers  sing  soulful  courtship  and  wedding  songs.  The  Babushkas  suggest  the  prominent 
role  of  Russian  women  in  the  transmission  of  culture  from  generation  to  generation. 

Old  BollOV^rSS  Exiled  to  Siberia  in  the  17th  century  for  refusing  to  accept  Russian 
Ortnbfioxy's  reforms,  this  mixed  male  arxl  female  chorus  sings  harmonic  compositions  of  a  spiritual 
nature 

RadoveS  from  Voronezh:  Demonstrating  the  continuity  of  a  living 
tradition,  the  Voronezh  group  of  young  mimes  and  dancers  learned  the  songs  and  dances  of  their 
region  as  done  by  their  ancestors. 


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Bad  plot,  characters 
ruin  'Honeymooners' 


Sexual  references, 
treatment  of  rape 
slowdown  show 

By  Jeana  Blackman 

The  best  thing  about  "The 
Honeymooners"  happens  the 
moment  you  walk  in.  The  space 
is  intimate  with  only  about  15 
seats  and  you're  2  feet  from  the 
playing  area.  Seemingly  a  nice 
place  to  see  a 
show  ...  that 
is,  until  the 
actors  walk  in 
and  begin  to 
speak. 

The  ill-fated 
play  by  Angelo' 
^Michael 
Masino  starts 
off  pretty 
poorly  but  gets 
worse,  much 

worse.  Essentially  it's  about  how 
a  woman  gets  raped  and  her 
newly  wedded  husband  blames 
her,  its  moral  message  being  that 
men  should  be  supportive  and 
rape  is  not  the  woman's  fault. 

Instead  of  truly  examining  the 
complicated  issue  of  rape  and  all 
of  the  emotions  it  raises,  Masino 
chooses  to  manipulate  every 
stereotype  and  makes  a  mockery 
^  the  entire  ordeal. 

First  there  are  the  two  men 
from  Brooklyn  on  the  tower  side 
of  life  -  complete  with  gambling 
and  drinking  problems  plus  con- 
nections with  the  local  mob.  As 
if  every  low  life  in  Brooklyn  is 
associated  with  a  mob  boss 
named  Tony. 

Joey  is  the  new  husband  and 
he's  played  by  Masino.  who  also 
directs  the  play.  Somebody  stop 
him.  His  Brooklyn  accent  is  real 
enough,  probably  since  he's  from 
there,  but  other  than  that  there's 
nothing  to  his  performance.  He 
struts  aroundvthe  stage  occasion- 
ally baring  his  chest,  recking  of 
machismo.  Unfortunately  he  is 
so  cartoonish  it's  impossible  to 
lake  him  at  all  seriously. 

His  pal  Jake  (Jo.seph  T.  Zito)  is 
really  no  better,  but  since  he  is 
more  of  a  supporting  character 
it's  slightly  forgivable.  Near  the 
end,  he  actually  has  a  few  amus- 
ing lines,  but  mainly  he's  just  a 
fellow  brute.  Their  scenes 
together  are  more  reminiscent  of 
"Married...  with  Children"  than 
anything  believable. 


Instead  of  truly  examin- 
ing the  complicated 
issue  of  rape  ...  Masino 
chooses  to  manipulate 
every  stereotype  and 
makes  a  mockery  of  the 
entire  ordeal. 


To  her  credit.  Lambert  gives 
the  most  credible  performance 
and  the  few  scenes  that  are 
decent  involve  her.  But  even -she 
can't  overcome  poor  dialogue, 
poor  script  and  poor  acting  on 
everyone  else's  part. 

From  the  beginning  it's  diffi- 
cult to  comprehend  why  Linda 
and  Joey  are  together  in  the  first 
place.  Their  first  scene  together  . 
is  their  wedding  night  and  they 
fight  within  two  minutes  of  the 
start  of  the  scene.  Joey  is  spout- 
ing his  male  dogma  about  how 
his  wife  isn't  going  to  work,  blah 
blah  blah,  and  Linda's  response 
is  equally  energetic.  He  stomps 
out. 

Then  Linda  goes  on  her  hon- 
eymoon alone  and  gets  raped. 
She  comes  back  to  an  unsympa- 
thetic Joey.  He  leaves  and  she's 
alone  with  Lisa.  What's  going  to 
happen  next?  Who  cares? 

This  play  just  drags  so  slowly, 
the  minute  hand  on  your  watch 
will  seem  to  freeze.  There  are  a 
few  jokes,  or  at  least  lines  that 
are  supposed  to  funny,  but  they 
elicit  barely  a  murmur. 

Technically  the  show  is  pass- 
able, except  for  the  horrible 
sound  design.  Music  plays  at  odd 
times  and  doesn't  seem  to  fit  the 
mood  of  any  given  situation  - 
not  that  there  are  any  strong 


The  girls  dort't  escape  the 
stereotypes  either.  The  wife. 
Linda  (Christine  McQuade),  is  a 
struggling  actress  who  gets  raped 
by  a  seedy  producer.  Then  after 
she  gets  raped,  she  temporarily 
becomes  a  lesbian  with  her 
friend  Lisa  (Kathleen  Lambert). 

Lisa,  by  the  way,  is  a  waitress 
for  the  mob  boss  that  Jake  and 
Joey  are  involved  with  and  she 
has  to  do  sexual  favors  for  his 
clients.  She  is  also  a  wanna-be 
actress  that  has  dreams  of  open- 
ing her  own  flower  shop. 


("The  Honeymooners") 
reveals  nothing  but  a 
contrived  plot ...  and 
pathetic,  moronic 
attempts  to  either 
shock  or  humor  with 
sick  sexual  references. 


moods  anyway.  There's  no  name 
given  for  sound  designer,  but 
with  phone  messages  that  are 
inaudible  and  sound  that  is  com- 
pletely inappropriate  it's  no  won- 
der the  person  remains 
anonymous. 

The  ending  is  perhaps  the 
worst  offense  of  all.  Linda  is 
about  to  leave  with  Lisa  to  go 
visit  her  father's  grave  in  New 
Mexico  as  a  way  of  getting  oyer 
the  rape.  Joey  sheepishly  begs 
forgiveness  for  his  earlier  behav- 
ior but  Linda  is  not  receptive. 
That  is  until  he  says  as  he  walks 
out  the  door,  "I  will  always  care 
about  you".  Suddenly  they're 
going  to  her  father's  grave 
together.  Pretty  cheesy  and 
melodramatic. 

Then  the  final  scene.  Don't 
worry  there's  no  surprise.  Linda 
and  Joey  come  back  ready  to  live 
happily  ever  after.  Meanwhile 
Lisa  and  Jake  have  slept  together 
and  now  he's  going  to  help  her 
with  that  flower  shop  she's 
always  dreamed  of. 

From  beginning  to  end  this 
play  reveals  nothing  but  a  con- 
trived plot,  stereotypical  charac- 
ters and  pathetic,  moronic 
attempts  to  either  shock  or 
humor  with  sick  sex  references. 
Don't  see  this  play  unless  your 
life  depends  on  it.  Even  then,  it 
might  not  be  worth  it. 

THEATER:  "The  Honeymooners" 
by  Angelo  Michael  Masino  play- 
ing at  Theatre/Theatre  at  17134 
Cahuenga  Blvd.  in  Hollywood. 
RUNS:  Friday  and  Saturday  at  8 
p.m.  and  Sunday  at  7  p.m. 
through  June  18.  TIX:  $10  gener- 
al. For  more  info  and/or  reserva- 
Jjon8Gfill(213)550:-6941^ 


Daily  Bruin  Arts  &  Entertalimieiit 


TusMlay,  May  23, 1995    21 


FOLEY 


From  page  17 

he  told  the  audience  he  had  just 
come  back  from  an  archeological 
dig  where  he  had  discovered 
something  shocking. 

Foley's  character  had  learned 
that  Jesus  Christ  was  a  very  bad 
carpenter.  Foley's  proof  from  the 
expedition  included  a  three-legged 
table  and  a  misshapen  hunk  of 
wood  they  thought  was  a  spice 
rack. 

"So  it  was\  I  thought,  pretty 
innocuous."  Foley  says.  "Except 
in  the  last  line  -  which  I  thought 
was  a  good  joke  -  T ~s a i37 
'Although  Christ  may  have  been  a 
great  prophet  and  possibly  the  son 
of  God  it  seems  pretty  obvious 
that  as  a  carpenter  he  was  not  even 
capable  enough  to  construct  the 
cross  on  which  he  met  his  martyr- 
dom.' 

"And  just  because  of  that  one 
line  it  was  banned  -  I  think  it  actu- 
ally got  cut  from  the  HBO  version 
too." 

Even  the  Kids'  censored  materi- 
al caused  a  lot  of  angry  letters.  To 
Foley,  it  was  more  the  network's 
job  to  take  care  of  those.  The 
response  to  one  skit,  however, 
caused  him  to  write  back. 

"There  was  only  one  time  that  I 
really  wanted  to  explain  to  some 
people  that  we  weren't  trying  to 


"Tliere  was  ...  one  time 

that  I  really  wanted  to 

explain  to  some  people 

-t4^at  we  weren't  trying 

to  be  hurtful." 
David  Foley. 

Comedian 


be  hurtful."    

That  controversial  skit  was 
called  "The  cause  of  cancer."  In  it. 
Foley  outed  another  Kids'  mem- 
ber, Bruce  McCulloch.  as  the 
actual  cause  of  cancer. 

"Some  people  wrongly  inter- 
preted that  we  were  making  fun  of 
cancer.  I  actually  sent  a  letter  to 
someone  who  wax  very,  very  hurt, 
who  had  lost  someone  to  cancer. 

"Back  then  cancer  was  like  the 
boogie  man,  it  was  the  scariest 
thought  you  could  have:  And  that 
skit  was  just  trying  to  alleviate 
that  tension  a  little. 

"At  the  time  we  did  that  piece  a 
very  close  friend  of  ours  was 
dying  of  cancer  and  she  quite 
liked  the  piece." 

Foley's  role  on  the  prime  time 
comedy,  "Newsradio,"  however, 
has  not  caused  any  of  the  same 
problems. 

"It's  not  like  'Newsradio'  is 
looking  to  be  shocking  or  any- 
thing, we  really  are  doing  a 
straight  ahead  comedy  show," 
Foley  says.  "We  haven't  run  into 
anything  where  we've  said  this  is 
what  we  want  to  do  and  the  cen- 
sors said  we  couldn't  do  it. 

"Of  course  we're  all  realistic 
about  what  kind  of  language  we 
can  use.  It's  not  like  we're  being 
really  naive  and  saying,  'Ya  know 
...  wouldn't  it  be  nice  if  this  char- 
acter suddenly  said  "cunt".' 

"We're  working  within  the  con- 
strictions but  not  feeling  any  con- 
straints." 

Even  with  a  new  show,  Foley 
hasn't  changed  much.  The  come- 
dy may  be  different,  but  his  beliefs 
remain  the  same. 

"Coffee's  always  a  good  thing. 
That's  my  message  to  the  youth, 
the  kids  out  there,  the  children  lis- 
tening -  that  coffee  is  always  a 
good  thing." 

TELEVISION:  "Newsradio"  returns 
this  fall  on  NBC.  It  airs  Tuesdays  at 
8:30  p.m. 


Luscious  Jackson  spurs  Palace  pep  rally 


By  Kristin  Flore 

The  members  of  Luscious 
Jackson  look  as  though  they 
belong  on  a  Wheaties  box,  not  a 
rock  stage. 

And  while  appearances  can 
deceive.  Luscious  ladies  Viv,  Jill. 
'  Kate  and  Gabby 
do  nothing  of 
the  sort.  Their 
music  and  man- 
ner are  as  down 
to  earth  as  their 
appearance, 
which  their  new 
album  title, 
Natural 
Ingredients, 
suggests. 

But  the  girls-next-door  schtick 
stops  short  of  the  music,  which  is 
an  eclectic  mix  of  everything  but 
the  ordinary.  Funk,  disco,  dance, 
moody  chords  and  keyboard 
effects  intertwine  and  recall  the 
motley  sound  sculptures  of  Beck, 
as  well  as  his  laid-back  delivery. 

Though  praised  by  the  young 
KROQ  crowd,  Luscious  Jackson 
look  the  Palace  stage  last  Tuesday 
night  prepared  to  break  band-audi- 


ence barriers,  not  guitars  and  amps. 

The  band  immediately  broke  out 
its  better  songs  and  tumed  the  the- 
atre into  a  pep  rally  by  demanding 
any  crowd's  favorite  contribution 
to  a  show  -  screaming  on  cue.  The 
audience's  shrill  cries  filled  out  the 
mostly  wordless  choruses  of  the 
band,  whose  lyrics,  or  lack  thereof, 
are  a  trademark. 

Instead  of  poetic  or  angry  mut- 
terings.  Lu.scious  Jackson  opts  for 
a  simple  "wooo"  to  get  the  point 
across  -  a  point  which  seems  to  be, 
"Ch^ill  and  4iave  a  good  time," 
which  it  did. 

Keyboardist  and  resident  chore- 
ographer Vivian  composed  tongue- 
in-cheek  Temptations-style  dance 
routines  that  all  four  members  per- 
formed. Such  antics  kept  the  show 
going  longer  than  the  music,  which 
began  to  slide  in  quality  and  diver- 
sity after  the  first  half  of  the  set. 

Vocalist  Jill  corrected  a  .security 
guard  when  he  tried  to  stop  a  fan 
from  taking  the  stage,  and  soon  it 
was  filled  with  eager  audience 
members.  Ordinarily,  this  may 
have  sparked  a  stage  diving  match 
or  some  other  gruesome  teenage 
stunt,  but  in  an  unusual  show  of 


maturity,  restraint  or  pure  lethargy, 
the  fans  refrained  from  moshing 
and  actually  listened  and  danced  to 
the  music. 

Luscious  Jackson's  mellower, 
hypnotic  sound  or  kick-back  per- 
formance style  may  be  what  Icept 
body  parts  moving  in  their  places 
and  not  over  others'  heads.  The 
show  seemed  more  of  a  get-togeth- 
er thae  a  raging  party,  which  fit  the 
tone  of  the  music  to  a  tee. 

At  times,  however,  the  band  per- 
formed too  little.  Aside  from  the 
lead  singer,  the  ladies  seemed  quiet 
and  not  sure  what  to  make  of  their 
role  as  performers.  They  didn't 
seem  to  work  toward  a  climax  dur- 
ing the  set.  and  as  a  result,  the 
crowd's  energy  began  to  lag  toward 
the  end  of  the  show. 

However,  their  unpretentious 
style  is  better  than  an  overblovt.'n 
extravaganza  of  false  energy  and 
emotion,  and  it  leaves  you  with  a 
^nse  of  who  the  girls  really  are. 

Though  the  main  set  ended  with- 
out a  bang,  the  encore  brought 
back  the  wild  opening  act, 
Lunachicks,  for  a  final  spin  on  the 
stage-turned-dance-floor  with 
Luscious  Jackson. 


IfXuscious  Jackson  is  The 
Breakfast  Club,  the  members 
ofLunachicks  a:re  definitely 
straight  out  of  the  Rocky  Horror 
Picture  Show.  Complete  with  tat- 
toos, tutus,  tinsel  and  plenty  of 
kitsch  attitude,  Lunachicks  live  up 
to  their  name. 

Their  rowdy  opening  act  was 
reminiscent  of  the  Cramps  or  the 
Waitresses,  with  seductive  teasing, 
vulgarity  and  energy  to  spare 
(move  over  Courtney  Love). 

The  l-unachicks'  outlandish  cos- 
tumes, stage^ntics  and  power^ 
chord  driven  songs  are  a  stark  con- 
trast to  Luscioas  Jackson's  no-non- 
sense style  and  mellowguitar, 
filled  with  unusual  sixth  and  sev- 
enth chords  and  techniques. 

The  two  bands  danced  together 
onstage  during  the  encore, 
Lunachicks'  guitarist  like  a 


whirling  dervish  and  Luscious 
Jack.son's  drummer  like  a  chaperon 
at  a  high  school  dance.  Their 
shows  were  almost  photo  negatives 
of  each  other,  but  it  was  clear  they 
shared  a  similar  desire  to  entertain 
and  stretch  the  boundaries  of  the 
norm  without  taking  themselves 
too  seriously. 


eatscor^. 


(^ 


<^(i^ 


(^ 


Kaplan  helps  you  focus 
your  test  prep  study 
where  you  need  it  most. 
We'll  show  you  the 
proven  skills  and  test- 
taking  techniques  that 
help  you  get  a  higher 
score. 


great  skills... 


Kaplan  has  the  most  complete  arsenal  of  test  prep  tools  available.  From 
videos  to  software  to  virtual  reality  practice  tests  with  computerized  analysis 
to  great  teachers  who  really  care,  nobody  offers  you  more  ways  to  practice. 

1-800-KAP-TEST 

get  a  higher  score 


22    TuM^y,  May  23, 1995 


Dally  Bruin  Classified 


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race,  rekgion.  sex.  or  stnial  ortMMlon  In  I  damenlng  way  or  irnply  that  they  are  lirnHed  to 
poslikm.  capabilities,  rotes  or  iMus  in  society.  NaUlMr  the  Daily  Brum  nor  the  ASUCIA 
Communicatkm  Board  has  inrnUgalMi  aiiy  of  the  saivhMs  advertised  or  the  advertisers 
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90024.  For  assisUnce  with  housing  dtscnmination  problems,  call  the  UCLA  Housing  Offfce  at 
(310)  825-4271  or  call  the  Westsidc  Fair  Housing  Offk:e  at  (310}  475-9671. 


1.  Start  your  ad  witfi  the  mercfiandise  your  are  selling.  This  makes  it  easier  for  readers  to  quickly  scan 
the  ads  and- locate  your  item(s). 

2.  Always  include  the  price  of  the  item  you  are  selling.  Many  classified  readers  simply  do  not  respond 

to  ads  without  prices. '  s 


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How  to  write  a  good  ad 

3.  Avoid  abbreviations  --  make  your  ad  easy  for  readers  to  understand. 

4.  Place  yourself  in  the  reader's  position.  Ask  what  you'd  like  to  know  about  the  merchandise, 


and  include  that  in  the  ad.  Include  information  such  as  brand  names,  colors,  and  other  specific 
descriptions.  _^__^^_^^___^__^^^___ 


Campus  Happenings 


Alcoholics  Anonymous 

Mon.  Discussion,  Fri.  Step  Study,  AU  3625 

Thurs.  Book  Study.  AU  3525 
Tuos.  and  Wed  DiscuMion.  Dental  A-3-029 

All  times  I2;10-l;00pm 

For  alcoholics  or  Individuals  who  have  a 

drinking  problem. 


4  Financial  Aid 


Cash  for  college.  900,000  grants  available. 
No  repayrrwnU,  EVER.  Qualify  immediately. 

1-800-243-2435. 

COLLEGE  MONEY  CUARANTEEDI  IOC's  of 
millions  in  scholarships,  grants,  aid  &  private 
funds.  Be  smart,  apply  domt.  1  -800-549-2400 
ext«9101. 


7  Good  Deals 


GRADUATION  ANNOUNCEMENTS  AND 
INVITATIOI^  much  cheaper  than  UClA's 
prices...Per»ooalized,  25  for  $32.80,  100  for 
$45.90.  Large  selectior^,  rush  orders  wel' 
come.  Elegant  Invitalions.  310-652-6550. 
INSURANCE  WARI  WE'LL  BEAT  ANYONES 
price  or  dor^'t  want  your  business.  Ticltets, 
accidents,  student/staff  discounts.  Request 
Jhe  'Bruin  Plan.'  3 1 0-  777-881  7  or  21 3-873- 
3303. 


THIS  WEEK  amy ! 


ALL  books  in  stock: 

Economics.  Business, 

General  Hea  th  and 

Nutrition 


3  0  01 , 


Zorfi 


■  I  lll4IHllllll.il  I 

A  Level  Aci«erman  Umon  •  ?06  4041 


9  Miscellaneous 


ALPHA  DELTA  CHI 

Is  recruiting  Christian  women  for  sorority 
membership.  If  interested,  call  Tracy,  310- 
320-4930  orCheryll,  310-4712275. 

JOHN  LENNON 

A  philosophical  er>quiry  into  his  life,  work, 
arvJ  influerKe.  9-weel(  course  commencing 
V9/B5.  Kinko's  conference  room,  Torrar>ce. 
310378-0536. 


10  Personal 


••THE  DAILY  BRUIN  ASSUMES  NO  RE- 
SPONSIBILITY FOR  ADVERTISERS'  OR 
CUSTOMERS'  EXPERIENaS  CONCERNING 

ADS  IN  THE  PERSONALS  SECTION. 

HEALTHY  ALTERNATIVE  TO  BAR  SCENE. 
Browse  through  perspective  datesi  1-900- 
562  7000  ext.  6739.  $2.99/min..  Must  be 
1»Yfi.   ProcallCo.    602-954-7420. 

OJ  SIMPSON!!! 

Guilty  or  innocent?  Voice  your  ov<m  opinion 
America.  Call...1 -900-945-9600  Ext-117. 
$1.9^mir>/184-  only,  touchtones  only.  Infb- 
service,  Studio  City,  CA.  21 3-993-3366. 

WITNESSES 

BUS  ACCIDENT  VICTIM  seeks  witnesses. 
1C^24/94,  3pm,  at  Hilgard/Leconte.  54-yr-old 
Asian  woman,  wearir>g  green  coat,  fell.  In- 
jured herself  on  Bus  21 .  If  you  have  ar^y  info, 
please  call  Yinfc  21  3-735-4422. 

VVNTED:  100  PEOPLE 

Lose  10-29  lbs.  in  30  days  and  earn  SSS  do- 
inn  it  100%  Kuarantee.  Call  31 0-281  -8828. 


12  Research  Subjects 


BEDWETTfNG  BOYS  7-11  yr«.  and  their  fa- 
milies rweded  for  UCLA  research  project 
Subjects  will  receive  $20  and  a  free  develop- 
mental evaluation.  31 0-B25  0392. 

COUPLES  NEEDED 

Research  on  personality,  compatability.  Free 
phone  consultation  offered  regarding  dynam- 
ics of  relilionihip  based  on  test  results.  Geri, 
310-281-6533. 


12  Research  Subjects 


12  Research  Subjects 


12  Research  Subjects 


NERVOCIS?  ANXIOaS? 
FEARFUL?  WORRIED? 

Research  volunteers  between  the  ages  of  18  and  65 

experiencing  these  symptoms  for  at  least  1  month  and 

in  relatively  good  liealth  are  needed.  Volunteers  will 

receive  a  brief  exam  in  order  to  determine  eligibility. 

Qualified  volunteers  receive  free  basic  physical 

exam/lab  test  and  compensation  up  to  $495.^^. 


California!  CLINICAL  TRiALSl 


MEDICAL  GROUP 

Please  call  1-800-854-3902 


CALIFORNIA 


PLEASE      CALL 


Feeling  depressed,  sad  or  hopeless?  Lost 

interest  or  energy? 
Sleeping  too  much 
or  too  little?  Crying 
frequently? 
Participants  18  to  65 

needed  for  medical  research  study. 

Quatified  volunteers  may  be  comp>ensated 

up  to  $660. 

1  -800-854-3902 


DEPRESSED?? 

AND  A  STUDENT  OVER  20  YEARS?  Earn 
$20  in  2-hour  study  on  relaliorvhip  between 
physiological  activity  and  inf^agery.  Call  lean, 
310^25-0252. 


VOLUNTEERS  NEEDED  FOR  cardiac  mag- 
netic resoruryx  imaging  research.  $1(]^  U 
hours  max.).  Call  310-824-6714  (rom  B»n- 
4pm  or  pa|«e  310-777-1 719«. 


HYPERACTIVE  BOYS  with  attcntional  prob-  ^ 
lerrvs  7-11    yrs,  needed   (or  UCIA   research 
project.  Receive  S20  and  a  free  developmerv- 
tal  evaluation.  310-825-0392. 

Liccrw:d  Psychotherapist  working  on  dodor- 
al-disMnallon  interested  in  irxilviduals  wtw 
experienced  childhood  k>use  and  neglect. 
Aduh-childrcn  of  alcoholics,  eating  disorders, 
vidinrts  of  irK:cst.  erKouraged  to  participate 
Free  consultation  arvl  evaluaflion.  Voiccmail 
3ia284-4a8V,  office  213-658-7213. 

NORMAL  HEALTHY  BOYS  7-11  yrs,  and 
their  families  needed  (or  LKZLA  research  pro- 
ject. Receive  $20  and  have  a  tcientiflc  learrv 
ing  experience.  310-825-0392. 

Psychology  Study 

Adult  children  of  psyc^wiogists,  psychiatrists, 
other  physicians,  health  professionals,  want- 
ed for  brief  study.  2S-)^ars>.  Compensation. 
Call  Mike,  81 8-9800450. 

SMOKERS  STUDY 

In  good  health,  18-55,  wanted  for  smoking 
cessation  using  (ood  supplements.  AJI  partio 
ipanU  rccchw  free  treatment  with  nicollne 
gum.  Call  310-824-6671. 


13  Rides  Offefed 


DRIVE  OUR  CAR 

from  LA  to  the  East  Coast.  One  to  New  Eng- 
land, one  to  D.C.  Early/Mid  June.  310-556- 
5648. 


15  Wanted 


GRAD  TiX 

Graduation  TickeU  Needed.  Social  SclerKies 
Ceremony  at  Pauley  on  VI 8.  Needed  for  kits 
of  relatives.  Willing  to  pay.  21 3-734-4568. 


16  Lost  and  Found 


FOUND,  ON  MAY  8TH,  Black  male  puppy 
w/d)llar  In  paridng  lot  14.  310-206-5657. 

FOUND.  Set  of  keys.  Found  near  Cayley  and 
Weybum  on  May  7,  1995.  Call  31&208- 
1865  to  claim. 


19  Sperm/Egg  donors 


ECC  DONORS  NEEDED,  age*  20-32.  lor  Irv 

fertile    couples.     Generous     compensation. 
Leave  name,  address,  telephone  r>umber  (or 
Information  and  application.  310-273-4827. 
ECC  DONORS  t^EDED.  All  info  confiden- 
tial. Please  call  31 0-28S^333. 


19  Sperm/Egg  Donors 


EGG  DONORS  NEEDED:  Healthy  females 
between  21-34years  old  w/medkal  Irv 
turance.  Paynr>ent  of  S2200  for  medical  pro- 
cess. MIrru  Navas  310-829-6782,  Monday- 
Friday. 

l^tcaae  help  Infertile  Japar>ese-American.  Will 
pay  nwdical  expenses  arxf  $2,500  to 
Japanese,  Korean,  or  Chinese  egg  dorwr. 
Grad  studenU  call  (21 3)765-5300.  Use  code 
BH.     

SPERM  DONORS  needed  for  ar>ortynrtous 
dorux  program  at  one  o(  the  largest  sperm 
banks  In  the  oiuntry,  earn  up  to  $42Q^no.  I( 
qualified.  Contact  Heidi  at  the  California 
Cryobank  310-443-S244.  ext  24. 


22  Health  Services 


ALONE-STRESSED-OVERWHELMED.  Sup- 
portive courweling.  Confidential.  Irxtividuals, 
couples,  groups.  Adjacent  to  can>pus.  Carole 
Chvin  MA,  MFCC.  310-289-4643. 


22  Health  Services 


BODY  SCULPTING 

3  TO  5  TIMES  BETTER  RESULTS  awr  other 
products  I  Great  tasting,  advanced  nutritional 
beverages.  Call  todayl  818-594-3358. 


DEPRESSION?  STRESS?  RaATIONSHIP 
PROBLEMS?  PARENTING  ISSUES?  Individu- 
al, couple,  family  therapy  for  adults,  adoles- 
cents, children.  1 9  years  clinical  expcricrKX. 
Accept  most  managed  care  and  IrwurarKse 
plarw.  Reasonable  rales.  Westwood  Villa§e. 
Steven  Cherman,  L.C3.W.  M.F.C.C.  310- 
837-9277. 

IMPROVE  MEMORY... 

mental  clarity,  physical  stamina,  digestion. 
May  control  stress,  anxiety,  PMS,  depression. 
All  natural,  organic.  30-day  guarantee. 
Call  1 -800-927-2S27X-2734. 

PSYCHOTHERAPY 

aiNICAL  PSYCHOLOGIST  (psy140e2) 
trained  at  UCLA  offers  time-limited  psycho- 
therapy focused  on  removing  blocks  to  aca- 
demic arfd  work  effidcrKy,  and  positive  rela- 
tionships, kieal  (or  students  arvJ  faculty  high- 
ly motivated  to  change.  Sliding  scale.  310- 
273-3864. 

SENSUAL  MASSAGE 

$20  SPECIAL  FOR  WOMEN  ONLY.  Relaxing 
full  body,  sensual  massage  by  Italian  man. 
Comfortable  atmosphere.  310-479-6434. 

STUDENT  RATES 

(Hychotherapy/counseling  by  Bruin  alum. 
Couples-individuals.  Call  for  free  corwuKa- 
tion.  Sliding  scale.  Liz  Gould.  IMr«17869. 
Arlen  Ring,  Ph.D.  -supervisor,  PSY#8070. 
310-578-5957;  pager,  310-572-4092.  Con- 
venient WestvMXxi  location. 


23  Beauty  Services 


SUPER  1  NAILS 

Student   discount  wAXlA  ID.    1735 
wood  Blvd.  310-478-2702.  Open  7  day*  a 
week.  Free  paffclng  urvler  Ross. 


30  Help  Wanted 


MODELS  NEEDED 

PETITE  AND  TALL,  men  arwJ  wonrwn.  Earn 
SlSOCVday.  fashion  cllcnU  include  BeneQon. 
No  experterKie  necessary.  310-551-1823. 

$7/hour  +  BONUS 

Flexible  hours,  LXTLA  Annual  Fund.  Call, 
310-794-0277. 

ACCOUNTING 

Growing  company  seeks  ir>dividual  wA>ack- 
gour^Vmajor  in  accounting,  krvoicir^g,  track- 
ing of  accourtis  payableAeceivable.  Flexible 
hoursA^ork-al-home  possibilty.  Pay  r>ega(l- 
able.   David,  1-800-870-6696. 

ACTORS/MOOELS.  Auditions  by  appoint- 
ments only.  For  commercials,  films,  print  ads. 
All  types/ages  needed.  No  experlerKe  neces- 
sary.  No  fee.  Imawe,  818-222-9091 . 

ADMINISTRATIVE  ASSISTANT.  Dynvnic 
high  profile  norvprofit.  Computer  skills, 
Wir>dows,  WordPerfect,  Paradox.  Fax  or  mail 
resume  w/salary  history:  ESA1DF,  1427  7th 
Street.  f2,  SanU  Monica  90401.  FAX  310- 
458-3937. 

AIDE  NEEDED  FOR 
7-Y/O  AUTISTIC  BOY 

ASSISTANCE  NEEDED  w/daily  living,  be- 
havior, general  cogpitlve  skills.  Full-time  job. 
Aide  will  work  on  team  wAither  profession- 
als. Experierxx  working  w/Autistic  Popula- 
tion preferred.  Perfect  position  If  interested  In 
Special  Education.  Parents  arc  a  State  ap- 
proved NorvPublic  AferKry  (or  Autism.  Staff 
members  have  20-f  years  experience.  Contact 
310-542-4146. 


ALASKA  JOBS! 

ALASKAN  FISHERY  PARKS  AND  TOURIST 
RESORTS  HIRING,  earn  great  $$$  this  sum- 
mer, free  transportation,  room,  board,  get  all 
the  optionsi  Call  SEI 919-490-8629. 

ALASKA  JOBS  Earn  up  to  $6,000Anonth  in 
the  fishing  iryJustry.  Free  transportation. 
Room  and  Board.  Male^emale.  No  expert- 
ence  necessary.  310-285-0085.  EXT  A9340. 
ALASKA  SUMMER  EMPLOYMENT.  Fishing 
Industry.  Earn  to  $3,000-$6,0004ATtonlh 
plus  bei>eflts.  Male^emale.  No  experierKC 
necessary.  206-545-41 55  ext  A59346. 
APARTMENT  ASSISTANT  MANAGER.  $200 
deduction  from  rant  10416  Irene  St  Call 
213-387-S530.  Pai^  2134128-9177. 


Daily  Bruin  ClaMHM 


Tuesday,  May  23, 1995    23 


—  ^ ' 


30  Help  Wanted 


30  Help  Wanted 


Accelerate  Your  Career 
with  the  GaAs  Company 

Vitesse  Semiconductor  Corporation  is  seeking  talented,  self-assured 
graduates  who  are  motivated  t)y  ttie  opportunity  lor  real  contribution, 
recognition  and  responsibility  for  ttie  following  positions  at  our  Camarillo 
tieadquarters: 

•  DESIGN  ENGINEERS  (Analog/Digital)    •  PROCESS  ENGINEERS 

•  PRODUCT/TEST  ENGINEERS  •  CAD  ENGINEERS 

II  you  possess  a  BSEE/MSEE  degree,  this  is  your  opportunity  to  work 

with  leading-edge  engineers  at  a  world  class  company  providing 

high  performance,  high  volume  solutions  to  the  Who's  Who  of , 
telecommunications,  datacommunications  and  automated  test  equipment. 

We  offer  an  attractive  compensation  package  including  equity  participation.' 
Please  mail/FAX  your  resume  to:  Vitene  Semiconductor  Corporation, 
741  Calle  Piano.  Camarillo.  CA  93012.  FAX:  (805)  389-7188    EOE 

l\4/F/D/V. 


VITESSE 

StIMCONlXJCTOn  COrWOMJIOH 


ASIAN  FEMALES 

Shampoo  companies  (Sebastiar^  need  asian 
female  hair  models.  All-ages/all  heights  okayl 
No  experiertce  necessary.  Top  payl  Call  free 
1-800-959-9301. 

ASSISTANT 

for  market  research  firm.  Full-time/part-time. 
Exposure  to  many  irwiustries,  good  telephorw 
skills  needed.  Call  9am-10pm  dally,  i^4rs. 
Rost  310-391-7232. 

ASSISTANT  P/r.  Research,  typing,  filing,  er- 
rands.  MUST  KNOW  WORD/WORO  PER- 
FECT; for  real  estate  investor  In  Bel  Air.  Fax 
resunr>e  310-471-4885. 

Assistant  to  Entertain- 

ment  &  Sports 

Attorney 

In  Century  City  is  sought  to  haryile  varied 
secretarial  duties.  Typing,  filing,  arxi  phor>es. 
Excellent  communicatiorVphone  skills  a 
must.  Light  dictation  ar^  bookkeeping.  1  -2 
years  experience  ideal.  20-22k/yr  plus  bonus. 
Must  be  highly  organized,  detail  oriented, 
conscientious  arxi  computer  literate.  Fax  re- 
sume and  salary  history  to:  Steve  Linett  at 
310-286-1728. 


ASSISTANT.  P/T  mornings  for  computer 
school  in  Westwood.  Need  computer  arxl 
typing  skills,  bookkeeping  and  good  English. 
S9/hr.  310-470-8600. 

ATHLETKVBOYISH  MALE  MODELS.  Earn 
$150-$300  PER  HOUR.  Surfer,  student,  jock 
types.  Must  be  18-24,  clean-shaven  face,  lit- 
tle/rxi  chest  hair.  Playgirl-style  magazir>es, 
videos.  Nudity  required.  Highest  $$$,  imme- 
diate payl  Beginners  vwclcorr^e.  Brad,  310- 
J92-4248. 

BALLCX)NISTS 

Party  decorators,  singing  delivery  drivers,  ar- 
tists, party-planning  assistants  needed  at  Bal- 
loon Celebrations.  Fast-paced,  creative  erwi- 
ronment.  1 0920  LeConte,  Westwood.  310- 
208-1180. 

BARTENDER  TRAINEES.  Earn  $10a$200  da- 
ily. No  experierKC  necessary.  National  Bar- 
lenders.  213-380-3200,  310-558-0608,  818- 
994-8100. 

BARTENOERVWAITERVWAITRESSES.  Bistro 
of  SanU  Monica  hiring  friendly  arxd  energetic 
waiters,  waitresses,  bartenders.  LunclVdirmer, 
full-tim^art-time.  ExperierKc  required. 
2301  Santa  Monica  Blvd. 

BLENDING/SALES 

Now  hirirtg  crew.  Smoothie  King.  Vl/fl. 
11740  San  Vicente  Blvd/Gorham.  Excellent 
opportunity  tor  studcntsl  Call  after  5pm, 
310-826-3050.  EOC. 

BCX>KKEEPER  F/C 

Full  lime,  fO(Ml  wtpmof^.  Lotus  1-2-3,  prop- 
•fty  imn<gwwm  iipeffawo  hdpful.  Berte- 


fils.  SmA  Resume  to  M>4  J.  M«nL  Co.,  225 
No.  Crescent  Oflv,  Beverly  Hills,  CA  9021 0. 

CAMP  COUNSELORS 

B-WEEK  BEACH  ORCNTEO  DAY  CAMP 
PROGRAM;  2-WEEK  HK>I  SIERRA  CAMP- 
OUT.  MINIMUM  AGE  21.  EXPERKNCEO 
W/CHiLOREN,WATER  SPORTS.  $32(VWEEK. 
310-826-7000. 

CAMP  COUNSELORS 

CAMP  HIGHLANDS  In  Pacinc  Palisades, 
lune  26  September  1.  M-F.  9:30am- 2:30pm. 
Experience  with  children  beneficial,  %6/hr. 
Call  Andrew  or  Kurt  3ia459-40e3. 

CAREER 
MINDED 

ECOLOGICALLY  SOUND  product  brokerage 
seeks  outgoing  career-oriented  individual  to 
help  fill  key  entry-level  positions  w/potential 
for  management.  Attitude  more  import«>t 
than  experience.  818-447-0331. 


CASHIER/COFFEE  MAKER,  PTAT  help  want- 
ed for  coffee-cart,  Westwood- location,  ex- 
perlerKe a  plus.  Applications  taken:  1081 
Westwood  Blvd.  In  front  of  Wherehouse, 
lOarrt-lpm,  Friday  5/26.  818-810-8812. 

CASHIERS 

FOR  HOUYWOOD  BOWL  RESTAURANT, 
nighu  Jur>e  3rd-end  of  September,  4-6 
nightsAMeek.  Previous  cashiering  preferred. 
S5.2S^ur  .fgratuity.  213-851-3588  iorap- 
plication. ■ 

CASTING  IMMEDIATELY!  Extras  needed  for 
feature  films,  commercials,  ai\d  music  videos. 
Earn  up  to  $240  per  dayl  No  experience 
needed.  Work  guaranteed!  Call  today  213- 
851-6102. 

CHEMIST  FOR  Q.A. 

^  T*  T  position  open  i^^rtn  vitro  mfe.  company  or  ■ 
requires  Bachelor  degree  in  natural  scierK:es. 
Please  fax  resume,  woric  experience  w/salary 
history  to  Human  Resources  310-453-3050. 
You  will  be  contacted  only  if  you  are  being 
considered  for  the  position. 

CLIENT  OPER.  MNGR 

Professionals  responsible  for  direct  manage- 
merM  of  staff,  all  facets  of  medical  billing,  col- 
lections. Must  have  professional  demeanor, 
ability  to  meet  deadlir>es,  excellent  commu- 
nication, problem  -solving  skills.  Should  have 
3-*-  years  nrtedical  accounts  receivable  man- 
agement experience,  knowledge  of  CPT  and 
ICD-9  diagnosis  coding.  Positions  based  in 
LA.  Fax  resume  to  310-390-8030  or  call  310- 
915-8029.  Medaphis  Physician  Services  Cor- 
poratlon. 

CLIENT  SERV.  MNGR 

Professionals  who  enjoy  servicing  physiciara. 
Must  have  3-«-  years  experience  in  medical 
managenwrvt,  ability  to  interact  w/physiciarH; 
exterMive  krv>wledge  of  CPT  &  ICD-9  diagno- 
sis coding,  managed  care,  capitation,  FFS, 
medical  terminology,  reimbursement  pro- 
cessing. Excellent  communication,  analytical 
&  spreadsheet  skills.  Some  travel  required. 
Positions  based  in  LA,  San  Bcrnadirx).  Fax  re- 
sume to  310-390^8030  or  call  3ia91  5-8029. 
Medaphis  Physician  Services  Corporation. 

COMMUNITY  SERVKIE  OfFCER  (CSO)  Pro- 
grams are  hiring  for  fall  quarter.  Think  ahead, 
apply  now.  15  hrs.  min,  flexible  schedule. 
$6.16  to  start,  $6.63  regular  pay.  Must  be 
full-time  UCLA  student.  Call  310-825-21 48. 

~~  COPYWRITERS! 

WE  NEED  a  sharp  busir>ess  researcherAtvriler 
w/great  writir^g  skills  to  write  Make  Money  at 
Home  reporU.  Recorded  infa:  310-358-7199. 

COUNSaORS,  VNWA.  ARTS,  GYM,  Video, 
Nature,  Ropes,  tnd  KMIr^  InstrucUirs  Need- 
ed by  WLA  Day  Cwnp.  Work  wAiilldren, 
naiM  njn,  and  earn  iftoncy  vils  sumivwr. 
Must  be  ra^Mnsiblt,  anaryitic,  and  enloy 
working  wAMIdrcn.  Oril  3f4>-47l-7474. 

COUNTER  PERSOM/r^iyriOf  AVMLAOLE 
at  Dryclcan  E^tpw.  Afiply  In  panon.  2441 
SanU  Monica  Olwrf.  Santa  Monica,  «M04. 
310-829-9S92. 

CRUISE  SHIPS  &  VACATION  RESORTS  HIR- 
INGI  Earn  up  to  S2,2004/monlh.  Wodd  trav- 
el. F/T  arKi  seasonal  employment  No  experi- 
ence necessary.  Call  310-271-4147,  EXT 
C924. 

CRUISE  SHIPS  HIRING.  Earn  up  to 
$2,0004ynyinth.  World  travel.  Seasonal  and 
full-tinoe  positions.  No  cxp  neccssvy.  For 
info,  call  1 -206-634-0468  ext.  CS9346. 

DANCERS  EXOTIC  WANTED!  New  club  is 
kxiking  for  outgoing,  attractive  girls.  Darters 
average  $2S(yJiiA  and  up.  18^-,  no  experi- 
ence necessary.  Call  818-76S-7739. 

DAY  CAMPS 

serving  Conelo  and  San  Fernando  Valleys, 
SImi,  Camarlfb,  and  Mallbu  seek  fun  caring 
couneekirs  and  special  Instructors  (or  nature, 
gym,  horsebadt  rkJing,  flshlr>gAMallr\g,  rafts, 
MTlmmlrtg,  sports  timtyg,  ropes  course  and 
more.  Now  IntervlewlfMl  81B-865-6263. 


30  Help  Wonted 


DRIVER 

AND  COAOVCOMPANION.  Approx.  3- 
6pm,  Tues-Fri.  IO-6pm,  Saturday  (Varies 
greatly).  Clean  DMV,  insurance,  refc.  serve  of 
humor,  reliable.  818-789-7907. 

EARN  $500-$2500 

on  your  next  casino  tripl  FREE  report  Write 
to:  Casino  Report,  P.O.  Box  571961  Tvz«ia, 
CA91357. 

EARN  EXTRA  MONEY 

PT/rr  without  disturbing  what  you  are  pre- 
sently doing.  One  of  the  fastest  growing  pri- 
vately-OMmed  companies.  Call  213-782- 
7065. 

EARN  UP  TO  SICVHR  cleaning  houses  and 
offices.  Tons  of  work.  Call  today  and  go  to 
work   this  week.   Full    and   part-time   work. 
Ficxibie  schedule.  Wodc  in  your  area.  €ar- 
necewary.  Call  today  at  310-453-1817. 

EASY  MONEY! 

Driver  for  1995-1996  to  pick-up  children 
from  local  school.  Monday-Friday  aftemoorw, 
flexible  hours.  Reliable,  own  car,  insurarKe. 
S8-Sl0^hour.  310275-1835. 

EVENT  STAFF 

EVENT  STAFF  FOR  CONCERTS,  sports,  and 
special  ever^.  P/T.  Work  around  your  acade- 
mic/athletic  schedules.  818-885-7338. 

EXCITING  JOB 

HOUSEKEEPER  wanted,  SM  house.  Charming 
family  w/pets.  Requirements:extrenr)ely  effi- 
cient, good  driver  w/car.  Fu!l-time:summer, 
part-time:school  year.  Salary  rwgotiable.  21 3- 
525-1341. 

FITNESS 
ENTHUSIAST 

Healtf^utritkm  oo.  seeks  entry  levelAngr. 
position.  Attitude  more  importar>t  than  ex- 
perience. $3-5AXyrrK>.  potential.  Call  818- 
447-7455  for  appointment 


Free  Room  ft^Bpard 
plus  $600  a  month 

—  in  Westwood  resident  — 


Fluent  English/Driver's  License 

Available: 

evenings/weekends 

Please  Call: 

(310)470-3589 

ask  for  Jan 


FT-GETTY  TRUST 

Position  open  for  a  resourceful,  nrtotivated, 
ind  resporwible  irxlividual  with  2-3ycars 
busir>ess  experier>ce.  Duties  include  a/p, 
tracking  and  nrtonitoring  construction  costs, 
preparing  contracts,  and  special  projects. 
Proficiency  in  Excel  required,  strong  aptitude 
in  microprocessing  preferred.  Send  resume 
by  June  8th  to:  The  J.  Paul  Getty  Trust,  c/o 
Human  Resources  -  BPO,  401  Wilshire  Blvd. 
*900,  SanU  Monica.  CA  90401 .  No  phone 
calls  please. 

GENERAL  OFFICE 

If  you're  a  positive,  energetic,  and  organiied 
person  who  enjoys  working  with  people,  we 
have  an  excellent  opportunity  for  you.  We're 
a  growing  comparty  with  room  for  advance- 
ni>ent  Casual,  dynamic  envirorwnent.  Pay 
and  berwfits  open  for  discussion.  Call  Susan 
at  310-453-181 7. 

GENERAL  Of FKIE/TELE PHONE:  Westwood 
Public  Relations  Firm  is  kmking  for  an  experi- 
enced, qualified,  enthusiastic  person  to  fill 
our  ger\eral  officc/rcceptiorust  position,  if  you 
are  hardworking,  mature,  and  have  terrific 
telephone  skills,  we  need  you  TODAY!  F/T, 
entry  level  position  offers  salary  plus  berwfits. 
Call  Kathy  at  310-446-4800  or  fax  resume 
and  cover  letter  to  3 1 0-446- 1 896. 


GET  PAID 

|0  watch  TV!  Exciting  new  method.  FREE  24- 
hour  recorded  message  reveals  detaHs.  Call 
ai  8-775-3878  Ext- 101. 

HO$T(ESS) 

CNERGETIC  and  enthusiastic  for  trendy 
Chir«ese  cafe  in  Century  City.  Apply  Yirt 
Yang,  10250  Santa  Monica  Bl.  M-F,  2-7PM. 

HOST/HOSTESVCASHIER,  Needed  for  the 
new  dub  in  Westwood.  PT/FT,  Days  and 
evenings.  SSAtour.  Call  Steve  at  310  208- 
7896,  10870  Weybum. 

INSIDE  SALES 

Nationally  known  machine  tools  sale*  com- 
pany has  opening  at  entry  level  position  for 
assistant  to  national  sales  manager.  Aggres- 
sive, result-oriented  iryiividual  to  develop 
and  maintain  sales  via  Irvofficc  telemarketing 
w/eventual  step-up  to  outside  territory.  Serwl 
resume:  Attn:Johrt.  P.O  Box  570416  Tarzana 
91357-0416. 

Instructors  Wanted 

Looking  for  bright,  enthusiastic  people  to 
teach  SAT  Prep.  High  test  scores  required. 
Transportation  required.  We  will  train.  Flexi- 
ble Hours.  $1Mw.  Servi  Cover  letterAesume, 
including  vour  scores  by  S/)1/95  to:  A  Com- 
petitive Edge,  Attn:  Barry,  1 1 500  W.Olympic 
Blvd.  Suite  400.  WLA,  90064.  No  Phone 
Calls  Plevc. 


30  Help  Wanted 


INTERNATIONAL  EMPLOYMENT-  E»n  up 
to  $25-S4S^our  teaching  basic  conversation- 
al English  in  Japan,  Taiwan,  or  S.  Korea.  No 
leaching  bafckground  or  Asian  languages  re- 
quired. For  informalfon  call  206-632-1146 
ext  J59345. 

INTERNTIONAL  JOBS 

EARN  UP  TO  $2S-$5a/hr.  teaching  basic 
corwersational  English.  Work  in  Japan,  Tai- 
wan or  South  Korea.  No  Asian  languages  or 
teaching  background  required.  310-288- 
0212,  EXT  J9204. 

.    JEWISH  HEBREW 

and  Sunday  Schools  need  teachers,  1995-96. 
Good  Jewish  Education  and  love  of  children 
desired.  Yonaton  Shultz  213-852-6570. 

LAW  OFFICE  — 

Clerical  secretarial  positions.  Must  know 
WordPerfect.  Have  office  experier>ce.  Good 
typing  skills,  flexible  hours.  Wilshire  &  Clen- 
don.  3ia475-0481. 

LIE  FOR  $$$. 

Fox  Televisfon  wants  you  for  a  new  show. 
Call  Todd  at  818-973-2392. 

LIFEGUARDS 

Certified  lifeguards  wanted  for  pool  in  Pacific 
Palisades.  $7-9/hr.  Call  Andrew  or  Kurt  at 
310-459-4063.  Bam-IOpm. 

MALE  MODEL  for  men's  health  magazine 
ads.  Pays  $200.  Send  photo  of  face  and 
chest.  1 1 693  San  Vicente,  Suite  1 59,  Los  An- 
geles,  CA  90049. 

MALE  MODELS.  Asian,  Eurasian,  and  all 
types.  No  height  requirement.  Hot  head, 
cards,  posters,  mags.  Good  money.  FunI  213- 
664-2999  24hours. 


30  Help  Wanted 


RADIO  ANNOUNCERVDISK  JOCKEYS.  No 

expericr>ce  necessary,  produce^wat  shows 
for  our  statfons.  Spai*  time.  Free  trainir^ 
great  benefiu,  21 3-468-0064,  24  hrs. 

RECEPTIONIST 

F/T,  rteeded  lo  answer  phones,  file,  photoco- 
py, do  light  typing  perform  mailroom  duties 
and  run  occasforul  errarvis  lor  a  motion  pic- 
ture company  in  BH.  Hrs:9«n-6pm. 
$40QMl  Paid  parking.  Send  resunw  lo  Per- 
sonnel, 9536  Wilshire  Blvd.,  0410,  Beverly 
Hills,  CA  90212. 

RECEPTIONIST  WANTED  for  BH  Office. 
Phones,  general  office  duties.  P/T  or  YfT.  Ex- 
periervre  in  Microsoft  Programs  preferred. 
Please  call:  310-657-9252. 

RECEPTK)NIST.  Entry-level  position  available 
immediately  for  an  energetic,  hard-working 
person.  Job  irKludes  heavy  phor>es,  client  irv 
ieracfldn  artd  light  office  duties.  Must  have^ 
good  phone  marwters  and  front  office  ap- 
pearance. Call  310-274.8025  for  an  appoint- 
ment  ■ 

RECEPTIONIST/FRONT  OFFKTE  MANAGER. 
Have  a  job  waling  for  you  when  you  gradu- 
ate! FA  position  in  a  Westwood  Public  Rela- 
lions/Campaign  Management  Firm  requires 
an  energetic,  motivated  self-staner.  Tele- 
phor>e  skills  a  must!  Great  entry  level  oppor- 
tunity. Salary  plus  benefits.  Call  Kathy  at  310- 
446-4800  or  fax  resume  to  3ia446-1896 
TODAY.  . 


RETAIL  SALES 

P/T  help  (or  children's  ckithing  store. 
Saturdays  a  must  $7Av.  WLA  area.  310-204- 
1896. 

RETAIL  SALES.  ChiWren's  book  shop.  iS4ust 
be  available  Sat.  and  have  knowledge  of 
children's  books.  WLA  310^559-2665. 


MED.  COLLECTORS        RETAIL/RECEiyiNG 


Candidates  must  have  experience  working 
w/medi-cal,  miedicare,  HMO,  private  insur- 
ances. Billing  skills  required.  Fax  resume  to 
310-390-8030  or  call  310-915-8029.  Mt- 
daphis  Physician  Services  Corpor^ion. 

MEDICAL  ASSISTANT 

for  out-patient  clinic.  Must  be  fluent  in  Eng- 
lish/lapanese.  Resunnes  only  please,  to:  1950 
Sawtelle  Blvd.  Suite  145,  LA,  90025. 

MGNT  TRAINEE 

No  experience  r>ecessary.  Company  expand- 
ing in  area.  Seeking  enthusiastic  people  to 
manage  branch  offices.  $400(Vmonth 
♦benefits.  213-463-0633 

MODELS 

needed  for  posters  and  catalog  assignments. 
All  types  5'2'-5'10'.  Photo  lest  required  for 
all  applicants.  Top  pay.  310-276-7648. 
MODELS:  YOUNG  MEN  WANTED  for  nude 
and  semi-nude  modeling.  Good  pay.  imme- 
diate  work.  Call  Derek  213^45  9669. 

MTV  EXTRAS 

18-25  years  for  MTV  Malibu  Beach  House. 
Skate  iialf-pipe  celebrities,  pool,  and  nwrel 
5/19-9/2.  Call  81»50S-7545I 

NATIONAL  PARKS  HIRING.  Seasonal  &  full 
time  employment  available  ai  National  Parks, 
Forests  &  Wildlife   Preserves.  Benefits  ♦  bo- 
nuses!  Call:  1-206-545-4604,  ext.  N59341. 


NEW  FACES  NEEDED  NOW 

•  For  TV  Commercials 

•  Movies 

•  Catalogs 

•  Videos 

call  immediately 

(310)659-4855 


OFFICE  ACCOUNTANT/BOOKKEEPER.  $9- 
$12/hr,  PT/FT.  Prefer  junior  or  above,  MUST 
KNOW  Excel,  typing  skills.  3-blocks  from 
UCL^  Call  Ron  31 0^70-61 75. 

OFFICE  ASSISTANT.  FA  this  summer.  P/T 
during  school  year.  Small  Brer^twood  law 
firm  seeks  organized  individual  with  an  inter- 
est in  law  to  do  filing  and  miscellaneous  of- 
fice tasks.  Flexible  schedule.  Hl^  to  start. 
Call  310-207-5400  exl.75  for  details. 

OFFICE  ASSISTANT.  f/T.  Type  4Swpm,  gen- 
eral clerical  skiHs.  aood  opportunity,  pleasar^ 
erwironwant  Maad  responsible,  ir>deponderH 
■  worker.  tBW  to  start  310-820^3651. 

OFflGE  HBf.  <3«viMl  wwk  for  court  report- 


♦tddrfng  li^t  typing 
jnd  ^ting.  Vff.   FlexMt  hours. 


NEEDED 


Eii|Hiil«WOi#Ml»»Wl>'ii»<  fA  job  during 
sumnwr  ««lth  SMktenlial  painting  company. 
$^4Vf>our  startk^wage.  Call  Paul,  310-504- 
4494. 

PERSONAL  ASSISTANT  for  young  profession 
al  disabled.  Help  w^wme  care.  Nursing 
student  preferred.  Early  morning,  3-5 
days/week.    $9/hour.    WLA.    310-312-0615- 

leave  message. 

,  PERSONAL  TRAINER.  Upscale  fitness  center. 
i^  Fernando  West  Valley.  Knowledge  of 
anatomy,  Call  Tim:  818-705-6500  ext  256. 

POSTAL  AND  GOVERNMENT  JOBS. 
$2lAK>ur  4-  ber>efks.  No  experience,  will 
train.  Toapply  call  1-800-536-3040. 

PRFCT  SUMMER  JOB 

MARKETINC  Ar«  you  eamir^  what  you're 
worth?  Are  you  ready  lo  focus  and  be  your 
best?  Call  310-281-81 11. 

PRIVATE    SWIM    INSTRUCTORS    at   client 
>e«qes.  S144lMv«bonuses.  Flexible  Bch«J. 
uling.  Hiring  for  summer.  WSI  plus  slroi^  ex- 
perience. Call  John  310-271-3441. 


Beverly  Hills  Menswear  store  seeks  detail-ori- 
er>ted,  computer-literate  individual  for  nHjIti- 
raceted  position.  Most  possess  exceller«  com- 
nHinication  and  organizational  skills.  Full- 
time.  310-471-6436. 

SALES  PERSON 

for  afterrMM>ns.  Paris  Pastry.  No  experier>ce 
necessary.  $5.5(^xxjr.  Apply  in  person:  1448 
Westwood  Blvd.  or  call  Corinne  310-474- 
8888. 

SANTA  MONICA  REAL  ESTATE  DCVELOP- 
_MtNT  CO.:  Looking  for  one  or  nwre  enjhu- 
siastic  irxiividuals  who  want  to  learn  about 
real  estate  through  assisting  in  the  leasing  of 
our  SoullMirn  Califorr>ia  shopping  centers. 
Will  gain  immer«e  knowledge  aryi  experi- 
erx^  in  real  properly  transactions,  ranging 
from  tenant  prospecting  and  canvasing  to 
lease  documentation.  $1000/n>onth  +  bonus 
of  $500  per  deal-sumnwr  position.  Please 
fax  resunw  to:  Bollcnbacher  &  Kelton,  \nc. 
310  399-0062.  Attn:  Brooks  Borror. 

SCHOOLBUS  DRVRS 

MAKE  $9-10/HR.  DRIVING  CHILDREN. 
¥/l-Pr(.  No  experience  r>ecessary,  we  will 
train.    310^472  7474. 

SECRETARY/RESEARCH  ASSISTANT  for  psy 
chiatric  research  program.  FA.  Requires  BA 
in  social  sciences.  Must  have  expertise  in 
WordPerfect,  SltVhour.  Brenda,  310-824- 
4447. 

SERVERS 

.WAITERS/WAITRESSES  for  Hollywood  Bowl 
Picnic  Baskets  Restaurant,  nights  Jurw  3-er>d 
of  September.  Call  21 3-851  -3588  for  applica- 
tion^  

SERVERS  WANTED/BIKINI.  Earn  $100*Ahift. 
Must  be  outgoing,  attractive,  18^-.  Call  818- 
7655217. 

SUMMER  CAMP 

IN  MALIBU.  Salary  plus  room  and  board.  Po- 
sitions include:  sailing,  water  ski,  pool  super- 
visor, rifiery,  song  leader  and  cabin  coun- 
selors. Call  for  application  and'  more  informa- 
lion:  81»8e0  3700. ^__ 

SUMMER  JOBS 

Activists  needed  to  work  on  an  initiative 
campaign.  Havt  fun,  make  a  differerxre,  earn 
a  paycheckl  $25a$60Q/week.  310-449- 
5390. 

SUMMER  JOBS 

WORTH  REMEMBERING.  Earn  (or  school 
while  t>eing  a  camp  counselor.  A  grc«l 
summer  job  for  students.  Must  Hvt  in  LA  or 
Ventura  County.  Weekend  intervlewtng  *l^. 
Call  818-865-6263. ^__^ 

SUMMER  JOBS! 

Hiring  now.  5-10  full  and  part  tWMe  tabs 
earning  $1Q|^.  Jobs  filled  firsl-oanw,  M- 
serve  basis.  Call  310374-4993. 

SUMMER  JOBS.  Earn  SB-KVhr  intervicwir^ 
al  beach-sites/onthe-phor>e  Uun.12-Sep.30). 
Full  time  requires  2-3  wcekend^irKirHh.  Part- 
lime  days,  nighu,  aryi  w^ekerwk.  Resume  to: 
Dr.  Mitchell  Nidcs:  1 145  Cayiey  Ave,  #301, 
LA.  CA  90024.  310-209  6016. 


SUMMER  JOBS 

Fine  High  Sierra  Family 
Resort  at  cool  7500' 
seeks  live-in  counselors 
(20up)  to  TtACH: 

•  Western  Equitation  (2) 

•  Canoeing  (1) 

•  Sailing  ( 1 ) 

•  Pre-School  oxp  to  worK 

with  children  2-6  yrs  (4) 

•  Swimming  -♦;  Lifeguard  (2) 
•Adult  Crafts  A  Jewelry  (1) 

800-2  2  7-9966 

Call  Dally  or  Surxlays 
Dat«»s     Jun  \F>  to  Sept  7,  19<?r> 


INK  SMUDGE  ON  PAGE 


24    Tuesday,  May  23, 1995 


Daily  Bruin  Classified 


30  Help  Wanted 


32  Career  Opportunities 


32  Career  Opportunities 


33  Jobs  Wanted 


I 


I  SUMMER 
'       JOBS 


Now  hiring  students  and 

teachers  for  a  variety  of 

temporary  positions.  If  you 

have  office  clerical  skills 

such  as  Word  Processing, 

Data  Entry  PBX. 
Receptionist,  Secretarial, 

Typing,  etc. 
Call  for  an  appointment: 
Westwood  — ^510)475-7700 
Los  Angeles      (213)386-3440 
Pasadena         (818)796-8559 
Encino  (818)906-1145 

Orange  County  (714)857-1444 

Stivers 

Temporary 

Personnel 

p:stablished  1945 


$90,000 

INCOME  POTENTIAL 

JUNIORS  &  SENIORS 

DISCOVER  HOW  YOU  CAN  HAVE 
7^  CAREER  AS  ArSTOCK BROKER- 
CALL  1-800-571-8136 


TELEMARKETING 

PfT  Appt  Setters 

For  Major  Cars  Org.  in  Pleasant  Bay 

His  Ofc  Must  Type  35  wpm+  Prior  TM 

exp  pref.  $9/hr  +  comm 

(310)855-8603 


34  Internships 


ENTERTAINMENT  PR. 

INTERN  at  celebrity  PR  firm.  No  fMy  but 
great  opportunity  to  learn.  ScTibbl  credit 
available.  Flexible  bourt.  Beverly  Hiitt  area. 
Call  Jer^nifer   at  310-2B1-1  605. 

^NTERNS  NEEDED 


*•*•*•*•  • 
SUMMER  WORK 

$10.15  Starting  Pay  Rate 

Part  &  Fiill-time  positons. 
No  experience  required. 

Flex.  Hrs.,  Training 

Provided.  Scholarships  & 

Co-Op  Programs  available. 

For  Details  Call: 

Long  Beach  area     Tl  0  7W  1 66 1 
West  LA. = ^IO«J85  ^^366 


No.  Ca/Bay  area     4()8-45()-y57 1 
Sacramento  916-444-9096 

Hawaii  H()H-«42-4597 

•  •••••••    • 


BOOKKEEPING 

Medical  records.  Lxcellent  opportunity  for 
experierH:e,  supervised  by  CPA.  Computer 
krwwiedge,  reliable,  personable,  self-rrwti- 
vated,  skilled,  intelligent.  Fax  resurr>e:  213- 
342^876. 

Century  City  InvestmertI  Banking  Firm  seek- 
ing broker  trair>ee  and/or  broker.  Great  op- 
portunity! FA.  Call  Denny  Artache  310-843- 
9007. 


GRADUATING? 

ENVIRONMtNTAL  MARKtTINC  COMPANY 
seeks  irxJividuals  for  entry- level/manager  po- 
sitior^s.  Attitude  more  important  than  experi- 
ence. $3000-5000/monlh  potential.  818-447- 
7455. 


MULTI-MILLIONAIRE  seeks  leaders.  Those 
wanting  financial  stability  now  call  1-800- 
720-2253  Exl-1 956. 


BARTENDER 
TRAINEES 

•no  experience  necessary 
•earn$100-$200  daily 
•more  jobs  than  graduates 
•nation  wide  job  placement 

NATIONAL  BARTENDERS 
SCHOOL 

1-800-646-MIXX 

(6499) 

10  So.  Cal.  Locations 


Fast  paced  entertainment  Manogement^ro- 
duction  CO.  seeks  motivated  interrw.  Irvrred- 
Ible  ir>dustry  exposure,  rvo  pay.  Credits: 
'Hook,'  Jade,'  'Universal  Soldier.'  Fax  r^- 
sume:  310-996-1892,  Attn:  Carol. 

MUPPETS! 

Do  you  love  the  Muppcts?  Well  then,  contact 
Halle  at  213-960-4096  about  a  script  reading 
aryj  research  Intermhip. 

TALENT  AGENCY.  Literary  Agent  seeking  In- 
tern/Assistant. Flexible  hours,  great  experi- 
ery:e,  room  for  advar>cement.  Non-paid.  310- 
278-3600. 


35  Child  Care  Wanted 


BRENTWOOD 

Respor>sible,  caring  live-out  for  4-y/o  boy. 
Saturdays,  some  weekday  evenings.  Flexible 
hours.  Need  car,  excellent  references.  Long- 
term.  310-820-7847. 

CHILDCARE  WANTED,  lOhoun/week  (or  a 
9-year  old  girl.  Mutt  drive.  Mostly  early, 
weekdays,  ever>lng  hours.  Bel  Air  Area.  310- 
777-0074. 


32  Career  Opportunities 


£NTRy-LEVEL  OPPORTUNITIES 


SWIM  INSTRUCTORS 

tarn  $)0-14Air.  Spring  and  summer.  West 
LA/Vallcy.  Experience  a  plus.  Background 
working  with  children.  Flexible  hours.  Greg 
310  289  72S4. 

miMAKKETLKS  NEE  IX  D  IMMEDIATELY. 
luccllcnl  pay,  flexible  hours,  near  campus. 
Openings  available  immediately.  Telemarket- 
ing expcrierK:e  preferred.  Call  310-552- 
b2S3. 

TELEPHONE  SALES 

INVESTMENT  FIRM  located  in  Sherman  Oak» 
socking  broker's  assistant.  Part-time,  hourly 
wane   ♦bonuses.  Call  818-783-4900. 

TRANSLATOR 

Student  fluent  in  Chir>ese  for  book  project. 
Need  good  translation  skills  (Chir>cse  to  Eng- 
lish). Good  pay.  Set  own  hours.  310  285- 
8616. 


US  GCJVT.  JOBS  hiring  now:  IOC's  of  Entry 
level  openings  updated  daily.  Call  loll  free  1- 
800  549  23<)0,  Exl»3B72. 

US/INT'L  CO. 

presently  operating  in  25  countries.  Expand- 
ing rapidly.  Needs  help  immediately.  PA 
$50a2,(X»/rTw;  F/T  $2,000-6,000/mo.  310^ 
274  3440. 

WAITERS 

WAITERS/WAITRESSES.  Alleast  2  years  ex- 
pcrierK*  in  Frer>ch  service,  banquet  facility. 
Must  own  tuxedo.  Call  Avi,  3ia470-2821, 
10am-3pm.  10500  Wilshire  Blvd. 

WORK=FUN 

Management.  International  marlteling  firm 
expanding  in  L.A  area.  Looking  for  people 
wfx>  like  to  travel  and  enjoy  working  with 
people.  3-5K/mo.  potential.  Call  818447- 
2580. 

WRITER 

SMALL  CENTURY  CITY  LAW  FIRM  seeks  fH 
excellent  writer  to  prepare  immigration  peti- 
tions. No  legal  experierKe  required.  Word- 
processir>g  experierx-.e.  Degree  Required. 
$11A>r  start  CallAax  resume  and  writing 
sample  (4-paget  max.).  Phone:31 0-553- 
6600.  Fax:3iaS53^2616. 

WRITIRS  EXCHANGE  has  work  for  creative- 
ly-talented writers.  Paperback  novels,  Non- 
Fidton  Books,  Magazir>e  articles,  Screerv 
plays.  Openings  for  good  irHcrrw.  310-209- 
0681,  Vernon. 


31   Temporary  Agencies 


MAC/IBM  SKILLS 

Worth  SlttAwur.  Don't  gp  to  a  temp  fym. 
rXin't  join  the  herd.  Call  SUPERIOR  TEMPS. 
310-312-0131. 


Leadins  downtown  L. A. -based  investment  management  firm  has  immediate  full-time 
openings  for  bright,  motivated  grads  interested  in  gaining  exposure  to  a  large,  corporate 
environment.  Positions  are  currently  available  in  departments  ranging  from  human  resources 
to  marketing.  With  your  l-i-  years  of  office  experience  and  strong  academic  background,  you 
will  be  able  to  fully  utilize  your  excellent  communication  and  organizational  skills.  ALL 
AAAJORS  ARE  WELCOME. 

We  offer  a  competitive  salary  and  attractive  benefits  plan  that  includes  medical/dental/vision 
coverage,  educational  assistance,  retirement  and  401  (k)  plans,  and  health  club 
reimbursement. 

Please  send  resume  to: 

BRUIN  OPPORTUNITIES 

PO  Box  2059         ^~ 
Los  Angeles,  CA  90051 


EOE 


y 


PC  SOFTWARE  SUPPORT 

Prestigious  international  downtown  Los  Angeles-based  investment  management  firm  seeks 
bright,  organized,  team-oriented,  professional  grad  to  provide  user/PC  support  for  its  investment 
team.  You  will  aid  in  the  utilization  of  application  software  (Word,  WordPerfect,  Excel,  Lotus, 
CC;mail,  LotusNotes),  including  user  support,  training,  troubleshooting,  and  maintenance, 
Degree  in  CS  or  Econ/Bus,  with  strong  academic  record  preferred.  Strong  working  knowledge 
of  IBM-related  products  is  essential;  financial  industry  experience  a  plus. 

We  offer  an  excellent  starting  salary  and  benefits  packages  which  includes  health  club  and 
educational  reimbursement,  medical/dental/vision  coverage,  retirement  plan  and  401  (k),  and 
significant  parking/commuting  sukjsidies. 

Please  send  resume  to: 

BRUIN  PC  SUPPORT 

P-O-  Box  2059 

Los  Angeles,  CA  90051 

EOE 


mmm% 


/yj 


35  Child  Core  Wanted 


OCCASIONAL  BABYSITTER  needed  for  two 
children,   8  and    6  yean.    \^,  rcfererKO. 

Woodland  Hills.  818-592-6263. 

Respomible  person  to  help  out  with  two 
children,  afterrxmrWevenings,  some  wec- 
keryis.  Possible  driving  llgra-housekeepir^ 
References  required.  Call  Nancy  310-47S- 
8359. 

SUMMER  SITTER  (fun,  energetic  sludenO 
r>eeded  for  1 3  year-old  boy.  Daytime  hours. 
West  Hollywood  area.  Car  needed.  Female 
prcfvred.  21  ^931  -0044,cxt261 . 


49  Apartments  for  Rent 


I^MfMUTE  to  UCLA 

WESTWOOD-  SS25-S800  itudicVl -bdrm. 
fumlshe<Vlin(umished,  pool,  laurviry,  ry>  pete, 
no  parking.  1 -year  lease.  310-824-3000. 


1-BDRM$575 

Huge  apartments.  Ideal  for  roommates.  Gar- 
den courtyard,  pool,  ^C,  phor>e-entry.  Near 
Sherman  Oaks  Galleria.  Mirnjtes  to  campus. 
818-997-7312. 

T-BEDROOM  $675 

Garden  courtyard.  Quiet  residential  area.  Ap- 
pliarKes,  blirvJs,  parking,  laundry,  and  nrmrel 
Bike  or  Blue  bus  to  carr>pu».  310-477-0725. 

3-bd/2-ba,  $960/mo 

WLA  Corwenient  to  campus,  quiet,  rtewly 
painted,  laundry,  bright.  Available  Imme- 
diately. 11521  Rochester  Ave.  Informa- 
tion/open  house,  call  310-476-2317. 

3KD  AND  LA  CIENEGA.  Huge  1 -bedroom 
apartment.  Sunny,  immaculately  maintained, 
parking,  $700Anonth.  Call  llene  213-651- 
4002. 

AFFORDABLE  APT. 

PALMS.  S475-singlc,  $575-1 -bedroom.  Re- 
fridgerator,  stove,  disposal,  A/C,  pool,  park- 
ing, laur>dry.  Open  house  Saturday/Sunday  1  - 
5pm.  101  36  National  Blvd.  310-836-1413. 

AMAZING  DEAL 

WLA  1 629  Brockton.  Single*  $530.  New 
appliarKcs,  carpet,  vertical-blirwis,  cable 
ready,  gated.  Good  student  discount  on  park- 
ing.  31 0-477-01 12. 

BEVERLY  HILLS  ADJ 

l«.2-BEDRC)OMS  S725  $895.  SOME 
W/HARDVW30D  FLOORS.  ONLY  1/i 
BLOCK  TO  PICO  BUS.  ASK  ABOUT  BIG 
BONUSill  310-839-6294.  " ^ 

BRENTWOOD 

2-bdrnVl-bth  for  rent.  11651  Gorham  Ave., 
N  of  San  Vicente,  $775.  310-471-5388. 

BRENTWOOD  ADI 

Bright  spacious  upper  bachelor.  All  utilities 
paid  (or  including  laundry  facilities.  $449. 
310-3120265. 

BRENTWOOD  ADJ.  1  mile  to  campus.  Large 
single,  $625,  available  jurw  7th.  Large  1- 
bdrm,  $735,  available  June  21st.  1235  Feder- 
al  Ave.  310-477-7237. 

BRENTWOOD 

Gated  building,  $105(ymonth.  Airy  3-bed- 
roonV2-bath.  Fireplace,  stov^ridge,  laur>dry, 
Berber  carpet,  miniblinds.  1/2-block  from 
Wilshire  bus.  Grad  student  preferred.  310- 
275-7139. 

BRENTWOOD.  $1 1 75/month.  Luxury 
2bdrm,  2bath.  New  security  building.  Gated 
parking.  Prime  area.  508  Barrington.  213- 
934-5000. 

CLOSE  TO  UCLA 

WEST  LA.  Bundy/Sania  Monica  Blvd.  1-bed, 
1-bath.  $60Q^mo.  Laur>dry  room  available. 
Call  evenin^ts,  310-820-7776. 


^COMPLETELY  REMODELED* 

LARGE  UNITS 

PICO/ROBERTSON  AREA 

1,2  &3  BDRMS  0  $550,  $750,  $950 

310-657-8756  ANNE 


CULVER  CITY.  $685.  2  bedroom  duplex,  se- 
cure, quiet,  laundry,  yard,  garage.  Buses,  off- 
ftrect  parking.  Near  Sony  Studios.  Avallble 
luly  1.310-837-6779. 

EAST  OF  VILLAGE 

Large  2-bdrnV2-ba.  1/2-block  to  campus. 
Gated-cntry  and  2-car  parking,  large  closet, 
dishwathcr,  microwave.  No  pets.  $129S&up. 
310-208-2376. 

FREE  LAUNDRY 

CULVER  CITY.  3^2.  Miniblinds,  track  light- 
ing, NEW  Berber  capel.  Stove,  D/W,  2-cv 
parking.  4-miles  UCLA.  $1200.  213-936- 
2406. 

LARGE  SINGLE 

Quiet  area,  Wilshire  district,  sepyate  kitch- 
er^athroom,  furnished/unfurnished.  Trust- 
worthy student  preferred.  Call  Dante  al  City 
News  (eve)  714-773-4902.  $395/nrH>nth. 

MAKE  A  DEAL!! 

WLA/PALMS.  Single  apartment.  $550.  Clean, 
large  pool,  convenient  to  shopping  vnd 
Ua\  310-204-4332. ^ 

MAR  VISTA,  $645.  2-bed/2  balh.  Newer,  2- 
story,  custom  XCNtrktamt,  fireplace,  gated  ga- 
rage, unU  alarm.  Open  7-day^-5.  11748 
Courtlei(^  Dr.  3ia391-1076. 

MAR  VISTA,  $845.  2-bedroom/2-bath.  New- 
er, 2-story  custom  townhoutc.  Gated  garage, 
unit  alarm,  fireplace.  Open  7-day^-5. 
1 1 748 Courtlel«h  Dr.  3ia391-1076. 


Daily  Bruin  Classified 


Tuesday,  May  23, 1995    25 


49  Apartments  for  Pent 


PALMS.  2-f  1  upper,  bright,  <^lct,  gated  park- 
ing, new  carpet  $675.  Available  now.  Call 
Marios.  310-829-0569. 

PALMS.  Discounted  apartmertts.  Ibdrnrv 
$550,  2bdrrTVlba-  $725^  bachekw  apart- 
nr«enU-  $425.  Minutes  to  Century  City  and 
Westwood.  3264  Overland.  310-837-3013. 

PALMS/WLA. 

1 -bedroom,  2-bedroom,  3-t>edroom,  from 
$550  up.  Bright,  quiet,  carpet/drapes, 
stove/refrigerator,  parking.  Close  to  bus,  free- 
ways,  shoppinn.  No  peU.  310-479-8099. 


LUXURY  LIVING  AT  STUDENT  PRICES       PALMS:  SINGLE&1BD 


RESERVE  YOUR  APARTMENT 


[•1^ 


S>^«"11.  TO 

2  STUDENTS 

0^4eBE0BOOt^ 

"  UP  TO 

3  STUDENTS 

^  UP  TO 

5  STUDENTS 


ROOFTOP  SUNDECK  •  JACUZZI 

FITNESS  CENTER  •  SAUNA  •  BBO 

GATED  PARKING  (EXTRA  SPACES  AVAIL  ) 

CENTRAL  AIR/HEAT  •  EXTRA  LARGE  PATIOS 

INDIVIDUAL  APT  ALARM  SVSTEMS 

24HR.  STUDY  ROOM  •  ON-SITE  LAUNDRY 


3  BLOCKS  TO  CAMPUS 

FREE  ROOMMATE  LOCATION  SERVICE 


824-9691 


PM- 


"^  MAR  VISTA  Jt"! 


2B0.  2BA,  2  STORY 

CUSTOM  TOWNHOMES. 

GATED  GARAGE.  CENTRAL  AIR, 

FIREPLACE.  UNIT  ALARM 

*  1 1 748  COURTLEIGH  DR  $845 

•  PALMS  * 

2  BD,  2BA  CUSTOM  TOWNHOME. 

FIREPLACE,  BALCONY,  GATED 

GARAGE,  ALARM  IN  UNIT 

♦  3614  PARIS  DR  $995 

^    CALL  (310)  391  1076 
'    0^*         TO  SEE  THE 
la         LOVELY  APAfrrUENTS  .1 


NEAR  EVERYTHING 

WEST  LA.  $675+sccurity  deposit.  1-bdrm/1 
bath.   1410  S.Barrington.    310-671-8570  or 
310-410-1499. 

NEAR  SCHOOL 

BRENTWOOD,  11675  Darlington.  2-bed- 
rooms/2-balhs  from  $1100  and  up.  310-410- 
]499.  310-671  8570. 

PALMS  $575 

l-bdrnVI-ba,  large  upper  quiet  unit. 
Refrigerator,  stove,  parking,  laundry.  3219 
Bagley.  310-206-9975,   day.  213  876-0371, 

evening. 

PALMS  $595,  1 -bedroom  security  building, 
very  quiet,  all  appliarxxs.  Convenient  to 
campus.  Security  deposit  $100.  A/C,  laundry. 
310-837-7061. 

PALMS  $750.  2-bdrm/1  -ba,  refrigerator,  dish- 
washer, stove,  central  air.  Fireplace,  two  urv 
dergrourxi  parking.  Quiet.  Bus  #12.  6-year 
new  security  building.  310-556-1686. 

PALMS  2-BR  CONDO 

Stove,  dishwasher,  A/C,  balcony,  security 
building  and  parking.  10-minutes  from  carrv 
pus.  $75(ymonth.  Don,  310-636-9962,  310- 
838-1600  x-641 4. 

PALMS  371 7CARDIFF 

HUGE,  2-BED/2.BATH,  $875.  UPPER,  FIRE- 
PLACE, EXTRA  CLOSET,  MX  AMENITIES, 
GATED,  NEWER  BUILDING,  QUIET.  1  BED, 
$675.  13-MIN  TO  UCLA  NEAR  THE  10 
AND  405.  310-836-7146  OR  310-836- 
0131. 

PALMS,        SpKkMM       2-bdmV2-ba        apt 

corrvenlent  freeway,  shops.  Laundry,  secured 
parking.  Sublet  available  for  July,  August. 
$80(Vtatal,    $40(ypcrMn.    Call   Kevin,    310- 

390-6602. 

PALMS-3675  VINTON.  2N0  FLOOR  2-\arf^ 
unfurnished  bedt^-bath.  $77Symo.  Call 
310-544-3262. 


PALMS.  $99S,  2-bed/2-bath,  custom  town- 
home,  flreplaoe,  balcony,  gated  garagi, 
alarm  In  urtit  3614  Farte  Dr.  310-391-1076, 
837-0906. 

PALMS.  $995,  2-be<V2-bath,  custom  town- 
home.  Fireplace,  balcony,  gated  garage, 
alarm   In  unit.  3614  Farls  Dr.  310-391-1076, 

837-0906. 

PALMS.  $995.  2-b«d/2-bath,  Custom  town- 
home,  fireplace,  balcony,  gated  garage, 
alym  in  unliL  3614  F«ri«  Dr.  310-391-1076, 
837-0906. 


Single,  $495.  Ibdrm,  $595.  1  month  free 
rent  Appliances,  no  pets.  Call  9am.7pm  310- 
837-4196.  Ask  for  manager. 

Professional  Bidg 

WESTw6oD-2-BED/2-BATH,  BEAUTIFUL 
PARK  VIEW,  balcony,  large-bcdroomj,  walk- 
in  closets,  full-amcnitics,  rooftop-pool/jacuz- 
ai.  Ready  nmve-in.  $1350.  Call  appoint- 
ment:  1  380  Veteran  310-477-5108. 

RESERVE  NOW 

WESTWOOD.  FALL  AND  SUMMER 
RENTALS.  Ibdrm  from  $885,  2bdrfTV2ba 
from  $1195.  Walk  to  UCLA  and  village. 
Quiet  small  building  with  security  parking. 
Call  between  9am  arxi  7pm  for  an  appoint- 
nrmnt.  310-206-4835.  519  Clenrock  Avenue. 

SANTA  MONICA 

3-bedroonr>/2-bath  w/garage.  15-mlnutes  to 
UCLA  Half-block  south  of  Wilshire.  For  N/S 
grad  student.  Available  7/1.  $160(Vmonth. 
310-828-6621. 

SHERMAN  OAKS 

$735.  Gated,  2-bed/2-bath,  central  air,  dish- 
washer. Also  single,  $450,  1  3406  Moorpark 
St.  818-907-9237  or  816-222  8298. 

SINGLE,  $425 

WLAPALMS.  Stove,  refrigerator.  Convenient 
to  Westside,  UCLA  and  shopping.  Call  310- 
559-7571. 

SINGLES  &  BACHS 

WESTWOOD.  $475-$780.  Overlooks  West- 
wood  Park.  Clean,  quiet.  Pool,  patio,  gated- 
parking,  entry-system.  Available  immediate- 
ly -)une,  July,  August.  Terri  3ia477-6352. 

STUDENT  SPECIAL 

SINGLE  APARTMENTS.  Near  buses.  Com- 
pletely renovated.  Bike  or  ride  to  campus. 
Near  parks.  Laur>dry  and  parking.  Massachu- 
setts E.of  405.   $510.  310-479-2819. 


SPECTACaUIR 

Split-level  single  / 1 


•across  from  UCLA 

Utilities  paid  for  select  units 
Assigned  gated  parking  included 


535Gaytey     (310)208-3818 


TOWNHOUSE 

VM.A,  2-BDRAV2.5-BATH,  newer,  well-main- 
tained, corwenienlly  located,  security  bulg- 
ing, subterrar>ean  parking  laundry.  31C)-479- 
6656. 

UNIQUE 

WESTWOCKVCENTURY  CITY.  Large,  spa- 
clout  singlet.  Starting  at  $60(Vmonth.  Air, 
Pool,  5-mlnulet  LXIA  Pleaie  Call  Pamela 
310-474-5700. 

WALK  TO  UCLA 

Westwood.  Bacnekir  apartment.  Hardwood 
floor.  Full  bath  and  shower,  refrigerator/courv 
tcr,  no  Ml  kitchen.  Utilitict  included. 
$455^ionth.  310-206-6265. 

WALK  TO  UCLA 

WESTWOOD.  Taking  reservations  for  sum- 
mer and  fall.  Bachelor,itudlo,  Ibdrm  with  pa- 
tio, and  2bdrm.  HartKvood  floors,  spacious, 
bright,  parking  and  laundry.  Call  310-279- 
1667. 

WEST  L.A. 

Large  unfurnished  or>e  bdrm  $600.  Mini 
blinds,  ceiling  fans,  stov^refrlgerator,  new 
paint  UCLA  but  line.  3637  Scpulvcda  Blvd 
Apt.  #5.  (Two  blocka  north  o(  Venice  Blvd) 
310390-5065. 

WEST  LA 

Single,  $595.  1 -person,  no  peU.  Full  kitchen. 
Carpets,  UlrHk,  parking  laurwiry,  2-mllet 
UCLA  By  appointment.  11321 
Mastachuiettt.  310-477.6750. 

WEST  LA.  10  minute*  to  UCLA,  big  !•  brl^L 
Low  move-In.  ?-bdmV2-bth,  Single  SMS  A 
up.  WASh^R/DRYER,  W.B.  nreplacc,  tec. 
alarm,  ROOFTOP  SPA  11221  Richland. 
476-3990. 


49  Apartments  for  Rent 


WESTWOOD 

2-BedroonV1-bath,  $1050.  Single,  $675. 
Great  location,  2  blocks  UCLA.  1  car  pok- 
ing. Available  July.  Dayi,  310-271-7S96. 
Evenings,  i  10-286^0980. 

WESTWOOD 

2bedroonr>/2bath.  $950  AND  UP.  TILE 
KITCHEN,  STEPDOWN  LIVING  ROOM.  UN- 
USUAL CHARM.  1-1/2  MILE  TO  UCLA  310- 
839-6294.»« 

WESTWOOD 

3-MINUTE  WALK  TO  CAMPUS,  security 
building,  high-ceiling  AJC,  fireplace,  inter- 
com, gated  garage,  no  pets.  BachelorAin- 
gle/single^loft/2-bedroom.  $550-51200. 
310-208-0732. 

WESTWOOD  424  LANDFAIR,  NEXT  Tt3 
UCLA  2-  and  3-bcdroom  apartments  avail- 
able for  summerAall.  Hardwood  floors,  bal- 
conies, laur^dry  room,swimming  pool.  Call 
310-459-1200. 

WESTWOOD 

Sumnr>er  housing.  522  Landfair.  ibOO/mo. 
Double  occuparx^.  IrKludes  cable,  gas,  wa- 
ter, trash.  Call  Keith,  310-794-371 1  or  Kerim, 
310^24-0757. 

WESTWOOD -Landfair.  1  or  2  females  to 
share  1 -bedroom  in  spacious  2-bedroom/l  .5- 
bath  townhouse.  Available  6/19-8/31.  Hard- 
wood floors,  parking.  $67S/month.  310-824- 
5564. 

WESTWOOD.  $1395.  3- bedroom/2. 5- bath 
town-apartnr>ent.  1.2  miles  near  UCLA  1615 
Greenfield  Ave.  310-459  6800. 

WESTVy«30D.  Ibdrm,  $1100.  2-bdrm, 
$1500.  New,  high  quality  luxury  building  2 
blocks,  south  of  Wilshire.  Balcony,  A/C,  Ja- 
cuzzi, marble  fireplace.  Call  Courtrwy,  310- 
4739998. 


WESTWOOD  VILLAGE 

Enormous  apartment.s  with  dining 
room,  balcony,  fireplace,  bIt-ins 
Pool,  gated  subterranean  parking, 

FREE  CABLE  TV. 
i Bedroom/ 1  Bath. ...  ...fTt)TiT$^  liOO 

2Bedroom/2Bath from  $l,30() 

691  LEVERING  AVENUE 
(310)  208-3647 


WESTWOOD.  DELUXE  1-BEDRM.  10- 
MINUTE  WALK  TO  UCLA  VIEW  APAR. 
TMENT,  QUIET  BUILDING.  AVAILABLE 
NOW.  $900.  11088  OPHIR  DR.  CALL  310- 
206-8881.  310-208-2655. 

WESTWOOD.  Taking  reservations  for  sum- 
mer and  fall.  2-bed/2-bath,  all  appliances, 
swimming  pool^acuzzi,  walk  to  IXTLA. 
$1200-1400.  Call  310-824-0633. 

WESTWOOD.  Walk  to  UCLA  Large  2- 
bdrrTv'2-balh.  From  $1 250-1 4S(ymonth.  Re- 
frigerator, stove,  VC,  fireplace,  gated  park- 
ing, rooftop  spa.  sun  deck.  51 2  Veteran.  310- 
208-2655. 

WESTWOOD/BtVHILLS/CENTURY  CITY  ad- 
jacerH.  Prime  location.  2-bedroom  $990, 
near  UCLMMJses/ofTtce^mall.  Large,  beauti- 
ful, carpets,  appliances,  laur>dry,  brigN,  din- 
ing, balcony,  private-garage,  quiet-building 
310  474-1172. 

WESTWOODA»RIME.    Acrost    UCLA    Con- 
trolled entry/parking.  Full  kitchen,   l-bdrnm, 
$800-900,  2-bdrnrts,  $1200-1300.  Taking  re* 
ervation*  for  summer  and  fall.  445  Larnifair. 
310-624-1969. 

WLA 

$600.  Butler  and  Santa  Monica  Blvd.  1  -bed- 
room, kitcherx/dinm^  stov^refngerator,  park- 
ing, laundry,  2-miles  from  UCLA,  blue  bus. 
Convenient  location.  310-4523622. 

WLA  LARGE  2BDRM 

WLA  $800  and  up.  Large  2bdrm  *}  3/4 
bath.  Seperate  dining  room.  No  pets.  816- 
703-8248. 

WLA  $1500.  Large  3bdrnV2  full  bath  house. 
Nice  yard.  310-620-1561. 

WLA  l-BDRM 

$62S/nrwnth.  Move-in  boruis,  first  month  free. 
Good  ktcation,  parking,  laurviry  room, 
stovcAridge,  security  building.  1530  Gran- 
ville.   310-453-4009. 

WLA 

2  bdrrrVI  .S-bth,  $950+security,  gated  co 
mmunily,  mini-view,  upper  unit,  bullt- 
ins/custom  closet,  pool/]acu2zi,  tennis  court, 
remote  garage.  213872-1952,  310^202- 
1675.  Ask  for  Percy. ■ 

WLA 

Special  move-in  rales,  2-bedroom,  A/C,  Fire- 
place, galed-parking  and  entry  In  quiet-bulM- 
ing  15-min  ffom  UCLA  or  SMC.  3414  Jas- 
mine. Call  lor  details  310^836-1360. 


WLA-$620 


BELOIT  AND  OHIO.  1 -BDRMS  available, 
$620.  Verticals  and  covcred-parklr^g,  laun- 
dry, no  peU,  310-477-3316.  Singles,  $5m, 
310-477-5472. 

WLA  1-bed  $800-850,  Single  $635.  Security 
building,  parking,  air,  pooC  \aiundrY,  1/2-mlle 
to  UCLA,  dote  to  bus.  1450  Midvale.  31  a 
391-2874, 


49  Apartments  tor  Rent 


49  Aporfmenfs  for  Went 


Sammev  Housing  Help 


out  Our  FREE  Services 


Summ 

Suble 

Just 


^iSf^.^ 


Come  see  us  in  Sproul  Hall  Annex 
826-4491 

UCLA  Community  Housing  Office 


V^LA-MELROSE  PLACE? 

WLA  Huge  2-bdrm/2-bath,  $950;  large 
bachelor  $499.  Swimming  pool,  sundcck, 
lauryiry,  barbecue,  appliarxics.  Melrose  Place 
look-alikel  1621  Wcslgate.  310-820-1121. 

WLA  $815/month.  2-bcdroom/1-bath  up- 
per, nice  view,  north  of  Santa  Monica.  Close 
to  UCLA,  shopping.  Bright,  nice  neighbor- 
hood, greenery.  Stove,  refrigerator,  balcony, 
new  decor.  Laundry,  parking  1  444  Barry  #5. 
310-264-0678. 

WLA  $45(Vmo,  bachelor  near  Santa  Moni, 
ca^undy.  Carpets,  drapes,  refrigerator,  laun- 
dry, no  pets.  Available  June  1st  310-822- 
6487. 

WLA  BACHELOR  $475.  Close  to  campus, 
pool,  laurviry,  refrigerator,  clean.  1330  S. 
Barrington.  Day*:  310-451-0693,  evening: 
310-473  4989.  ^ 

WSTWD  SINGLE 

One-minute  to  UCLA.  SINGLE,  $625.  Fur- 
nished, unfurnished,  laundry,  pool.  Parking 
$60/nx>.  310-206-2820. 

WSTWD  VILLAGE 

MIDVALE  N.  or  LEVERING.  EXTRA  LARGE 
U2  BDRMS,  BALCONY,  DINING  ROOM,  3 
CAR  PARKING,  CHARMING,  GARDEN 
APTS.     310-639-6294 


50  Apartments,  Furnishied 


MAR  VISTA  $500-$60(Vmonth.  Ask  about 
free  rent  Attractive,  singlc/1 -txirm.  Large, 
pool,  patio,  barbecue  area.  Quiet  building 
3748  InglewDod  Blvd.  3ia3984t579. 

WESTWOOD.  $895.  Extra  large  1  bedroom, 
walk  to  school  and  village.  Available  July  2. 
729  Cayley.  310-20641798. 

WESTWOOD.  Large  single,  $725,  walk  to 
school  ar>d  village.  Available  June  21st.  667- 
669  Levering  Ave.  310^206  32  IS. 

WLA$57S/mo.  Ask  about  free  rent. 
Attractive  singles.  Near  UCLA/VA.  Ideal  (or 
students.  Suitable  for  two.  Quiet  building 
1525  Sawtelle  81.  3ia477-4832. 


51  Apartments,  Unfurn. 


CULVER  CITY-$875 

Large,  quiet,  rrtodern  2bdrm/2ba.  Patio,  dish- 
washer, refrigerator,  gated  parking.  310-837. 
0761. 

MOVE-IN  SPECIAL 

CHEVIOT  HILLS  ADJACENT.  $895.  Close  to 
campus.  Large  2-bdrrrV2-ba  in  security  txjild- 
ing.  Fully  loaded,  all  amenities.  }ia836- 
6007  or  310-376-8794. 

WEST  HOLLYWOOD 

Huge,  bright  2.bdmV2-ba,  dining.  Fireplace, 
laundry,  carport.  Fountain  Crescent  Heights. 
1-year  lease.  Available  r>ow.  $100(Vmo.  310- 
436-9635,  310-433-9605. ^ 

WLA  $695.  2-bdrm/1.5  ba,  dishwasher,  A^, 
beautiful  carpet,  drapes,  built-irw,  balcony, 
high  vaulted  ceiling.  310-670-5119,  310- 
391  7779. > 

WIA$695.  2  BtDAUNNY  UPPER.  CLOSE 
to  UCLA.  Gated,  south  facing  balcony,  new 
carpetA>aint.   Brockton,  310-390-4610. 


52  Apartments  to  Share 


$425  PALMS 

Own  room^ath  in  2-be<V2  bath  apartment. 
All  amenities  irKluded,  including  parking. 
$425/n>a.  -f  security  deposit.  Call  Ken  31  a 
615-9497. 

BRENTWOOD.  Master  bedroom  and  bath 
available  in  large  3  bdrnV2  ba  w/only  arte 
housemate.  $47(ymonth  >1/2  ulilitiet.  310- 
826-9117,  Sam. 

PALMS.  Must  see.  Own  bdrnVbath.  Modem 
glas^irrors.  Black  chronw.  High  celling*. 
Hug*  pkaure  windo«vs.  Pool,  bar.  Security. 
Extras.  $425/monlh.  310  204  3177. 

WILSHIRE.  HIghrise,  19th  floor.  Spectaculv 
view.  Own  *mall  bdrrM>ath.  Pool,  Jacuzzi, 
tauna,  parking  available.  $46(Vmonlh.  Walk 
to  iXXAi.  310-474-5093. 


53  Roommates 


424  KELTON.  N/S,  Clean  male.  Share  bed 
room,  largf  2+2  apt.  Quiet,  socurtty  building 
w/pool,  Jacuzzi.  $4(X)+  1/4  ulililics.  310-824- 
2293. _^ 

BEVERLY  HILLS 

Own  room  in  2-bedroorVl -bath  beautiful 
apartment.  Lovely  tree  lined  street,  high  ceil- 
ings, lots  of  windows.  $50(Vmonth.  N/S.  310- 

825  6865,  310-772-0432. 

BEVERLY  HILLS,  Tve  rent  in  exchange  for 
minor  housekeeping  and  chore*.  Female  pre- 
fcrred.  310-289-1404  leave  mcMage. 

BRENTWOOD.  N/S,  malc/fcmalc  profession- 
al/grad  Uudent  to  share  large  apartment.  Se- 
cured building  W/D,  fireplace,  deck,  p«k 
inn.  $450  >^utilities.  t^o  pets.  310-620-5534. 
BRENTWOOD.  T¥»»d  roommates  looking TorT 
third  to  share  large  3-bcdroorTV3-bath  apart- 
n^nt.      Laundry.      No     security      deposit. 
$S17/mo.  310-207-1747. 

HILGARD  AVE.  Summer  and  Fall,  female 
students.  Large  house,  rooms  to  share,  T.V., 
kitchen  laurxiry,  housekeeper.  Mrs..  Sola! 
310  208^8931. ^^ 

MARINA  DEL  REY,  roommalt  warited  to 
share  2bd  townhouse.  Prefer  grad  student  or 
older.  Male  or  female.  $725/mo.  Available 
now  Call  Brian  3ia822  1312. 

NEED  RMMATE  NOW 

LISTEN  TO  ROOMMATE  ADS  ONLINE 
Roomate    Services    900-644-7666.    1.89/.89 

for  quick  and  easy  listings  in  your  area. 

PACIFIC  PALISADES    Own  room  in   2-bed 
roonV2-bath.     2-storics,     hardwood     fkx>r*, 
french  doors,  parking  washer/dryer.  N/S  fe- 
male. $60(^T>onth.  MU^  SEtl  Jennifer,  310- 
459-0042. 

ROBERTSON/PICO  AREA.  Own  room  in  2- 
bedroorrVl -bath.  $380^7mnth  plus  utjll(ic*. 
Water    included.  Near  stores    and  but.    5-7 

miles  to  UCLA  31  a  559  5962. 

SANTA  MONICA.  Female  music  student 
wanted  to  share  condo.  Own  bedroom 
w/piarw.  Fumished  w/privale  bath.  $55(ymo, 

including  utilities.  310829-4667. 

VENKIE.  Nice  area,  female  preferred  to  share 
2>1  house  w/22-year  old  female.  W/D.  Hard 
wood  floors,  own  phone.  $50Q/month.  31  a 
822-1166. 

VENKHTMDR.  Hou*e,  nice  neighborhood,  1- 
block  from  beach.  2  rooms  open,  3  decks, 
hot  tub,  huge.  W/D,  garage  $62S/mo.  31  a 
823-2785. 

WESTWOOD.  Female  N/S  roommate  want 
ed.  Share  2-bedroom  2-story  apartment.  Own 
room.  Parking,  laundry,  hardwood  floors, 
surtdeck,  $60i^nrmnlh  ♦  half  utilities.  310- 
479^461. 

WESTWOOD.  N/S  female  roommate  to  shve 
spacious  1 -bedroom  (or  upcoming  school 
year.   Security,   clean,  quiet,    pool,  parking. 

jAOO/mo.  Mary.  3ia824-480e. 

WESTWOOD.  Share  spacious  Ibdrm  apt, 
walk  to  carppus,  law  student  preferred,  dis- 
count for  tutoring  Short  term  ok.  Call  Mike, 
310  2090966. 

WESTWOOD.  Shve  spacious  1  bdrrr^l  bath 
apartment  in  University  apart  nr>ents.  Security, 
A/C,  fumished.  Female.  $437.S(ymo.  Avail- 
able nanM.  Close  to  Campus  Expresa.  310- 
206-1665. 

WLA    Share   2-bedroom   apartmertt.  private 
bath.    $42S4^ililies.    Non.«moking    lem^lrs 
only,  must  be  clean.  Quiet  area.  Nea'  KILA. 
Available  knntediately.  Gated  security    JIO-' 
559-5274. 

WIA  Two  rooma  available,  $38S  and  $365. 
Share  bathroom,  femalea  preferred,  N/S.  310- 
390-7369,  evcninR*. 


54  Room  for  Rent 


BEVERLY  HILLS 

Onm  room  in  2-bedroom  apartment.  Female. 
Eitceilcnt  area.  Near  tranaportalion. 
$4S(yifTwnth.  ParkJnK.  310-656-6066. 

BRENTWOOD  LUXURY.  Hi^  private  bath- 
room. Furnished,  mini-kitchen,  private  en- 
trance, hardwood  floor*,  cable,  nmar  bus  and 
campu*.  Easy  parking.  N/S.  310-472-4419. 


26    Tuesday,  May  23, 1995 


Daily  Bruin  Classified 


54  Room  (or  Rent 


CHINESE  DISTRICT 

ALHAMBRA.YOU  ARE  CHINESE/VOU   want 

ri     Chinese     home.  1 -masterfoedroom, 

S65(V$325  Ur  thare.      Lthared   tingle    for 

$250.  Call:81&-576-2786.   Available-July  1 . 

LA.  Near  Robertson.  Room  for  rent  in  A-bdnn 
house.  1-roonrV$37S'^-t-1/4  utilities,  irKlude  all 
house  privileges.  Home:  310-836-8774, 
work:  213-265-3503. 

NEXT  TO  MURPHY 

WESTWOOO.  Rooms  in  house.  Quiet,  noty- 
smoking  female  preferred.  Private-bath,  kitch- 
en, WashA^ry,  yard,  parking.  $475  &  $500. 
310-279-1436.  

SM  -$390/mo./OBO 

4bd/3ba  house  wA^UCE  living  room,  den.  8- 
minutes  to  UCLA.  Near  buses.  Non-smoking 
"male  preferred.  Call  h^an  •  310-207-3212. 

WEST  HOLLYWOOD.  Furnished  room  for 
rent.  Female  preferred.  $35C^month,  utilities 
included.  21 3-876-1 626. 


WESTWOOO,  LARGE  ROOM,  private  balh, 
private  entrance,  furnished,  kitchenette,  clos- 
et. Close  to  UCLA.  $50(Vnr>onth.  310-826- 
8588  am.  or  470-3616  om^. 

WLA:  $350/MONTH 

Male  graduate  student.  Furnished  bedroom  in 
private  house.  Quiet  for  studying.  Mi- 
crowave, refrigerator,  r>ear  bus.  Weekly 
cleaning.  310-270-4387. 


55  Sublet 


1  SPACIOUS  BEDROOM  for  1/2  females. 
Furnished  2bed/2bath,  6/18-801.  Walk  to 
campus.  Central  air,  pool/spa,  laundry,  2 
parking  spaces.  $325/person.  Call  Kimberly 
310-824-2177.    

1 -BEDROOM  SUBLET,  totally  furnished. 
1651  Veteran.  1-mile  to  UCLA.  Hardwood 
Floors,  parking,  spacious.  Available  6/1 5- 
9/13.  $75(VmQnih.  Call  Dan;  310-825-9505. 

2-BED/2-BATH.  Close  walk  to  campus,  Mid- 
vdlc/Kodchester.  Furnished,  luxurious  apt. 
w/fircplace  and  balcony.  Roof-top  pool  and 
spa.  2  parking  spaces.  Best  offer.  Call  310- 
479  7513. 

2-BEOROOM/2-BATH.  Spacious,   hardwood 

floor,       brightly      lit,_    parking      available. 

_L140^month.  July  l4i--^lember  liL  310- 

824-1212. 

5-MINUTES  FROM  CAMPUS.  1-2  roommates 
needed.  2-bed,  2-bath.  Huge  balcony,  water, 
parking.  $400- 500.  Call  3ia208-5902. 

679  CAYLEY.  Need  2  people  for  1  of  2  bed- 
room furnished  apartnrterH.  Parking,  water, 
cable  irxrluded.  Great  locationi  Mid-June- 
August.  $375ea/monlh.  310-208-5005. 

AMAZING  WESTWOOD.  Wanted:  Up  to  4 
sublclters  for  clean  and  bright  2-bc(V1-bath 
LarvJfair  Apt.  Hardwood  floors,  patio,  park- 
ing. $34S/pcrsor\/month.  Available  July  1st. 
Call  Kevin  310-794-3461. 

ATRIUM  COURT  APT.  2-bed  and  bath,  j a 
cu22'\,  gym/weight  room,  A/C,  extra  parking. 
Fully   furnished.    $135(Vmo,  or   share.  6/19- 
9/19.  Jason  310-209-6003. 


AVAILABLE  NOW! 

WLA.    Large  room,    huge   living   room,    fi 
nished/unfumished.  Clean  arxi  quiet.  Parking 
laundry.  $375/month.  310-479-0765. 

BRENTWOOD,  1 -bdm>  in  2-bdrnV1-ba,  fully, 
furnished,  bright  apt.  ShareAingle.  Available 
e/2a9/30.     Pool/laundry,     sundeck,     living 
room     w/guest      couch.      Shared      kitchen. 
%520/mo.  incl.  util.  310-471-1320. 

FML  NEEDED  to  share  LRC  bdrm  from  mid 
June-mid  Sept  5  mis  from  LICLA,  pool,  VC, 
balcony.  $22S/nrrth.  PIz  call  3ia262-6851. 
Lg.  1  -brdnVI  -ba,  wet  bar,  parking.  1  -BIk  from 
campus.  Wer>dy/|cssica  209-0262.  Best  offer. 

LUXURY  APT. 

WESTWOOO.  New,  security  building.  Spa- 
cious apartment.  2-bdrm,  2-bath.  2  parking 
spots.  Alarm,  microwave.  2  balconies,  french 
doors.  Comer  Cayley^elton.  Price  ncgoti- 
able.  310-209-1195. 

MALE  SUBLETTER  NEEDED.  2-bedroo»T>/2- 
bath  apartmerH.  Close  to  campus.  Roof-top 
pool,  Jacuzzi.  Fully  furnished.  $30(Vmo.  irv 
eluding  utilities.  Available  6/1-801.  Jeff  or 
Thanh,  3ia208-0264. 

NEAR  SANTA  MONICA  AND  BUNDY.  Own 
room  in  2-bdrnV2-bath.  Close  to  bus  line. 
S35(Vmonth.  Share  with  quiet  graduate 
student.  3iaB2a5342. 

OLYMPIC  &  ROBERTSON.  6/23-9/6.  2- 
bdrnVI-bth,  2-car  garage.  U7S/mo.  Kim, 
310657-2105. 

RANCHO  PARIC  Furnished  bdmi/bth  in 
large,  sunny  2-bdrm  apt.  free  parking/cable. 
2-miles  from  campus,  on  buslirw.  Avail.  June 
10- Sept  10,  $48S/mo.  Chris.,  310  475  8967. 

ROOMS  AVAILABLE  in  huge  3-bedroom  on 
Veteran.  $450-$7SO  per  room;  end  of  June-- 
Sept.  1st.  Kim,  3ia206-3710. 

SANTA  MONICA,  5th  Street.  2  bedroom 
house  w/backyard.  Close  to  beach.  Parking. 
$80Q^month,  mid-June  thru  CfMi-August.  Call 
310  399-8897. 

SANTA  MONICA.  Grant/Lincoln.  Furnished 
studio.  5  blocks  to  beach.  Mid  June  thru  mid- 
September.  $4S(Vmonth.  Call  310-45a2856. 

SUBLET  WANTED:  Magazine  seeks  sublet  for 
male  summer  intern.  Own  room,  prefer  own 
balh,  furnished.  Call  Virginia  or  Nick,  310- 
391.2245. 

SUBLETTERS  NEEDED  LATE  JUNE  TO  MID- 
Seplembcr.  $1400/nrKxith.  2-singles,  1 -dou- 
ble. Spacious,  hardwood  floors.  Three  park- 
ing spaces.  Call  310-209-1975  lor  more  irv 
formation. 


55  Sublet 


SUMMER  SUBLET 

WLA.  1 -bedroom  apartment  available  now 
through  September.  10-minutes  from  cam- 
pus, beach.  On  busline  01.  $40(Vnionth  in- 
cludes  utilities.  310-820-0649. 

SUMMER  SUBLET.  Across  from  campus.  1  2 
people  in  security  building.  ASAP.  $338.  June 
free.  Dave  or  Ben  310-209-0179,  818-363- 
1889. 

SUMMER  SUBLET.  Up  to  2  females.  July- 
Aug.  Spacious  2-bed/2-b»th,  balcony,  park- 
ing, pool,  and  spa.  5-min.  to  campus. 
$32S/nrKi/person/obo.  310-208-4649. 

SUMMER  SUBLET.  Very  spacious  2-bedroom 
duplex,  fully  furnished,  hardwood  floor,  se- 
curity area.  Silver  Lake.  (Sur>set  Blv(VSih/er 
Lake  BlvtVlOl  freeway).  Close  to  shopping 
centers.  Also  ideal  for  Hollywood  &  Down- 
town iffterrtships.  $489-1  person,  $548  total' 
2  people/month  ■>■  utilities.  21 3-663-891 2. 

SUMMER  SUBLET:  1  block  from  campus,  2- 
bc(V2-bath.  Study  room,  quiet,  furnished. 
Available  mid-June  through  August.  310-471- 
3833. 

SUMMER  SUBLETS 

5-minutes  to  campus.  July- September.  1  to  3- 
bcdroom  apartments  starting  at  $90(Vmonth. 
Laundry  and  parking  available.  310-471- 
4787. 

WESTWOOD 

Female  roommate  wanted  ASAP.  2-bdmV1- 
bath.  Share  master  bedroom.  No  deposit 
$30(Vmonth.  May- August  free  cable  and  1/4 
utilities.  Karen  310-209-8240. 

WESTWOOO  SUBLET  from  mid-June  to  mid- 
Sept,  (flexible).  2-bedroonVl -bath,  balcony, 
hardwood  floor,  spacious,  parking,  1  -mirxiie 
walk  to  campus.  $350  persorVW>on(h-4 
spaces  or  whole-$127SAnonlh.  Call  310-794- 
5004  or  310-794-3784. 

WESTWOOD  SUBLET.  1 -bedroom  available 
in  2-bedn>om  apartment  Fully  furnished, 
parking,  spacious.  5-minutcs  to  campus. 
Ophir/GlenRock.  June  19-mid  Sept, 
$42  5/month.  Josh  824- 1 4  S3. 

WESTWOOO  Summer  sublet.  Female  to 
share  a  spacious  orw  bedroom  apartment 
Parking.  Price  negotiable.  310-209-3309. 
V^^STWOOD  SUMMER  SUBLET.  Male  need- 
ed for  great  location  at  403  LarwJfair. 
$35Q^obo.  Contact  Doug:  310-824-7076. 
WESTWOOD  SUMMER  SUBLET:  2-bed- 
roonV2-bath,  A/C,  2  secure  parking  spaces, 
Jacuzzi,  cleani  1 -minute  to  campus.  Avail- 
able mid-June  to  erwi-August  $137S^Tw>nth. 
310208-1627. 

VyaSTWOOD  SUMMER  SUBLET:  Female  to 
share  bedroom  in  2-be(V2-bath.  Fully  fur- 
nished luxury  apartment  w/pool,  Jacuzzi, 
parking.  $325/mo.  July  and  August  65S  Kef- 

ton  Ave.  310-824-1025. 

WtSTWOOD-679  GAYUY,  NEW  SECURfTY 
building.  Close  to  campus.  Need  1 -female 
to  share  room  i/1 9-8/30.  $425.  Call  Elc- 
na:31 0^24-2011. . 

WESTVVOOO.  1-2  people  to  share  spacious, 
modem  2-bedroorrV2-bath  aparirr>ent.  Laurv 
dry,  parking  poolApa.  ^7-V31. 
$325/W>onth,  June  free.  DeposM  $375.  Oia- 
noe,  310-824^7585. 

WESTWOOD.  2  females  needed  to  share  one 
master  bedroom  in  a  2-bedroanfV2-bath 
nt  Fully  furnished  irxluding  kMchcrw 
ware.  Security  buildir^  «W|pool.  5-mirHjic 
walk  to   canr«pus.    $30(VmantJ^3ersan.   Call 

310-209-1 386  Of  310-8243565.. 

WESTV^^OOO.  3  (emalc  roommates  newled. 
2bdrm/2bath.  Spacious  living  room,  refrigera- 
tor, stove,  microwave,  dishwasher,  security, 
balcony,  gated  parking.  Clenrock/Ophir.  Late 
June- Aug  31st.  Joy  310824-9688. 

WESTWOOO.  3  spaces  available  in  2bdrm, 
2bath  apartment.  1/2-mile  to  campus. 
$32S/nr>onth  4l/4  utilities  each.  Available 
June  17  August  31.  310-209-0623. 

WESTWOOO.  FEMALE  ROOMMATE  NEED- 
ED ASAP  for  July  arxi  Au^Mt  in  Tiverton 
Court.  $275/month.  Share  room  In  2-bed- 
room  apartment  310-824-1911. 

WESTWOOD.  Female  roommate  needed. 
Summer  and  school  year.  1-bdrm.  2-room- 
mates.  Close  to  UCLA.  Rent  $300  negotiable. 
Call  Laryssa  206-5025. 

WESTWOOO.  Gorgeous  2-bdrm  apvtment 
rwar  campus  rweds  up  to  3  (emates  to  share 
for  summer.  Parfcirtg  available.  Call  206- 
8690. 

WESTWOOD.  Large  3  bdrrTv^  ba,  living 
room.  Dining  room,  kitchen  w/dishwasher,  3- 
ipace  parking,  laundry  services,  unfur- 
nishcdAumished.  443-1/2  Midvale. 

$200Q/n'K}.  Contact  Colin,  310-794-4602. 

WESTWOOO.  tftrge  single  to  sublet  July 
&  August.  1-b(ock  from  canr>pus.  Furnished, 
no  utilities.  Pool,  laundry.  $47SAno.  Call: 
310-824-4987. 

WESTWOOO.  Sublet  1  -bdrm,  gated  parking 
space,  furnished,  pool,  laundry,  VC.  Water, 
gas,  ekictricity.  Avail.  July  1  -Sept  1 5. 
$81G/nr>o  ($405  ea.  for  2).  310-443-8948. 

WESTWOOO.  Sublet  Available  June-August 
Or>e  spot  to  share.  Female  Only,  N/S.  3- 
minutes  to  campus,  parking  ir>cluded.  Ask  (or 
Anne,  310206-2387  or  leave  nwssaxe. 

V^A.  Lar^  furnished  2-bcdroorTV3-bath. 
Parking,  2-bfocks  from  bus.  $64<Vnv>nth  obo 
(-«-  utilities).  Available  ^5-9/15.  Call  310- 
826-9654  or  ]^10-442-52n. 


WLA/BRENTWOOO.  Master  bedroom,  own 
bath  in  3bdrm  apartnwnt  Jurw-Aug^pt 
Walking  distance  to  bus.  Pavilions.  $500  -f 
ulilHics.  310-477-6431. 


56  House  for  Rent 


CULVER  CrrY.  3-BEOROOMr2-8ATH,  fami- 
ly room,  hardwood  -  floors,  Jacuzzi. 
$140(VVnonlh.  310-836-3646. 


57  House  to  Stiore 


3-BDRM  TO  SPLIT 

WESTWOOD  HOUSE.  Own  roonVbath  and 
use  of  guestroonVofTice  w/computer.  Furni- 
ture available,  laur>dry,  fireplace,  dishwasher, 
security,  yard.  $65(Vmonth.  Jody,  310-471- 
8031.^ 

WLA  GREAT  FIND 

Newer  2  story  4bdrnV3bath  house,  new  car- 
petVpaint/yards,  fireplace,  A/C.  Largp-kitch- 
en.  Quite  setting.  Cable,  4  miles  to 
UCLA/beach.  310-820-8132. 


58  House  for  Sole 


5-BEDROOM,  $475K! 

SfWita  Monica  Adjacent  Huge  S-bedroonV3- 
bath,  two  master  suitesi  Family  room,  hard- 
wood floors,  marble  bath,  great  rwighbor- 
hoodl  310-312-1476. 

DREAM  HOUSE 

CULVER  CITY.  3■^1.  $214,000.  Beautifully 
upgraded  arvi  renradeled.  Hardwood  floors, 
double  garage.  Prudential  California  Realty. 
Agent  310-827-5512. 

FACULTY/STAFF-  Live  in  beautiful  Manhat- 
tan Beach,  'tree  section'  charmer.  Safe,  nice 
r>eighborhood,  top  schools,  3-bdrrr^-bath 
■fden.  Wood  floor,  skylight,  r>ew  roof,  2-car 
garage.  Private  patio,  gazebo,  beautiful  gar- 
dens. Must  see  to  appreciate.  $435,000. 
Agent,  310-545-1948. 

GREAT  DEAL!! 

SANTA  MONKWSUNSET-PARK.  2-bdrm 
-KierV2-ba  or  3-bdrm/2-ba.  Separate  dining- 
room.  Remodeled  kitchen.  2-car  garage. 
$305,000.  2522  30lh  Street.  310-393-1795, 
714-597-0938. 


59  House  Exctiange 


HOUSE  EXCHANGE,  ^8-7/1 7  approx- 
imately. Wonderful  Victorian  home  wAwim- 
ming  pool.  3-bdrm/2-bath.  1-mile  from  the 
beach  in  beautiful  southwest  of  England. 
310-442-9493. 


62  Room/Board  for  Help 


BRENTWOOD.  Male  student  only.  Guest- 
house in  exchange  for  10  hoursMeek  tutor- 
ing high  school  Chemistry  and  Spanish,  plus 

errands.  310-472-2628. 

FREE  TO  MALE  STUDENT  in  exchange  for 
help,  no  drugs,  available  weckervis  and 
evenings,  small  private  room.  La  Brea/Venice 
in  Mid-city  area.  213-936-3349. 

FRYMAN  CANYON.  Room/Board  -►  $5(VWk 
in  exchange  for  20  hrVwk  babystting,  late  af- 
tcmoorVeariy  evening.  Must  have  own  car. 
Jennifer,  310-273-0467. 

HOUSEMOTHER 

Westwood.  Live-in.  Lovely  senior  retirement 
residence.  24-hour  light  duties  in  exchange 
(or  room,  board,  small  salary.  310-826-3545. 

TEACH  CHINESE? 

Housekeeping/childcare  for  7-year-old  boy  in 
Beveriy  Hills.  Private  roon^uth.  Approx- 
imately 20fhrVwk.  Salary  negotiable.  Fe- 
male,  own  car.  310-273-8568. 

WESTWOOO.  Room  artd  Board  in  exchange 
for  after-school  child  care.  Walk  to  UCLA, 
start  summer  or  falL  310-47S-1 297. 


63  Sailboats  for  Rent 


ESCAPE-TO-THESEA.  Live-aboard  small  fur- 
nished sailboat  Cool  ocean  breezes.  Full-se- 
curKy.  Microwave,  refrigerator,  telephorw- 
capability.  Marina  bathroorra/ihowers,  1(X)-ft 
away.  $37Vnr>o.,  includes  Uilities.  310-827- 
0497. 


65  Towntiouse  for  Sole 


3+2.5+BONUS  RM 

WIA.  Bike  to  UCLA.  Townhouse,  private  ga- 
rage, fireplace.  Fabulous  end  unit  I  $229,000. 
Prudential  Califomia  Realty.  AgerH.  310- 
827-5512. 


67  Condos  for  Sale 


Westwood  Condo 

Spacious  1-bdrnV2-ba.  2  security  parking 
spaces,  5-blocks  to  campus,  pool,  sauna, 
VC,  fteat,  24-hr  security  guard,  cable,  laurv 
dry,  appllar>ces,  balcony  view.  Please  call 
310-475-9231.  Must  seen 


69  Condos  for  Rent 


FAB  FURN  CONDO 

WESTWOOD.  Ibdrm.  Includes  utihies 
pool/jacuzzi/sauna/gym,  24hr  security  build- 
ing^arking.  $1100^10.  lease,  1440  Veteran. 
Avail.  June.  Pets  OK.  310-553-4227. 

SHERMAN  OAKS.  Bright,  spacfous,  2- 
bdrrr^-ba.  Pool,  Jacuzzi,  fireplace,  balcony, 
rec  room.,  gated  garage,  VC,  lop  floor,  large 
storage.  $1100Ano.  818-981-1607. 

WESTWOOO  ADJACENT.  $1100.  2-bdmV2- 
ba.  Fireplace,  balcony,  appliaiKCs,  pool,  fock 
building.  Sunny,  quiet.  310-553-6662. 


69  Condos  for  Rent 


WSTWD  CONDO 

1440  VETERAN.  1-bdrm  and  loli/1-bath. 
Available  June.  1-bdrm  and  1-bath  available 
September.  Security  parking.  Utilities  includ- 
ed. Pool,  spa,  gym.  Show  w/appointment. 
310-208-3387. 


71  Vacation  Rentals 


BEAUTIFUL  SPACKDUS  YOSEMITE  HOME 
SURROUNDED  BY  TALL  PINES.  CLOSE  TO 
EVERYTHING.  FULLY  EQUIPPED.  S'OOO 
ELEVATKDN.  DECK.  REASONABLE  RATES 
818^785-1028  X60303. 

House  in  Provence 

Rent  our  small  1 6ti>-century  house  w/garden 
In  Provence.  Near  Avignon.  Panaramic  views 
of  wine  country.  Superb  cycling,  maiketing, 
hiking.  310-477-6869.      ' 

IDYLLWILD 

BEAUTIFUL  ALL  YEAR  RETREAT.  FULLY 
equipped.  Fireplaces,  hot  tub,  sleeps  5+. 
Daily,  weekly,  monthly.  Call  Ernesto, 
Home:3 10-39 1-6808.  Work:825-257S. 


78  f\/lisc.  Activities 


AUDITIONS:  Vocalists  and  musiciarw  want- 
ed to  form  band  for  contemporary  Christian 
church  services  and  special  everUs.  310-202- 
8613. 


91  Insurance 


MOTORCYaE/MOTORSCOOTER  IN- 

SURANCE. Great  rates.  Personal  Service. 
MastercarcVVisa  accepted.  Call  for  quick 
quotes.  C.  Diamond  Insurance  310-428- 
4995. 


=^1  Insurance 


Allstate 

Insurance  Company 
(310)312-0204 

1317  Westwood  Blvd. 
(2  biks.  So.  of  Wilshire) 


92  Legal  Advice 


L^andlord  Problems'? 

RepsLlrs  Needed'? 

Carpets'?     Painting? 

Oeposit  ReturneciV 

Paralegal  Help  C^heapl 

Free  Consialtation 

'    ^3xo)  oso-oooe 

3P1VI    -    f5PIS/I 


94  Movers/Storage 


BEST  MOVERS  Splece  special  as  k>w  as 
$68.00.  No  job  too  small.  24ft  truck.  Call  us 
first  T-1 63844.  213-263-2378,  213-263- 
BEST. 

HONEST  MAN.  W/14ft  truck  ar>d  dollies, 
small  jobs,  short  ratice  ok.  Student  discourtt 
310-285-8688.  CA,  AZ,  NV.  Co  Bruins. 

^RRY'S  MOVING  &  DELIVERY.  The  careful 
movers.  ExperierKcd,  reliable,  same  day  de- 
livery. Packing,  boxes  available.  Jerry,  310- 
391-S6S7.  COUCLAII 

TOM'S  MOVING  SERVICE.  DEPENDABLE, 
EXPERIENCED,  REASONABLE.         LAST 

MINUTE  JOBS  WELCOME.  CALL  24  HRS. 
310-397-3607. 


•••••••••••••••••••••• 


TODAY'S 
CROSSWORD  PUZZLE 


ACROSS 

t  Steam  

^^6  Deeds 
10  Lug 

1 4  Wed  secretly 

15  Passenger 

16  Frosted 

1 7  Thorny  flowers 

18  Courage 

19  Floe 

20  Engagement 

22  Make  fun  of 

23  Zone 

24  Figured  out 
26  Youngster 

29  Twice  five 

30  Writer  Fleming 

31  Brainstorms 
33  Flourishes 

38  TV  part 

39  Bangs 

41  Song  in  an 
opera 

42  Less  lax 

44  Hauls 

45  Liquor  made 
from  sugar 
cane 

46  Dale's  partner 

48  Affirmative 

49  Mt.  St.  Helens 
or  Krakatau 

53  Comic  Johnson 

55  Beeper 

56  New  England 
and  New  York 

61  Pencil  mark 

62  Lose  cok>r 

63  Select  from 
the  menu 

64  Arden  and 
namesakes 

65  Tacks  on 

66  Sister's 
daughter 

67  Try  out 

68  Robin's  home 

69  Feel 


PREVIOUS  PUZZLE  SOLVED 


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2  African  lily 

3  Fence  support 

4  "Aida"or 
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5  Spas 

6  Coverlet 

7  -Killing  em 
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8  Perennial  p)lant 
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9  Tennis  match 
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1 0  Rome's  river 

11  Sea 

12  Succinct 

13  Trimmed 

21  Golfer's  peg  -^ 

22  Zip 

25  Heanng  organs 

26  Covers 

27  Mine  entrance 

28  Beloved 
32  —  Baba 


33  Sak>on 

34  —  de  cologne 

35  Paris  airport 

36  Cleopatra's 
river 

37  Impudent  talk 

39  Amaze 

40  Kind  of  stand 

43  Stuff 

44  Boas 

46  Hardest  to  find 

47  Morsel 

49  Type  of  parking 

50  —  branch: 
peace  token 

51  Highway 
divisions 

52  Peak 
54  Spooky 

57  At  —  (not  in 
agreement) 

58  Arabian  gulf 

59  Min.  divisksns 

60  Shade  giver 
62  Devotee 


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on  Vanica  Baaoh. 

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96  Services  Offered 


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Expert  database  learcKer  of  all  medical,  phar- 
maceutical, biotech,  ptychokiglcal  databaict 
•fmore.  Got   artick*  eapted  and  books  deHv 


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ATTN:  MBA,  LAW, 
MED.  APPLICANTS 

Frustrated  developing/editing  your  critically- 
important  personal  statements?  Get  profes- 
sional belp,  competitive  edge  from  national- 
ly-knosvn  author/consultant.  310-826-4445 

K  A  LICENSED  STOCKBRCXER  To  sell 
stocks,  bonds...  Work  full/part  time.  License 
course  available,  hto  prior  academic  requir*- 
ment.  213-462-0101. 

CALL  ME  NOWl  RESUMES,  THESES,  DIS- 
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writes, nuth  papers,  etc  Mar>y  years  experi- 
ence, stale  u(  art  equipment  Will  consider 
your  budget.  Plevecall  Michelle  Kohn,  213- 
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102  Music  Lessons 


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All  leveli^tyles  with  dedicated  professional. 
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Guitars  available.  Sam  310-826-9117. 


GUITAR  LESSONS  by  a  professional  ney 
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104  Resunnes 


WINNING  RESUMES 

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105  Travel 


EUROPE,  $249  o/w.  CARIBBEAN/MEXICO, 
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DMLT  BKUIN 
82S.2221 


Daily  Bruin  Sports 


Tuesday,  May  23, 1995    27 


Letter 


Save  Ed  O' 
from  the 
NBA  abyss 

The  NBA  Draft  Lottery  has 
ended  and  it's  official:  the  Los 
Angeles  Clippers  are  now  in  prime 
position  to  draft  Ed  O'Bannon.  I 
believe  I  shriek  for  all  concerned 
Bruins  when  I  bellow  the  follow- 
ing: NOOOO!!! 

Anyone  with  an  NBA  IQ  higher 
than  Jordan's  jersey  number  (what- 
ever it  is  this  week)  can  see  what  a 
suckhole  that  franchise  is.  The 
annals  abound  with  examples  of 
nice-enough  players  who  get  draft- 


ed into  the  circle  of  hell  that  is  the 
Sports  Arena  a^d  become  embit- 
tered jerks  punching  the  clock  until 
free  agency  can  deliver  them  to  a 
nice,  warm  place  to  revive  their 
careers.  Whither  Manning? 
Whither  Harper?  Remember 
Lamond  Murray? 

I  plan  to  circulate  a  petition 
around  campus  pleading  with  Bill 
Fitch  to  spare  Ed  O'Bannon  these 
Clippers-thumbscrews.  Sign  it!  Cut 
this  out  and  send  it  in  an  envelope 
with  "The  Briny  De^p  of  the  NBA" 
written  on  it  for  a  mailing  address. 
Believe  me,  the  Clips  will  get  it. 

Or,  better,  send  a  letter  of  your 
own.  Say,  "Mr.  Sterling:  How 
about  that  hot'-shootin'  Respert?!?" 
Or  maybe,  "Mr.  Fitch:  Don't  forget 
about  that  Stoudamire  guy.  I 


understand  he  was  Pac-IO  Co- 
Player  of  the  Year.  And  he  always 
comes  up  big  in  big-game  situa- 
tions. Fly  him  in  to  take  a  look 
around;  hey,  fly  his  dad  In,  too!" 

It  would  be  wonderful  to  see  Ed 
O'  play  in  L.A.  But  if  a  trip 
through  Sterling's  sleazy  tar  trap 
would  make  the  classiest  player  in 
the  world  like  the  rest  of  the 
Clippers  (past  and  present),  it's  not 
worth  it.  Mr.  Fitch,  Mr.  Sterling: 
Ed  O'Bannon  would  only  get  in 
Loy  Vaught's  way!  Let  him  go  to 
the  Bullets,  the  Grizzlies,  the 
Globetrotters,  the  Yakima  Sun^ 
Kings.  Anywhere! 

Please  spare  Ed! 

Patrick  C.  Meighan 
Senior,  History 


105  Travel 


::fif^» 


^*,-.  -^ 


SUMMER 

AIRFARES 


'  Comprehensive  Servl(es 
'  free  Ticket  Delivery  on  campui 
Order  by  Phone 


London 


Paris 


Amsterdam 


Eurallpasses  issued 
on  the  spot! 

.•.,il,oui  !,('<'  ¥   (riijr'i  tf \'(iiii(iri\  (,(pl,  fif.d  ton  ts  not  twiuded 


/4SUCL4/ 


TRAVEL 


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It  Works  Wonders 
^American  Heart  Association 


109  Autos  for  Sale 


LOW  MILEAGE 

•93  MERCURY  TRACER.  4-<ioor,  lOK  miles, 
loaded,  automatic.  Original  o«wnef, 
SaOOCVobo.  310-842-8403. 


109  Autos  for  Sale 


PLYMOUTH  LASER 

"91  RS  MOOa.  16-v.  DOHC-wgine.  Power 

everything.  Includes  CO-player,  alarm.  Only 
SSKmiles.  Excellent  coryiilion,  1 -owner. 
S650(Vobo.  310-824-2997. 


VW  FOX,  white,  2-door,  1988,  4-speed, 
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ning  condition,  $2550.  213-883-1762. 

'85  HONDA  PRELUDE.  Charcoal  gray,  5- 
ipeed,  sunroof,  stereo,  new  tires,  brakes. 
Non-snwlting  owner.  1 1 2,000  miles.  Excel- 
lent  condition.  S3500  firm.  310-470-2035. 

'85  MITSUBISHI  TREDIA-L.  AUTO,  GOOD 
corxiition  w/ac  Low  mileage,  graduating  so 
mustselll    $1800.   310-479-4831. 

'86  FORD  MUSTANG  GT  CONVERTIBLE. 
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VC,  new  tires.  Great  graduation  carl 
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'87  TOYOTA  CELICA  Top  condition.  BIk. 
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115  Scooters  for  Sole 


1989  HONDA  ELITE  80.  Red,  low  miles,  nins 
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2717. 

'89  HONDA  aiTE  80.  White,  runs  great, 
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200-0264. 


126  Furniture  for  Sole 


BIG  BLOWOUT 

Desks,   chairs,   bookshelves,   couch,  every- 
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BLACK  LEATHER   sofa,    chair,  rediner,  and 
ottoman.  $1100.  31D-298-3280. 


FULL-SIZED  MATTRESS.  Perfect  condition. 
$50.  310-820-1615. 

MATTRESS  SETS:  Twin  $89,  Full  $99,  Queen 
$149,  King  $169,  Bunkbeds.  Deliveries, 
Phone  Orders  Accepted.  310-372-2337. 

REDUCED:  CREAM  LEATHER  SOFA.  $450. 
Oak  shelves,  $115.  New  Mountain  bike, 
$240.  310-274-4025. 

USED  QUEEN  SIZE  WATERBED.  Working 
heater.  $100.  Like  new.  310-375-6037. 


128  Misc.  for  Sale 


SLAVOPHILES:  For  sale    Soviet  era  posters 
and  other  objecU.   David  21 3-666-9960. 


129  Musical  Instfunnents 


MUST  SELL 

7.FT  GRAND  PIANO.  1927  MASON  HAM- 
LIN. Ebony.  Excellent  condition.  $14,000 
obo.  818-880-9081. 


134  Computer/Typewriter 


C386SSX,  5  1/4  and  3  1/2  floppy  drives,  BGA 
Colof  monitor,  Windows,  WP,  WORD. 
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MAC  CLASSIC 

4MB  RAM.  250MB  harddrive,  w/Deskwriter 
printer.  Includes  Microsoft  Word  w/original 
boxes.  Excellent  condition.  $600/obo.  310- 
824-2997. 

MACINTOSH  2Si.  Color  monitor,  Stylcwriter 
II  Laser  printer.  Brand  r>ew,  hardly  used. 
$1500/obo.  310-824-1301. 

POWERBCX3K  520  4-MB,  160  RAM  plus  Sty- 
lewriter  II  printer  for  $200(yobo.  Brand  new, 
in  Kood  condition.  Call  Gary  208-6746. 


CLASSIFIED  LINE  AD, 
GOOD. 


^i^ 


^ 


>^g'^$^i»*^^tt»^' 


CLASSIFIED  DISPLAY, 
LARGER  AND  BEHER. 


GET  YOUR 
MESSAGE  ACROSS. 

TO  PUCE  AN  AD,  Ull  206-3060 

■Daily  Bruin 


AAA6iC  C00t({€  B^R.$ 

1/2  eup  butter  or  margarine 

1  1/2  cup  graham  eraeker  crumbs 

1  14  oz.  can  of  sweetened  condensed  milk 

1  6  oz.  package  of  semi-sweet  chocolete  morsels 

1  1/2  cup  coconut  flakes 

1  cup  chopped  nuts 

Pre-heat  oven  to  350  degrees. 
/32S  degrees  if  using  a  $hsf  dish) 

In  a  13  X  9  inch  baking  pan,  melt  butter. 

Sprinkle  crumbs  over  butter  and  press  into  pan. 

Pour  condensed  milk  evenly  over  crumbs. 

Sprinkle  coconut  flakes,  chocolate  morsels,  and  nuts  over  this 

layer  and  press  down  firmly. 

Bake  25  to  30  minutes  or  until  lightly  golden. 

Cool  before  cutting  into  squares. 

Store  loosely  covered  at  room  temperature  or  in  refrigerator. 

Tina  Wong  can  pick  up  her  $10  at  the  Bruin  Gold  Office. 


28    TuMday,  May  23, 1995 


Daily  Bruin  Sporti 


il|tcri?at 

udent  Speci 

coiHureg 

Haircut  &  Blowdry 

1 

Kxp.  o/.il/9o 

Perm  &  Haircut 

^^^^*mm^^^^ 

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Color 

Spiral  Perm  &  Haircut 

1 

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1 

N19\\estwood  Blvd. 
h79.8625/^78-9516 

Schwarzkopi 

■■           CIX)Si:n  SUNDAYS 

Prices  For  First  Time  C  ients  On  \ 

breadstlks 


Your  Village  Grocer 

got  milli? 

yiSuulAen 

Half  Gallons 
foiiio.1^ 


(Ralphs  $1.75) 

Nonfat    $1.49 

(Ralphs  $1.71) 


Midnight  ^ 


Open  'til         

at  1057  Gayiey^ve, 


^1 


USAC  Presidential  Appointments 
and  Staff  position  applications 

sure  noiAf  available. 


Pick  up  your  applications  at: 

•304  Kerckhoff  Hall     •102  Men's  Gym     •337  Plaza  Building 


Due: 


Weds.  May  31, 1995 
by  5:09pni  at  394  Kerckhoff 


Find  out  what  you  can  do 


If  you  have  any  questions,  please  call  825-8545  or  stop  by  304  or  404  Kerckhoff  Hall 

Paid  for  by  USAC 


Kaci  Clark 


UCLA  Spofts  Into 


SOFTBALL 

From  page  32 

and  Iowa,  Southwestern  Louisiana 
and  Michigan  make  up  the  lower 
bracket  along  with  the  second- 
seeded  Bruins. 

UCLA  will  ope.fl  with  No.  7 
Iowa,  a  team  they  know  very  little 
about  but  are  taking  seriously 
because  of  its  victory  over  Fresno 
State  in  the  Regional  Hnal. 

"We  don't  know  anything  about 
Iowa,  but  they  have  instant  respect 
from  UCLA  because  they  beat 
Fresno,"  Enquist  said.  "Anytime 
you  can  beat  Fresno  in  May, 
you're  bona  fide." 

Though  the  Bruins  do  not  want 
to  take  Iowa  too  lightly,  it  is  hard 
not  to -look  forward  to  a  possible 
rematch  with  Michigan,  which 
handed  the  Bruins  their  first  loss 
of  the  season  in  the  UCLA 


Classic. 

"I  think  that  the  whole  team 
would  love  to  face  Michigan  again 
just  to  get  a  little  payback,  a  little 
revenge,"  Brundage  said.  "But 
right  now  we  are  concerned  with 
Iowa,  and  it  really  doesn't  matter 
who  we  play.  If  we  play  Michigan, 
that  will  just  be  extra  incentive  to 

win." 

•  •  • 

Brundage  is  focused  on  leading 
the  Bruins  to  another  national 
title,  but  after  hitting  the  20th 
home  run  of  her  career  to  break 
the  school  record,  it  was  hard  for 
the  Ail-American  not  to  take  a  lit- 
tle bit  of  pride  in  her  individual 
honors. 

"It  was  nice,"  Brundage  said. 
"When  I  was  running  around  the 
ba.ses,  I  kind  of  smiled,  but  after 
that  we  just  had  to  get  back  to  the 
game  and  what  our  purpose  of  the 
team  was." 


Daily  Bruin  Sports 


BILLIGMEIER 

From  page  32 

right.  But  the  fighting  shenani- 
gans kept  up  throughout  the  fall 
and  into  the  winter.  For  those  vio- 
lent types  out  there,  you  know 
what  I'm  talking  about  when  I 
mention  the  "urge"  -  it's  the  feel- 
ing a  demented  person  like 
myself  gets  every  now  and  then  to 
beat  the  living  daylights  out  of 
something.  For  me  personally, 
prior  to  meeting  Jason,  the 
"something"  had  all  to  often 
amounted  to  a  very  hard,  very  • 
not-amenable-to-a-human-fist 
4nanimate  object  -  walls,  ceilingSr 


McSorley  of  Los  Angeles  and 
Shane  Churia  of  the  Stars.  TTwr 


windshields,  the  works. 

But  once  Ja.son  came  to  town, 
and  especially  after  we  bought 
the  gloves,  the  urge  remedy 
became  a  human  one.  Now 
instead  of  breaking  my  fist  on 
stucco,  I  got  to  break  someone 
else's  face. 

At  least,  that  was  the  plan.  As  it 
turned  out,  it  was  mostly  my  body 
doing  the  breaking.  In  the  dozen 
or  so  occasions  on  which  we  used 
the  gloves,  he  pretty  much  handed 
me  my  lunch  (and  if  he  had  taken 
a  couple  more  kidney  shots,  I 
would've  upchucked  it  right  back 
to  him).  It  got  to  the  point  where 
one  good  right  hook  to  his  shoul- 
der and  I  was  in  celebration 
mode.  Of  course,  while  I  cele- 
brated, Jason  retaliated  by  break- 

(B)oxing  should 

probably  be  banned 

because  of  its 


/*• ' 


potential  to  wrealT 
such  havoc. 


ing^  couple  of  my  ribs. 

Obviously,  this  insanity  had  to 
stop  someday.  And  it  did,  after  I 
separated  a  couple  of  fingers  and 
he  sprained  his  wrist  (the  product 
of  connecting  with  my  rock-hard 
body,  I  would  assume).  This 
doesn't  necessarily  mean  the  urge 
is  gone  (nor  is  my  occasional 
desire  to  beat  Ja.son's  face  in),  it 
just  means  that  I've  returned  to 
inanimate  objects  once  again.  I'm 
trying  to  sticlc  with  pillows  and 
stuffed  animals,  but,  hey,  some- 
times those  damn  walls  just  pi.ss 
me  off. 

Anyway,  the  point  of  all  that  is 
not  to  scare  off  my  future  wife,  if 
she  so  happens  to  be  in  the  audi- 
ence today.  My  violent  nature 
should  not  frighten  anybody  - 
after  all,  if  I  can't  beat  up  a  wiry 
twig  like  Jason,  it's  hard  to 
believe  I  could  hurt  any  human. 

No,  the  point  is  more  to  explain 
my  innate  adoration  for  absolute,  ^, 
vulgar,  uninhibited  barbarianism. 
I  am  totally  fascinated  by  man's 
(not  to  be  sexist,  but  I  have  yet  to 
meet  a  woman  who  lives  and  dies 
with  the  career  of  George 
Foreman  -  and  by  the  way,  if 
you're  out  there,  what  are  you 
doing  Saturday  night?)  devotion 
to  violence,  framed  in  the  sports 
of  hockey,  football  and,  especial- 
ly, boxing. 

I  ab.solutely  adore  observing  all 
three  of  those  sports,  despite  the 
fact  that  I  realize  I  am  watching 
the  total  physical  destruction  of 
human  beings.  And  I  would  ven- 
ture to  guess  that  most  red-blood- 
ed American  males  (read: 
testosterone-overdosed  persons) 
love  the  primal  violence  involved 
in  sports  just  as  much  as  I  do. 

Take  professional  ice  hockey, 
for  instance.  Early  this  season, 
Jason,  a  few  other  friends  and  I 
went  to  the  Kings-Dallas  game  at 
the  Forum.  During  the  second 
period  of  an  otherwi.se  entertain- 
ing contest,  a  one-on-one  brawl 
erupted  between  the  "enforcers" 
of  the  respective  teams  -  Marty 


fight  went  for  a  good  30-45  sec 
onds,  McSofley  landing  a  couple 
of  grazing  blows  that  got  the 
crowd  into  a  tizzy,  and  Churia 
pretty  much  beating  the  tar  out  of 
McSorley 's  face.  Both  men  left 
the  ice  bloodied  and  physically 
spent,  to  the  utter  glee  of  seem- 
ingly all  16,000  fans  in  the  build- 
ing. 

(Jason,  for  instance,  reacted  to 
the  brawl  by  standing  up,  raising 
both  arms  and  bellowing,  "God,  I 
love  hockey!"  to  the  delight  of 
our  entire  section.) 

Why  do  I  think  like  this?  I 
^nno.  It's. probably  because  I'm 
a  guy  who,  when  God  was  hand- 
ing out  the  goods,  got  into  the 
hormone  line  a  few  too  many 
times. 

But  regardless  of  the  reason,  I 
do  love  violence  in  .sports,  at  least 
where  it  belongs.  Which  brings 
me  to  boxing.  There  is  no  reason 
for  the  sport  of  boxing  except  its 
beautifully  raw  violence.  Crowds 
of  thousands  pack  auditoriums  to 
watch  two  grown  men  rearrange 
each  other's  faces  like  cavemen 
settling  a  land  dispute.  It's  very 
barbaric.  And,  in  my  opinion,  it's 
very  cool. 

Excepts  that  is,  when  some- 
body dies  because  of  it.  Dying,  in 
my  opinion,  is  very  not  cool. 
Especially  when  it  happens  to 
someone  like  Jimmy  Garcia,  the 
promising  twentysomething  light- 
weight whose  brains  were  turned 
to  mush  by  Gabe  Ruelas  a  couple 
weeks  back.  Garcia  collapsed  into 
unconsciousness  after  his  "fight" 
(I  could  think  of  a  more  appropri- 


Tuesday,  May  23, 1995    29 


ate  title  -  "one-sided  thrashing;; 
for  instance),  had  surgery  done  on 
his  scrambled  brain  that  night, 
and  then  laid  in  a  coma  for  nearly 
two  weeks  before  they  shut  the 
machines  off  last  Friday. 

Every  time  I  hear  about  a  case 
like  Jimmy  Garcia,  I  wince.  And 
it  seems  like  lately  we've  been 
hearing  more  and  more  of  these 
stories.  Just  a  few  months  ago  it 
was  Gerald  McClellan  fading  to 
black  after  a  fight  in  London. 
He'll  probably  live,  they  say,  but 
his  life  will  never  be  the  same. 

Thai's  what  boxing  docs.  And. 
when  it  comes  right  down  to  it, 
boxing  should  probably  be 
banned  because  of  its  potential  to 
wreak  such  havoc.  It's  just  kind 
of  hard  to  argue  for  boxing's 
benevolence  when  kids  like 
Jimmy  Garcia  are  dying  as  a 
direct  result  of  its  brutality.  But, 
as  scary  as  it  may  seem,  it  is 
equally  difficult  for  me  to  surren- 
der my  love  for  the  sport,  and  for, 
in  general,  selective  violence  in 
sports.  Where  it  serves  a  purpose, 
I  think  violence  is  rockin'.  I  just 
don't  like  it  when  people  die 
because  of  it.  (Nice  fourth-grade 
reasoning,  huh?) 

As  it  were,  I'll  probably  never 
go  so  far  as  to  advocate  the  ban  of 
boxing,  even  in  the  wake  of  such 
tragedy  as  Garcia  losing  his 
young  life.  And  that,  in  your 
mind,  may  very  well  make  me  a 
sick  puppy,  but  I  cannot  deny  my 
love  for  such  primal  thrills.  It's 
probably  bad  genes  or  something. 

All  I  can  say  in  my  defense  is 
that  boxers  know  what  they're 
doing  when  they  get  in  the  ring. 
They  know  the  potential  is  there 
for  tragedy.  But  for  whatever  rea- 
son -  money,  ego,  primal  bar- 
barism -  they  do  it  anyway.  Me? 
I'm  just  along  for  the  ride. 

I  realize  it's  a  pretty  sorry  argu- 
ment, but  it's  the  best  I  could 
come  up  with. 

I  say,  just  make  'em  wear  head- 
gear and  let  *em  keep  fighting. 
That  way,  I  get  my  violence  and 
nobody  dies.  Sounds  fair,  doesn't 
it? 

By  the  way.  when  does  Tyson 
fight  again? 


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30    Tuesday,  May  23, 1995 


Daily  Bruin  Sports 


Daily  Bruin  Sports 


W.  TENNIS 

From  page  32 

after  dropping  a  tough  opening 
round  doubles  match  with  sister 
Stephanie  to  Arizona  State's  Kori 
Davidson  and  Joelle  Schad  6-3, 
6-4.  Sheppard,  who  lost  a  previ- 
ous meeting  to  Chi  at  the 
National  Team  Indoor 
Championships,  took  1 1  of  the 
first  14  games.  Then  Chi  came 
back  to  win  the  next  three  games. 
"Jane  fought  really  hard  and 
kept  herself  in  the  match  when 
she  could  have  just  folded," 
Zaima  said. 


•  •  • 


SCOTT  O/Daily  Bnjtn 

UCLA's  top-ranked  Jane  Chi  lost  to  Stacy  Sheppard  of  Georgia, 
6-2,  6-4,  in  the  round  of  16  of  the  NCAA  Tennis  Championships. 


Pfiebus  got  herself  noticed  last 
season,  reaching  the  finals  of  the 
1994  NCAA  Singles 

Championship.  That  began  a 
string  of  four  consecutive  tourna- 
ments where  she  reached  the 
final  round.  But  she  also  had 
another  streak  going  -  four 
straight  finals  losses. 

"And  there  was  a  time  that 


Keri  was  wondering  if  she  could 
ever  win  a  final,"  Zaima  said. 

She  finally  broke  through  at 
Pac- 10  Indoors  for  her  first  colle- 
giate tournament  win.  From  that 
point  in  early  January,  sl)e  would 
only  lose  one  more  match  en 
route  to  a  perfect  dual  match 
.record,  a  Pac-10  and  two  national 
titles. 

Although  the  NCAA  singles 
title,  which  comes  with  an  invita- 
tion to  the  U.S.  Open,  is  often  a 
springboard  to  the  pro  tour, 
Phebus  will  try  to  become  the 
third  woman  to  win  back-to-back 
national  singles  titles. 

"I've  had  too  much  fun," 
Phebus  said.  "There's  too  much 
college  has  to  offer  to  sell  myself 
short  one  year." 


UCLA  senior  Susie  Starrett 
didn't  have  a  memorable  return 
to  the  courts  after  sitting  out  six 
weeks  with  a  knee  injury.  In  her 
first  match  back,  she  and  partner 
Phebus  squandered  a  5-1  third- 
set  advantage  in  a  pivotal  doubles 


match  against  Stanford  last 
Sunday. 

"I  think  we  got  better  as  each 
match  went  on,"  Phebus  said. 
"The  first  match  there  was  some 
rust  there.  But  Bill  got  on  me 
because  I  was  putting  too  much 
pressure  on  myself  so  Susie 
stepped  it  up  and  played  some  of 
the  best  tennis  I've  .seen." 

In  the  doubles  final,  Starrett 
was  back  to  midseason  form.  She 
extended  her  range  at  the  net  and 
solidified  her  serve,  losing  only 
one  service  game  against  Pace 
and  Cristina  Moros  of  Texas. 

"When  Susie  holds  her  serve, 
they  are  just  unbeatable,"  Zaima 
said.  "They  return  and  close  (to 
tihe  net)  so  well  together." 

Starrett  runs  through  a  peculiar 
mechanic  while  preparing  to 
serve.  She  bounces  the  ball  sever- 
al times  then  in  one  motion  bends 
her  legs,  bows  her  head  and  dips 
her  racket.  Then  just  as  quickly, 
she  straightens  up  just  before 
tossing  the  ball  up. 

"She's  practicing  her  curtsy  for 
Wimbledon,"  Phebus  said. 


When  Finals  Are  Over 
The  Cramming  Begins 


Save  tinne  and  energy.  Let 
us  pack  and  ship  it  all! 


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Westwood  BLVD 


CONFfRENCE  FINALS, 

(B«sl-0(  7) 


M«y22 

DO  94.  San  Antonio  93,  Houston 
toads  serws  1-0. 

TMStfay.  May  23 

Indtana  at  Orlando.  8  p  m  (TNT) 


May  24 

HoMlon  at  San  Antonio,  5  30  p  m 
(TNT) 

TkMntfay.  May  25 

Indiana  at  Orlando.  5  p  m.  (TNT) 

Friday.  May  26 

San  Antonio  at  Houston,  6  p  m  (TNT) 


r.  M*y  27 

OrlMido  at  Indiana.  12:30  p  m  (NBC) 

tMday.  May  28 

San  Antonio  at  Houston,  12  30  p  m 
(NBC) 


HOUSTON  94.  SAN  ANTONIO  93 


HMttOII 

FG 
Plyf  MA 
R  Horry  15  5-8 
Chtlcult  14  0-0 
Otejuwon  12  24  3-3 
Drejder  10-21  4-5 
Smith  2  7  1-1 
MEKa  5-9  2-2 
Jones  3-5  0-0 
C  Brown  0  3  0-0 
CaiMi     2-7   2-2 


FT    Ret>ounds 

MA  Ofl-Del-Tot  Ast  PF  Rs 


5  6  3  3 
5  5  3  3 
5   8  6  5 


7 

2 

27 

25 

5 

16 

6 

0 

6 


Tot  36-B5  17  21   12  31  43  26  26  94 

Saa  Antonio 

FG  FT  Ret)ounds 
Plyr  M-A  MA  Otl-Oet-Tot  Ast  PF  Pts 
Rodnan  17  2-4  5  15  20  2  2  4 
Elliott  9  1  5  8  1  6  7  2  2  24 
RoiNnson5-17  11-16  6  3  9  2  4  21 
AJotmson  9-14  0-0  1  1  2  9  2  18 
OalNegr  3-7  1-2  0  2  2  2  2  8 
Parson  0-3  2-3  0  3  3  0  1  2 
Cuirnninfls  2-40-002201  4 
Raid  2  3   0-0000114 

Rivers        2-74-602205    8 


Anderson   0-00-000000     0 
Tot  33-78  25-39  13  34  47  18  20  93 

Houston  26   26   22   20  -   94 

San  Antonio      23   30   15   25  -   93 


NBA  ORAR  ORDER 


First  Roand 


Golden  State 

LA  Clippers 

Ptiiiadelphia 

Washington 

Minnesota 

Toronto  or  Vancouver 

Toronto  or  Vancouver 

Detroit 

New  Jersey 

Miami 

Milwaukee 

Dallas 

Sacramento 

Boston 

Denver 

a-Atianta  or  Miami 

Cleveland 

Portland 

b-Houston  or  Portland 
?0  Chicago 
21  Phoenix  (Irom  LA  Lakers) 

Charlotte 

Indiana 

Dallas  (from  New  York) 

Orlando 

Seattle 

Ptjoenix 

Utah 

C-San  Antonio  or  Denver 


1 

2 

3 

4 

5 

6 

7. 

8 

9 

10 

11 

12 

13 

14 

15 

16 

17 

18 

19 


22 
23 
24 
25 
26 
27 
28 
29 


a -Atlanta  has  an  option  to  send  to 

Miami  Its  1995  or  19%  first  round 

draft  Choice 

b-  Houston  will  give  Portland  its  first 

round  draft  choice  if  certain  conditions 

are  met 

c-  If  Detroit's  first  round  pick  is  not  one 

of  rtie  top  eight  picks,  then  San 

Antonio  has  the  right  to  swap  first 

round  picks  witti  Detroit. 

Sacond  Roand 

30  Detroit  (from  Los  Angeles  Clippers) 

31  d-Chicago  (from  Minnesota)  or 
Washington 

32  e-Wasltington  or  Chicago  (from 
Minnesota) 

33  Boston  (from  Pbiladelphia  via 
Utah) 


34  Golden  State 

35  Toronto  or  Vancouver 

36  Toronto  or  Vancouver 

37  Washington  (from  Detroit) 

38  Milwaukee  (from  New  Jersey  via 
Orlando) 

39  f-Miami  or  Atlanta 

40.  Golden  State  (from  Milwaukee  via 

LA  Lakers) 

41  Houston  (from  Dallas) 

42.  Atlanta  (from  Sacramento) 

43.  Milwaukee  (from  Boston) 

44  Denver 

45  Atlanta 

46.  Cleveland 

47.  Sacramento  (from  Portland  via 
Golden  8Ute) 

48  Minnesota  (from  Chicago) 

49  Minnesota  (from  Houston) 

50  Golden  State  (from  LA  Lakers  via 
Seattle) 

51  Sacramento  (from  Charlotte) 

52  Indiana 

53  Los  Angeles  Clippers  (from  New 
York) 

54  Seattle 

55  Golden  State  (from  Orlando  via 
Seattle) 

56  Phoenix 

57  Atlanta  (Irom  Utah) 

58  Portland  (from  San  Antonio  via 
Houston) 

d>  If  Washington  has  a  higher  pick 

than  Minnesota  in  the  first  round,  then 

Chicago  will  have  pick  31  in  the  second 

round   if  Minnesota  has  a  higher  pick, 

then  Washington  will  have  pick  31  in 

the  second  round 

e=  The  expansion  team  which  has  the 

higher  selection  in  the  first  round  will 

have  the  lower  selection  in  the  second 

round 

U  Atlanta  is  entitled  to  Miami's  pick  if 

Atlanta  sends  its  first  round  pick  to 

Miami. 


NHL  Playoff  at  a  Glance 


CONFEREHCEtOIIFIimt 

(Best-of-7) 

Satarday.  May  21 

Pittsburgh  3,  New  .Jersey  2 

Sunday,  May  21 

Detroit  6,  San  Jose  0,  Detroit  leads 

series  1-0 

PIMaddlphia  5.  New  Yoiii  4.  OT 

Ctticaoo  2.  Vancouver  1 ,  OT,  Chicago 


leads  series  1-0 

Monday.  May  22 

Philadelphia  4,  N  Y  Rangers  3,  OT, 
Philadelphia  leads  series  2-0 
New  Jersey  4,  Pittsburgh  2,  series  tied 
1-1 

Taoaday,  May  23 

San  Jose  at  Detroit,  4:30  p  m  (ESPN) 
Vancouver  at  Chicago,  5:30  p.m. 
(ESPN2) 

Wadnttday.  May  24 

Philadelphia  at  NY  Rangers,  4:30  p.m. 

(ESPN2) 

Pittsburgh  at  New  Jersey.  4:30  p.m. 

Tharaday,  May  25 

Chicago  at  Vancouver,  7  p  m. 
Detroit  at  San  Jose,  7:30  p.m. 

Friday,  May  2S 

Philadelphia  at  NY  Rangers,  4:30  p.m. 
Pittsburgh  at  New  Jersey,  4:30  p.m. 

Satarday,  May  27 

Chicago  at  Vancouver,  12  p.m. 
Detroit  at  San  Jose,  4:30  p.m. 

Sunday,  May  2S 

Vancouver  at  Chicago,  12  p.m  (FOX), 

if  necessary 

NY  Rangers  at  Philadelphia,  TBA,  if 

necessary 

New  Jersey  at  Pittsburgh,  TBA 


Maior  Lea^u>   h.i      hall   at  a 
Gl.incf 


AMERICAN  LEAGUE  GLANCE 


East  Division 

Boston 
New  York 
Detroit 
Toronto 
Baltimore 
Cantrai  Division 

Cleveland 
Milwaukee 
Kansas  City 
Chicago 
Minnesota 
Watt  Oivitlon 

California 
Oakland 


W 
14 
12 

11 

10 

9 

W 
15 
12 
10 


W 
15 
13 


L 
8 
9 

13 
14 
13 

L 
7 
12 
13 
14 
16 

L 

9 

11 


Pet.  GB 
.636  - 
.5711  1/2 
458  4 
.417  5 
409  5 

Pet  GB 
882  - 
500  4 
4355  1/2 
364  7 
333  8 

Pet  GB 
625  — 
542    2 


Seattle 
Texas 


12  11 

13  12 


5222  1/2 
.5202  1/2 


Monday's  Gamaa 

Detroit  10.  Seattle  8 
Kansas  City  7,  Toronto  0 
Milwaukee  7,  Cleveland  5 

Titosday's  Gamaa 

Milwaukee  (SparVs  1-0)  at  Cleveland 

(Martinez  3-0),  4:05  p.m. 

Minnesota  (Guardado  0-1)  at  Detroit 

(Dwells  1-3).  4  05  p.m. 

Kansas  City  (Pittsley  0-0)  at  Toronto 

(Menhart  1-1),  4:35  p.m. 

Texas  (Gross  1-3)  at  Chicago  (Alvarez 

1-2).  5:05  p.m 

Boston  (Sele  3-1)  at  Seattle  (Bosio  2- 

0),  7  05  p.m. 

Baltimore  (Brown  3-1)  at  Oakland 

(Harkey  1-1).  7:05  p.m. 

New  York  (Rivera  0-0)  at  California 

(Finley  0-4),  7:05  p.m. 


JubBu. 


East  Ohfislon 

Philadelphia 
Atlanta 
Montreal 
New  York 
Florida 
Cantrai  Division 

Chicago 
Houston 
Cincinnati 
St.  Louis 
Pittsburgh 
Watt  Division 

Colorado 
San  Francisco 
San  Diego 
Los  Angeles 


W  L 

17  6 

14  10 
13  12 

10  14 
5  19 

W  L 

15  8 
13  11 

12  11 

11  14 
9  14 

W  L 

15  10 

13  12 
11  13 
10  14 


Pet.  GB 
739  - 
.5833  1/2 
520    5 
.41771/2 
20812  1/2 

Pet.  GB 
652  - 
.5422  1/2 
.522  3 
440  5 
391     6 

Pet.  GB 
.600  - 
.520    2 
4583  1/2 
.41741/2 


Mooday'a  Gamas 

Montreal  5.  Florida  2 

Cincinnati  3,  Houston  2, 10  innings 

Colorado  9,  Chicago  8 

Taatday't  Gamat 

San  Diego  (Ashby  2-2)  at  Montreal 
(Fataaro  4-1).  4:35  pm.       V 
San  Francisco  (Portugal  2-1)  at 


Philadelphia  (Schilling 3-0), 435 p.m. 

Houston  (Kile  1-2)  at  Cincinnati  (Pugh 

1-0),  4:35  p  m 

Florida  (Hammond  0-0)  at  Pittsburgh 

(Loaiza  1-1),  4:35  pm. 

Los  Angeles  (Nomo  0-0)  at  New  York 

(Mticki  2-0).  4:40  p.m 

Atlanta  (Maddux  2-1)  at  St.  Louis 

(Jackson  0-4),  5:05  p.m. 

Chicago  (Foster  2-2)  at  Cotorado 

(Freeman  0-1),  5:05  p.m. 


BASEBALL  

Amartcan  Laaflua 

CLEVELAND  INDIANS— Activated  Paul 
Shuey.  pitcher,  from  the  15-day  dis- 
abled list  and  optioned  him  to  Buffalo 
of  the  American  Association. 
TEXAS  RANGERS— Sent  Juan 
Gonzalez,  outfielder,  to  the  club's 
extended  spring  training  program. 
National  Laagua 
SAN  FRANCISCO  GIANTS— Sent 
Shawn  Estes,  pitcher,  and  Wilson 
Delgado,  shortstop,  to  Burlington  of 
the  Midwest  League  Sent  Mike 
Schietelbein,  pitcher,  to  extended 
spring  training  Placed  Aaron  Charlton, 
pitcher,  on  the  disabled  list 


lASKETIALl 

GOLDEN  STATE  WARRIORS-ltomad 
Rick  Adelman  head  coacti 
USA  BASKETBALL— Named  Renee 
Brown  and  Nell  Fortner  assistant 
women's  national  team  coaches. 
HARLEM  GLOBETROHERS— Signed 
James  Bacon,  center 

CDLLEOE  FOOTBALL 

ROSE  BOWL—  The  price  of  Rose  Bowl 
tk:kets  will  increase  from  $48  to  $75  a 
seat  starting  with  the  game  next  New 
Year's  Day. 

FOOTMU 

National  Football  Laagua 

Dallas  Cowboys— Signed  unrestricted 
free  agent  quarterback  Wade  Wilson  to 
a  threa-year  contract. 
Green  Bay  Paclcars— Acquired  defen- 
sive tackle  Ferrk:  Collons  from  the 
Atlanta  Fak:ons  for  past  considerations. 


Compiled  By  Sean  Daly 
Sources  AP  wire  and  ESPN  Sports/one 


Tuesday,  May  23, 199^    31 


Track  team's  throwing  squad 
refuses  to  rest  on  its  laureis 


By  Scott  Yamaguchi 

Daily  Bruin  Senior  Staff 

It  probably  goes  without  saying 
that  this  year's  UCLA  women's 
track  and  field  team  boasts  one  of, 
if  not  the  strongest  collegiate 
throwing  crews  ever. 

In  the  latest  NCAA  rankings, 
senior  Dawn  Dumble  and  fresh- 
man Suzy  Powell  ranked  first  and 
second,  respectively,  in  the  discus, 
while  junior  Valeyta  Allhouse  and 
Dumble  ranked  first  and  second, 
respectively,  in  the  shot  put. 

In  fact,  the  Bruins'  clo.sest  com- 
petitor in  the  shot,  Alana  Preston 
of  Tennessee,  has  managed  a 
throw  of  only  54  feet,  9  1/4  inches 
this  season.  That  falls  nearly  4  feel 
short  of  Dumble's  sea.son  best  (58- 
4  1/2),  and  more  than  7  feet  short 
of  Althouse's  sea.son  best  (61-10 
1/4). 

But  with  such  a  lack  of  compe- 
tition, is  UCLA  throwing  coach 
Art  Venegas  worried  that  his  ath- 
letes won't  find  reason  to  be  at 
their  best  at  the  NCAA  Outdoor 
Championships? 

No  way.  Althouse  learned  a 
hard  lesson  earlier  this  year  at  the 
NCAA  Indoor  Championships, 
where  she  was  favored  to  finish 
second  and  wound  up  third. 

"Let  me  tell  you  a  little  story," 
Venegas  said.  "We  went  to  indoor 
4iationals  as  heavily  favored  as 
we've  ever-been,  and  guess  w^at  - 
Valeyta  didn't  get  second,  she  goi 
third. 

"I  don't  think  that's  been  for- 
gotten, I  don't  think  you'll  be  see- 


ing them  look  past  anybody  at 
nationals.  Yeah,  they  know  their 
marks  are  better,  and  they're  older 
and  stronger,  but  believe  me, 
we're  going  there  very  cognizant 
of  the  fact  that  if  you  don't  get  the 
job  done,  somebody  else  will." 

•  •  • 

As  if  having  Dumble  as  a  team- 
mate wasn't  enough  to  push 
Althouse,  or  the 
NCAA  Indoor 
lesson  still  did- 
n't serve  as 
enough  of  a 
reminder,  the 
junior  Ail- 
American 
found  yet 

another  source 
of  motivation  at 
last  weekend's 
Pac-10  Championship  Meet. 

Unlikely  as  it  may  seem,  that 
source  was  UCLA's  John  Godina, 
the  senior  All-American  who 
launched  a  world-leading  throw  of 
71-4  3/4  Friday  eyening  in  the 
men's  shot  put  competition. 

"It's  kind  of  a  little  rivalry  that 
John  and  I  have  -  the  10-foot 
thing,"  Althouse  said.  "I  don't  like 
him  to  gel  10  feel  ahead  of  me,  I 
gotta  slay  within  10  feet. 

"He  hit  the  71-4,  and  I  was  like, 
'Oh  god,  he's  going  to  kill  me 
today.'" 

Lucky  for  Althouse,  she  reeled 
off  her  best  series  ever  when  the 
women  look  the  shot  put  ring 
shortly  after  the  men. 

Her  first  attempt  flew  60-10 


3/4,  breaking  the  American  colle- 
giate record.  Then,  on  her  second 
attempt,  Althouse  erupted  with  a 
61-10  3/4  throw.  That  mark  ulti- 
mately won  the  competition,  but 
she  finished  her  six-throw  series 
with  no  fouls  and  four  throws 
over  59  feet. 


The  Pac-10  meet  marked 
UCLA's  last  opportunity  to  earn 
qualifications  to  the  NCAA 
Championships,  which  start  next 
week  in  Knoxville,  Tenn. 

Aside  from  Dumble's  qualifi- 
cations in  the  shot  put  and  di.scus, 
Althouse's  in  the  shot  and 
Powell'sL  in  the  discus,  only  Amy 
Acuff,  Karen  Hecox  and  the 
1,600  relay  have  attained  auto- 
matic standards. 

Hecox  is  qualified  in  the  5,000 

with  a  time  of  16:03.9  -  the  fourth 

best  time  in  the  nation.  Acuff, 

with  her  collegiate  record  leap  of 

6-6  in  the  Pac-10  high  jump  com- 
petition, is  the  nation's  top-rated 

high  jumper;  and  the  relay  team 

of  Camille  Noel,  Shelia  Burrell, 

Darlene  Malco  and  Cicely  Scott 

has  run  the  fourth-fastest  time  in 

the  nation  (3:33.17). 

Provisionally  qualified,  and 

likely  to  make  the  cut  are  Scott  in 

the  400-meters,  Hecox  in  the 

1,500  and  3,000  (though  she  will 

not  run  all  three  events),  Bisa 

Grant  in  the  100  hurdles,  Nada 

Kawar  in  the  shot  put,  Althouse 

and  Kawar  iir  the  discus,  Powell  ^„^,  ^,^  „  ,^— 

,         .  , .  J    n  STEVE  KIM  /Daily  Bruio 

in  the  javeltn  and  Burrell  m  the     Valeyta  Althouse  used  male  counterpart  John  Godina  as  motiva- 
hcptathlon.  tlon  for  her  collegiate-record  shot  put  throw  at  Pac-lOs. 


TUESDAY 

Starving  Student  Might 

?1.99  Harnburger,  Coke, 
and  Pries 


Come  try  our  ^-Ball  Salads, 

Chalk  It  Up  Appetizers,  and 

Billiard  Burgers! 


WEDWESDAY 

Greek  Might! 
$1.00  Jelio  Sfiotfi 
20<:  Buffalo  Wings 


I  HOUR  PREE  POOL 

w/Lunch  Purchase 


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WEST  OP  BARRIWGTOW 

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(210)  4-77-7550 


32    TuMday,  May  23, 1995 


Daily  Bruin  Sports 


Sports 


Bruins  hope  for  possible 
Michigan  rematch,  but 
have  to  face  Iowa  first 


World 


Hawaii  was  on  its  way  to  an  upset  and  a  tie  Clark  (10-0)  was  supposed  to  be  the 

breaker  game.  Bruins*  No.  2  pitcher  this  season  after  trans- 

But  rather  than  losing  focus  and  allowing  ferring  from  Georgia  State  in  the  fal^r.  But 

the  game  and  the  trip  to  Oklahoma  City  slip  with  Australian  National  Team  player  Tartya 

away,  the  Bruins  came  back  in  the  sixth  Harding  joining  the  team  over  spring  break. 


By  Melissa  Anderson — 

Daily  Bruin  Senior  Staff 

The  UCLA  softball  team  is  no  stranger  to 
the  College  World  Series.  In  fact,  the  Bruins 
have  made  a  trip  to  the  final  eight  12  times 
in  the  last  13  years  and  have  garnered  seven 
NCAA  titles,  more  than  any  other  program 
in  the  country. 


inning  and  scored  the 
-winning  run  when  senior 
Jennifer  Brundage  drove 
in  Kelly  Howard  with  an 
RBI  single. 

"I  think  that  earlier  in 
the  year,  we  weren't  ever 
really  fully  into  the 
game,"  Brundage  said. 
"We  weren't  as  focused 
as  we  should  have  been 


This  season  is  no  exception  for  UCLA, 
which  earned  a  spot  in  this  year's  CWS  by      and  that's  why  we  ended 
winning  the  Southern  Regional  last  week-      up  losing. 


Clark  was  relegated  to  the  bench  and  saw 

very  little  action^^ — ^ — r-? — — - — 

The  Tennessee  native  entered  the 
Regionals  carrying  with  her  memories  of 
last  year's  Regional  final  -  where  she  suf- 
fered a  season-ending  knee  injury  while 
pitching  on  the  same  field  for  Georgia 
State. 

But  rather  than  dwell  on  the  events  of 
,the  past  year,  Clark  came  out  and  pitched  a 
one- hitter  to  record  the  victory. 

"It  was  a  huge  boost  for  Kaci  to  get  that 
-  .  ^  win  becau.se  she  has  had  to  be  in  a  sec- 

end  m  .South  Carolma.  The  Bruins  cruised  "(Sunday),  we  were  very  focused,  we     ondary  role  for  most  of  the  vear  and  that's 

through  their  first  two  games  with  an  8-0  were  very  determined  to  win  becau.se  we  very  difficult  for  someone  of  her  caliber," 
win  over  Campbell  and  a  9-0  victory  over  knew  that  was  what  would  put  Us  into  the  UCLA  co-head  coach  Sue  Enquist  .said.  "It 
Hawau  in  the  second  round.  Championships."  was  nice  to  see  her  come  in  and  respond 

But  in  a  rematch  with  the  Rainbows  ...  and  to  hold  Campbell  down." 

.Sunday  afternoon,  UCLA  looked  to  be  in  With  junior  transfer  Kaci  Clark  getting  •  •  • 

trouble  after  blowing  a  3-0  lead.  back  into  the  pitching  rotation  and  earning         Joining  UCLA  in  the  World  Series  will 

Reminiscent  of  several  regular-season     the  victory  in  Friday's  game  against     be  top-seeded  Arizona,  Princeton,  UNLV 
games  in  which  the  Bruins  took  an  early     Campbell,  the  Bruins  proved  they  have     and  Cal  State  Fullerton  in  the  upper  bracket, 

lead  and  then  lost  the  momentum  as  well  as     three  solid  pitchers  to  help  them  make  it     — : [ 

the  game,  it  seemed  that  second-seeded     back  to  the  finals.  See  SOFTBALL,  page  28     Krtlil  Evans  Was  baurng!34^ 


AMY  PENG  /Daily  Bfum 

Prior  to  the  NCAA  Regionals,  UCLA's 


Bruin  junior  netter  endures  1 1  roun(Js 
of  tennis  in  five  days  to  nab  trophies 


4^N(  AA 

Tennis 


I  1/^1  A  «•        1      *.  FRED  HE 

UOLA  senior  Susie  Starrett  (left)  more  than  came  back  from  her  midseason  knee  injury  as  she 
and  teammate  Keri  Phebus  won  the  1995  NCAA  doubles  crown  last  weekend  at  Pepperdine. 


By  Chris  Isidro 

MALIBU  —  The  NCAA 
Championships  are  a  grueling 
way  to  end  a  long  season.  Ten 
days  of  tennis  sounds  grueling 
enough,  but  it's  worse  than  it 
seems. 

Right  after 
suffering  the 
disappoint- 
ment of  los- 
ing the  team 
tourney,  the 
players  have 
to  bounce 
back  to  play 
in  the  64- 
draw  singles 
and  the  32- 
tandem  dou- 
bles brackets.  That  meant  I  I 
rounds  of  tennis  in  five  days  for 
both  NCAA  singles  and  doubles 
titleist  Keri  Phebus  and  national 
runner-up  Kelly  Pace. 

Phebus  survived  her  five  days 
by  eating  bananas  during  the 
changeovers  and  receiving  rub- 
downs  and  ice  between  match- 
es. The  Bruin  junior  was  seen 
on  Friday  standing  in  a  waste- 
basket  full  of  ice. 


BMItlOX    I    KOKIli 
r  H  *  ^  P  I  0  \  t  N  I  P  t 


"We  tried  not  to  overplay  her 
this  year  but  she  won  so  many 
rounds  at  so  many  tourna- 
ments," UCLA  head  coach  Bill 
Zaima  said.  "But  she  and  (team- 
mate Jane)  Chi  were  the  two 
players  that  spent  more  time  at 
practice  than  anybody«el.se." 

Pace  had  it  worse  than  any  of 
her  counterparts  at  Pepperdine 
the  last  week  and  a  half.  She 
played  in  the  final  nine  days  of 
the  tourney  including  five  dual 
matches,  five  doubles  and  six 
singles. 

"I  don't  know.  I  guess  I'll 
have  some  drinks  at  the  hotel 
bar,"  Pace  said.  "But  condition- 
ing, stamina,  all  that  is  thrown 
out  the  window  when  you  get  to 
a  certain  point.  It's  all  about 
who  wants  it  more." 


Top-ranked  Chi,  seeded  third 
in  the  singles  tournament, 
ended  her  season  on  a  low  note 
losing  to  Georgia's  Stacy 
Sheppard  6-2,  6-4  in  the  round 
ofI6. 

Chi  entered  the  match  the  day 

See  W.  TENNIS,  page  30 


Sorting  out  the  rockin '  violence  of  sports 


Considering  the  boisterous 
manner  with  which  I  con- 
duct most  of  my  social 
affairs  (read:  I'm  a  loudmouth), 
it's  no  surprise  that  many  of  my 
friendships  involve  a  certain 
amount  of  violence.  But  when  it 
comes  to  my  relationship  with 
Jason,  sometimes  it  seems  like 
violence  is,  well,  required. 

You  see,  ever  since  I  got  to 
know  Jason  late  last  summer,  I've 
carried  with  mc  a  certain  desire  to 
whoop  his  ass  from  time  to  time.  I 
mean,  I  love  the  guy  like  a  broth- 


er, but,  as 
those  of  you 
with  brothers 
understand, 
sometimes 
you  just  have 
to  kick  the 
crap  outta 
somebody. 
And  who  bet- 
ter than  some- 
one you  love? 

And  so 
went  my 
friendship 


Eric 
Billigmeier 


with  Jason.  F^'ar  too  many  times 
we  goaded  each  other  to  the  brink 
of  pure  hatred  before  cooling 
down  with  a  few  rounds  of  bare- 
knuckle boxing.  One  incident  par- 
ticularly stands  out  in  my  men^ory 
-  it  involved  a  few  too  many 
Shakey's  $2.99  pitchers,  an  empty 
Gayley  Avenue  sidewalk  and  a 
congenial  homeless  man  who 
tried  to  teach  us  the  ins  and  outs 
of  pugilism.  .Solid  entertainment. 
Kvcntually,  Jason  and  I  reached 
the  point  where  we  felt  the  need 
to  box  so  much,  and  the  bruises 


from  our  boxing  affairs  hurt  so 
bad,  that  we  had  to  take  the 
inevitable  step  of  self-protection. 
Wc  bought  gloves. 

(What's  even  funnier,  while 
purchasing  the  gloves,  we  kinda, 
well,  beat  the  hell  out  of  each 
other  in  Aisle  2  of  Big  Five 
Sporting  Goods.  Hey,  we  had  to 
test  out  the  product,  you  know?) 

At  this  point,  you  probably 
think  Jason  and  I  are  a  tad  loony, 
and  in  a  way,  you're  probably 


;  page  29 


"■" 

Inside  Sports 

( 
( 

Rom 

Atthouse  to 
penthouso 

Valeyta  Althouse  and  the 
rest  of  the  UCLA  women's 
track  and  field  throwing 
crew  are  no  doubt  the  class 
of  the  nation,  but  will  being 
at  the  top  affect  the  Bruins' 
performance  at  nationai.s? 

See  page  31 

University  of  Califomia,  Los  Angeles 


84th Year,  No.  128 
Circulation:  20,000 


Daily  Bruin 


Wednesday 
May  24, 1995 


IFC  regains  sponsorship  amid  bylaw  cliange 


Sponsored  groups 
equally  eligible  for 
funding,  facilities 


By  Rathmi  Nijagal 

Dally  Bruin  Staff 

The  undergraduate  student 
council  voted  10-0-1  in  favor  of 
responsoring  the  Interfraternity 
Council  (irc)  at  a  meeting  last 
night.  At  the  same  time,  the  coun- 


cil  passed  a  bylaw  change  to 
broaden  student  group  guidelines, 
makmg  all  sponsored  organiza- 
tions equally  eligible  for  council 
funding  and  facilities. 

IFC  President  Mike  Chao  made 
a  presentation  to  the  undergradu- 
ate council  asserting  that  the  IFC 
is  making  strides  toward  over- 
coming stereotypes  which  have 
plagued  the  organization.  Chao 
cited  the  greek  system's  advance- 
ment, such  as  sponsoring  speakers 
on  homosexuality  and  working 


with  the  Women's  Resource 
Center  to  educate  fraternity  mem- 
bers. Chao  arso  asked  campus 
community  members  for  their 
help. 

"RepreseRtation  irimportant?'^ 
Chao  said.  "And  there  are  a  cou- 
ple things  that  I  ask.  Tolerance  is 
the  most  importanf^thing.  Equality 
is  the  second  thing  that  we  ask. 
(These)  are  what  Student 
Advocacy  Groups  ask  and  it  is 
what  (IFC)  asks." 

Just  before  the  IFC  issue  was 


placed  on  the  table  last  night,  a 
bylaw  change  extended  the  cHgi- 
bility  guidelines  for  undergradu- 
ate groups  on  funding  and 
facilities. 

Under  the  new  guidelines,  all 
groups  sponsored  by  the  under- 
graduate student  government  are 
equally  eligible  for  "office  .space, 
base  budgets  and  logistical  sup- 
port from  the  council,"  as  needed. 

Underrepresented  student  orga- 
nizations and  student  advocacy 
groups  will  no  longer  automati- 


cally receive  funding  or  facilities 
as  wras  previously  stated  in  the 
bylaws.  Advocacy  groups  were 
establi.shed  in  the  1980s  to  ensure 
minority  students  a  voice  on  cam- 


Alpha  Partners  change  ASUCLA  structure 


Consultants  cut 
personnel,  work 
to  improve  ties 

By  Patrick  Kertcstra 

Daily  Bruin  Staff 

Tension  had  been  building  in 
the  students'  association  (ASU- 
CLA) for  a  full  year. 

The  student  majority  board 
qf^directors  was  losing  trust  in 
the  organization's  top  manage- 
ment, and  ASUCLA's  employ- 
ees were 
losing  confi- 
dence in  the 
board. 
Foreshocks, 
such  as  the 
stern  warn- 
ings of  out- 
s  i  d  e 
consultants 
Kibel  Green, 
alerted  some 
association  insiders  that  a 
major  jolt  was  coming. 

But  when  the  board 
announced  its  intent  to  termi- 
nate i4-ycar  executive  director 
Jason  Reed,  most  were  stunned 
by  the  magnitude  of  the  deci- 
sion. 

Exactly  one  month  later, 
aftershocks  still  rumble 
through  ASUCLA.  Amidst  hur- 
ried rebuilding  efforts,  offices 
arc  reorganizing  and  major  per- 
sonnel changes  continue. 

The  force  behind  the  most 
recent  decisions  are  the  Alpha 
Partner  turnaround  consultants, 
hired  by  the  board  for  $25,000 
a  month  to  restore  ASUCLA's 
profitability  and  organizational 
health.  Charles  Mack  and 
Douglas  Drumwright,  the  two 
owners  of  the  firm,  are  heading 


Changing  of  the  guard 


Since  the  Alpha  Partners  turnaround 
consultants  were  hired  to  restructure 
ASUCLA,  numerous  important  officials 
have  been  removed  from  their  positions  or 
placed  on  leave. 


Exacutiva 
Diractor 


Financa 
Diractor 


Format  Jason  Roed 
Pr«««it  Alpha  Partners 

(Interim) 


6ouro«:  ASUCLA 


Valerie  McCormick 
Rich  Delia 

(Interim) 


Valerie  McCormick ;  Robert  Wise 

Valerie  McCormick  position 

terminated 


up  the  association  as  temporary 
co-executive  directors. 

Their  actions  and  ASUCLA's 
performance  in  the  next  six 
months  are  critical  to  the  asso- 
ciation's long-term  survival.  If 
the  $80  million  organization 
goes  bankrupt,  precedent  sug- 
gests the  university  and 
Chancellor  Charles  Young 
would  take  it  over. 

What  Young  would  do  with 
ASUCLA's  business,  including 
the  student  store  and  food  ser- 
vice sites,  is  unknown.  Student 
government  and  media, 
presently  overseen  by  the  asso- 
ciation, would  also  face  an 
uncertain  future. 

Trying  to  avoid  immediate 
financial  failure,  but  at  the 
same  time  ensure  long-term 
financial  success,  the  Alpha 


Partners  are  revamping  the 
entire  organization. 

In  recent  weeks,  they  have 
removed  long  entrenched  asso- 
ciation employees,  streamlined 
some  of  the  association's 
administrative  offices,  worked 
to  re-establish  relationships 
with  the  university  and  hired  a 
new  chief  fmancial  officer. 

The  head  financial  position 
is  an  important  one  at  ASU- 
CLA. Jason  Reed  was  the  chief 
of  finances  before  moving  up 
to  executive  director. 

Before  hiring  a  new  financial 
chief,  the  consultants  fired 
longtime  employee  Valerie 
McCormick  from  her  position 
as  finance  director.  However, 
McCormick  held  two  positions, 
and  she  is  still  officially  the 
human  re.sources  director. 


JINO  OK/D«ily  Brun 

But  McCormick  was  on 
vacation  when  the  new  finance 
director  was  hired,  and  imme- 
diately following  her  return  she 
left  again  on  medical  leave. 

The  new  finance  director, 
Rich  Delia,  was  handpicked  by 
the  consultants  because  of  his 
experience  and  track  record 
with  other  non-profit  compa- 
nies. Mack  said. 

"The  organization  has  need- 
ed a  strong  financial  leader,  he 
(Delia)  is  doing  a  great  job,  and 
will  be  a  key  part  in  turning 
this  place  around,"  Mack  said. 

Delia's  contract  is  similar  to 
the  consultants,  meaning  he  is 
with  the  associated  students 
only  temporarily.  But  unlike 
the  consultants,  Delia  could  be 


See  SNAKEUP,  page  11 


pus  and  a  means  of  support. 

Some  speculate  that  the  bylaw 
change  was  a  political  maneuver 
to  ensure  the  responsorship  of  the 
fraternity  council  because  the 
change  was  made  after  elections 
and  immediately  before  the 

See  SPONSOR,  page  13 

Decreased 
attendance 
may  result  in 
stipend  loss 

By  Rashmi  Nljagal 

Daily  Brum  Staff 

Lack  of  attendance  at  student 
government  meetings  may  result  in 
lack  of  pay  for  elected  student  offi- 
cers next  year. 

In  a  unanimous  vote  at  last 
night's  student  council  meeting, 
undergraduate  student  government 
leaders  enacted  a  bylaw  change  that 
requires  all  elected  student  council 
members  to  attend  two-thirds  of  all 
council  meetings  every  quarter 

For  every  meeting  past  the  maxi- 
mum one-third  amount  that  mem- 
bers are  allowed  to  miss  each 
quarter,  one  stipend  check  will  be 
taken  away.  Attendance  will  be 
taken  20  minutes  after  the  meeting 
starts  and  immediately  before  the 
meeting  ends  in  order  to  ensure  that 
council  members  are  present  for  the 
entire  meeting.  t 

Although  the  bylaw  changes 
have  been  discussed  during  last 
year's  administration  and  during 
the  fall  quarter  of  last  year,  the  issue 
was  tabled  until  council  members 
felt  comfortable  about  voting  on  it. 

"I  think  it  is  important  to  impress 
upon  future  council  members  how 
important  council  is,"  said  Todd 
Sargent,  financial  supports  com- 
missioner 'The  work  we  do  here  is 
important  and  people  need  to  be 
here." 

Others,  however,  feel  that  the 
bylaw  change  limits  counciT  mem- 
bers. 

"It  is  overlooking  the  fact  that 
council  members  have  other  roles 
as  well,"  said  York  Chang,  external 
vice  president  and  president-elect, 
who  was  not  present  at  the  council 

See  BYLAWS,  page  10 


Seale  files  suit  against  'Pantiier' 


Party  co-founder 
alleges  inaccuracies, 
misrepresentation 

By  Michael  Howerton 

Daily  Bruin  Staff 

Bobby  Seale,  co-founder  and 
former  chair  of  the  Bl.ick  Panther 
Party,  plans  to  file  a  $3.75  million 
lawsuit  today  against  the  movie 
Panther,  claiming  that  the  movie  is 
full  of  lies  and  misrepresentations 
of  history. 

It  is  illegal  to  appropriate  some- 


one's  character  without  their 
approval  under  Pennsylvania  state 
law,  Seale  said  from  his  home  in 
Philadelphia.  By  using  that  state 
law  in  a  federal  couct,  Seale  said  he 
will  sue  for  commercial  appropria- 
tion of  name,  character  and  likeness 
without  his  consent. 

"Ninety  percent  of  the  movie 
never  happened,"  Scale  said.  "They 
are  trying  to  pass  it  off  as  authen- 
Uc." 

The  film  was  not  intencted  to  be 
taken  as  a  history  lesson,  said 
Preston  Holmes,  co-producer  of  the 
film. 

"It  is  a  film,  a  combination  of 


fact  and  fiction.  Composite  charac- 
ters are  used  to  get  the  spirit  of  the 
young  members.  It  is  about  the  spir- 
it of  the  Panthers,  not  to  tell  the 
story  verbatim,"  he  said. 

The  portrayal  of  history  in  the 
movie  was  based  on  extensive 
research  and  consultations  with 
many  former  Black  Panthers, 
Holmes  said. 

"Bobby  Seale  obviously  has 
problems  (with  the  movie)," 
Holmes  said,  "hut  extensive  num- 
bers were  pleased  (with  the  film). 
The  response  is  overwhelmingly 
favorable." 

See  PANTHUI,  pigft^    CourtiMy  B.  Vtanc*  Xleft)  plays  Bobby  Seale  mPaDtbsr. 


2      WMiiMday,  May  24, 1995 

^— ^<iW  — — — ■ 


Daily  Bruin  News 


Daily  Bruin  News 


WediieMlay,  May  24, 1995      3 


What's  Brewin'  Toiiajr 


Community  Service  Commission 

Applications  for  1995-96  CSC  Staff  due  today 
Kerckhoff408      825-2333 


11  a.m. 


Student  Accounting  Society 

Work  Life  Balance  in  Public  Accounting 
Ackerman  2408 


Raza  Graduation  1995 

Carne  asada  sale 
PerloffQuad     206-5547 


1  p.m. 


Environmental  Coalition 

Property  Rights  vs.  Environmental  Protection 
Ackerman  2408      206-4438 


2  p.m. 


Campus  Events  Commission 

Women  in  Hollywood  Forum 
Ackerman  Grand  Ballroom      825-6223 


3  p.m. 


Christian  Science  Organization  UCLA 

Campus  weekly  meeting 
560  Hilgard  Ave.     474-4016 


4  p.m. 


Hong  Kong  Student  Union 

Election  and  annual  general  meeting 
Dodd  121      444-0633 


4:30  p.m. 


PCH  (Piliplnos  for  Community  Health) 

General  meeting       * 
Ackerman  2408      824-7600 


5  p.m. 


Alpha  Lambda  Delta  and  Phi  Eta  Sigma 

Mandatory  information  meetmg  for  LA  Works 
Kinsey  372  \ 

Association  of  Chinese  Americans 

1995-96  staff  elections 
Franz  1260 

UCLA  Model  United  Nations 

General  meeting  , 

Ackerman  3517     825  1 24  i — — 


UCLA  Society  of  Forensic  Sciences 

Getting  into  the  clinical  psychology  Ph.D. 
Franz  3461      433-3936 

Undergraduate  Political  Science  Association 

Open  House 
Bunche4269     208-7108 


6  p.m. 


Shakespeare  Reading/Performance  Group 

Reading  of  2  Henry  IV 
Rolfe2310 


Daily 
Bruin 


CXXXIV. 


YM 


24,11 


Editor  m  Chlaf :  Mates  Ooid 
Editor  In  Training:  Roxan«  Marqtwz 


6:30  p.m. 


Asian  American  Christian  Fellowship 

'Those  Relationships" 

Factor  Building  A660     208-380 1 


7  p.m. 


Student  Alumni  Association  Career  Networit 

Careers  in  consulting  and  in  the  environment 
James  West  Alumni  Center     824-7 1 52 

Westwind  -  UCLA's  Journal  of  the  Arts 

Poetry  reading  and  open  mike  .  " 

Kerckhoff  Art  Gallery     794-4996 


Managing  Edttor:  Jennrfer  Lee 
Naw*  E^or:  Train  Nguyen 

Aast  Naws  Edttors:  Gil  Hopenttand. 

JuHaSHva.  Donna  Wong 

WIra  EdMor  Jamas  Snyder 
Viewpoint  Edttor:  Michele  Keller 

Aast  viewpoint  Edttor:  Roxana  Marquez 
Attar  Hours  Edttor:  Aime4  WUoox 
AAE  Edttor:  Victor  Chen 

AaaL  AAE  Edttora:  Oenise  Cruz. 

Michael  Horowitz.  Robed  Stevens 
Sporta  Edttor:  Lawrence  Ma 

Aaat  Sports  Edttors:  Melissa  Anderson, 

Eric  Branch,  Scott  Yamaguchi 
Senior  Copy  Edttor:  Pennte  Collins 

Aaat.  Senior  Copy  Edttor:  Laurel  Davis 

Copy  Edttors:  Mary-Rose  Abraham. 

Amy  Daurio.  Elizabeth  Escobedo, 
—  Michele  Haydel,  Megan  Kennison, 

Annmarie  Liermann,  Negin 

Mirmirani.  Rachanee  Srisavasdi.Tricia 

Voehl 
Senior  Production  Edttora:  Anna  Ar>drews. 

Birte  Scholz 
Oeaign  Director  Brian  Ng 

Oealgnera:  Kant  Lim.  Oamon  Seeley 

Paglnators:  Brenton  Mar.  Frances  Poon 


Art  Director:  Jino  Ok 

Aaat.  Art  Director:  Amber  Keller 
Art  Staff:  Jerry  Bui,  Susan  Choi,  Tania 
Qoncalaz-Ottega,  Melanle  Okamura, 
Paler  Zaslav 

Photography  Edttor:  Andrew  Scholar 
Aaat  Pttotography  Edttors: 
Jorwthan  Ferrey.  Audrey  Lee 
Staff  Photographers:  Nwkias  Akers, 
Steve  Kim.  Abby  Moskowitz,  Scott  O,  Amy 
Peng.  Justin  Warren 

Senior  Staff  Writers: 

News:  Phillip  Carter.  Narfcy  Hsu 

AAE:  Jennifer  Richmond.  Michael  Tatum 

Sports:  Tim  Costner.  Esther  Hui 

Staff  Writers: 

News:  Michael  Howerton,  Patrk;k  Kerkstra, 

Allyssa  Lee,  Kimt>erty  Mackesy,  Jennifer 

Monta,  Rashmi  Nijagal,  Betty  Song 

A&E;  Bartiara  Hernandez, 

Lael  Loewenstein,  John  Mangum 

Sporta:  Eric  Billigmeier,  Hye  Kwon, 

Christian  Schreiber 

After  Hours:  Adrienne  Dortch 

Editor  In  Chlef'a  Aaat.:  Wendy  Lee 

Listings  Edttor:  Ayako  Hagihara 

Sports  Box  Compiler:  Sean  Daly 


Sales  Manager:  Jerry  Weitzman 

Aaat  Sales  Managers:  Tyson  Harper, 
Ron  Mehrens,  Abdula  Towfigh 
Account  Executives:  Dan  Binn, 
Bnan  Bruskrud.  Naomi  Cooper, 
Matt  Oamelio,  Dwain  Davis.  Pete 
Gielniak.  Lisa  Gikt,  Merri  Goldt>erg. 
Bruce  Kember,  Matt  Missakian,  Chris 
Nunes.  Malt  Shapiro,  Shawn  Silk 

Operationa  Martagar:  Julie  Ohara 
Aast.  Managers:  Michael  Johnson, 
Erk;  Yar>g 

Operationa  Staff:  Jenny  Evenson.  Jennifer 
Hansen,  Andrew  Jones,  Ann  Loveil,  Megan 
McCarthy,  Laurie  Wu 


Claaatfled  Manager:  Sally  Barclay 
Aaat  Managers:  Tina  Chiu,  ' 
Michelle  Gosom 

Classified  Une  Staff:  Becky  Berth, 
Marissa  Bowman.  Kelly  Chung, 
Chns  Degrool,  Scott  Kim,  Alex  Lesser. 
Jeremy  Lin,  Game  Macy 

Claaalfied  Display  Manager:  Allison  Zweig 
Claaalfled  Display  Staff:  Simon  Hamlin, 
Kns  Hamrick,  Shannon  McMillan, 
Alk:ia  Way 

Creative  Director:  Clement  Wortg 
Aaat  Creetlve  Director:  Yush  Yuen 
Creative  Staff:  Danny  Chang,  Doris  Mao, 
Sharon  Wang,  Jennifer  Young 


l>roductiofi: 


Advertising  Production  Manager: 

Elizabeth  Magallanes 
Advertiaing  Production  Supervlaor 
_     Michael  O'Connor 


Student  Production  Staff:  Ghnstoplier  Bates, 
Jennifer  Brown,  Floridia  Cheung. 
Narineh  Hacopian.  Joe  Ksander,  Kenji 
Morrow,  Pamela  Palma,  Jonathan  Ricasa, 
Consuek)  Rodriguez,  Alex  Vladimirsky 


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Panel  debates  future  of  mMcy 


Academic  Council 
sponsors  fonim  on 
affinnative  action 

By  Jennifer  K.  Merita 

Daily  Bruin  Staff 

In  the  on-going  debate  over  uni- 
versity and  statewide  affirmative 
action  policies,  the  UC  Academic 
Council  is  sponsoring  a  day-long 
forum  today,  examining  various 
aspects  of  the  controversial  issue. 

The  Council  -  the  systemwide 

umbrella  organization  for  faculty  - 
scheduled  19  speakers,  including 


Tom  Wood,  co- 
author  of  the 
Cal  ifornia 
Civil  Rights 
Initiative 
which  could 
eliminate  affir- 
mative action 
policies 
throughout  the 
state. 

Organizers 
ate  anticipating  between  400  and 
450  people  to  attend  today's  forum, 
said  Sylvia  Cloutier  a  spokesperson 
for  the  chancellor's  office. 

"Affirmative  action  affects  the 
future  of  education  in  this  university 


-  who  has  access,  what  kind  of  stu- 
dent body  and  faculty  we  have,  and 
that  affects  the  education  process 
that  takes  place  here,"  said  Carole 
Goldberg- Ambrose,  one  of  today's 
panel  moderators.  "I  don't  think 
there's  any  doubt  about  it." 

The  topics  speakers  will  address 
include  the  historical  and  economic 
setting  behind  affirmative  action, 
politics,  the  legal  context,  higher 
education  and  a  panel  on  the  future 
of  affirmative  action.Council  orga- 
nizers of  the  forum  wanted  speakers 
from  a  wide  range  of  perspectives, 
said  Terty  Colvin,  a  spokesman  for 

See  FORUM,  page  12 


Affirmative  action  forum 


TMill  a  scNkJiJ*  o4  i^MMdUNV  for  tw  flr9t  dlKAJMion  (^  tw  affirmattve  ac^ 
fdniiii,  Th«  Hi^ork^  wti  ioonomic  Setting,  from  10  to  11  a.m. 


9:45  a.m. 


1:30  p.m. 


2:45  p.m. 


3:45  p.m. 


5  p.m. 


Opening  and  Welcome 

The  Historical  and  Economic  Setting 

Speaker*:    Mario  Garcia,  Race  and  Ethnicity  in  American 
History:  A  Latino  Perspective 
Hugh  Davis  Graham,  Affirmative  Action's  Paradox: 
Increasing  Strength,  Decreasing  Legitimacy 
Jonathan  Leonard,  Federal  Employment  Policy 
and  the  Economic  Positon  of  Women  and  Minorites 
Cecilia  Conrad,  Tt)e  Economic  Cost  of  Affirmative 
Action 

Sociology  and  PolKics 

Lunch 

The  L^gal  Context 

Higher  Education 

Reading  the  Future 

Closing  ~^     "^ 


.  St»p«  f  .#XiV 


Activist  still  fighting  after  years  of  protest 


UCLA  alum,  longtime _^ 
activist  Frank  Wilkinsc^ 
fights  Anti'terrorist  Act 

By  Philip  iglauer 

The  FBI  hounded  UCLA  graduate  Frank 
Wilkinson  for  38  years  beginning  in  1942. 

Federal  officials  tapped  ^lis  phone,  followed 
him,  burglarized  his  offices  and  were  even 
aware  of  a  planned  assassination  of  the  civil 
rights  activist  in  1964. 

Wilkinson,  a  current  board  member  of  the 
American  Civil  Liberties  Union,  was  on  the 
FBI's  Adex  list,  the  list  of  250  people  consid- 
ered by  the  FBI  to  be  the  most  dangerous  to 
national  security.  As  a  result,  the  FBI  compiled 
over  132,000  pages  of  38  years  of  surveillance 

Part  one  in  a  series 

on  his  life. 

After  a  history  of  civil  rights  activism, 
Wilkinson,  the  executive  director  of  the 
National  Committee  Against  Repressive 
Legislation  (NCARL),  is  now  fighting  against 
the  Senate's  impending  Omnibus  Anti-terror- 
ism Legislation. 

Opponents  of  the  bill  fear  it  will  infringe  on 
the  First  Amendment  rights  of  U.S.  citizens 
and  residents  by  broadening  FBI  investigative 
powers  whenever  the  government  feels  nation- 
al security  is  in  question. 

Despite  Wilkinson's  activism,  he  was  a  self- 
proclaimed  conservative  in  his  youth,  he  said. 

He  grew  up  within  the  insulating  protection 
of  Beverly  Hills  in  an  upper-class  medical 
family  of  devout  Methodist  Republicans.  He 
attended  Beverly  Hills  High  Scliool  apd  went 
on  to  complete  his  education  at  UCLA.  And 
after  his  undergraduate  schooling,  Wilkinson 
planned  to  become  a  Methodist  minister. 

During  his  time  on  campus,  Wilkinson 
pledged  Sigma  Alpha  Epsilon  and  became  a 
candidate  for  president  in  the  Undergraduate 
Student  Association  Council  elections  of  1935 
-  a  race  that  he  lost  to  an  editor  at  the  Daily 
Bruin.  He  also  participated  in  campus  activi- 
ties popular  for  young  men  in  his  day,  like  the 
Men's  Board  social  club,  the  Rally  Committee 
and  Blue  Key  honors  society. 


Franl<  WIII<lnson  (center)  stands  with  Martin  Luther  King  Jr.  and  fellow  civil  rights 
activists  in  the  1960s. 

After  he  graduated  in  1936  with  a  degree  in 
political  science,  Wilkinson  had  no  inkling  he 
was  set  on  the  path  to  fight  against  the 
Omnibus  Anti-terrorist  bill. 

Wilkinson's  parents  sent  him  to  Bethlehem, 
Palestine.  There,  he  first  experienced  extreme 
squalor  and  inequality,  which  provoked  him  to 
rebel  against  the  hypocrisy  of  organized  reli- 
gion, he  said. 

"I  had  never  seen  poverty  in  my  life.  I  didn't 
know  any  people  of  color.  The  only  people  of 
color  I  knew  were  maids,"  he  explained. 

"I  was  so  shocked  by  the  contradictions  of 
the  teachings  of  building  a  better  world  -  and 
the  lives  of  people  begging  in  front  of  the 
church  of  the  Nativity  were  so  sick  and  pover- 
ty stricken  -  I  no  longer  wanted  to  be  a  minis- 
ter," he  said. 

After  traveling  throughout  the  Middle  East 
and  Europe  for  a  year  on  a  single-gear 
Hercules  bicycle,  he  returned  to  Beverly  Hills 
with  his  preconceptions  shattered  and  world 
views  changed. 

At  this  time  Wilkinson  met  Father  John 


See  WILKINSON,  page  8 


Frani<  Wilkinson  stands  behind  a  stack  of 
FBI  flies  that  hold  information  about  him. 


Bruin  recognized  for  community  service  record 


Saru  Jayaraman  earns  university,  public 
honors,  plans  to  attend  two  ivy  leagues 


By  Usa  Marie  Weyh 

Beginning  next  fall,  Saru 
Jayaraman  will  be  attending  gradu- 
ate school  at  two  ivy  league  univer- 
sities in  a  program  she  designed 
herself 

For  almost  five  years,  the  devel- 
opment studies/political  science 
senior  will  alternate  universities. 

She  plans  to  receive  a  Juris 
Doctor  from  Yale  Law  School  and  a 
master's  from  Harvard  University  in 
public  policy. 

This  year,  the  UCLA  community 
service  commissioner  was  recog- 


nized as  one  of  America's  top  20 
college  students  by  USA  Today. 
And  most  recently,  Jayaraman  was 
one  of  four  to  receive  the 
Outstanding  Senior  Award,  spon- 
sored by  the  U€i-A  Alumni 
Association. 

"I  nominated  Saru  for  the 
Outstanding  Senior  Award  because 
of  her  record  of  extraordinary  schol- 
arship,"  said  G.  Jennifer  Wilson, 
assistant  dean  of  the  honors  and 
undergraduate  programs.  "She  has 
an  impressive  and  self  confident 
intelligence  and  an  excellent  grasp 
ofcurraitafTairs." 


Among  her  plethora  of  honors, 
Jayaraman  has  been  named  a 
National  Truman  Scholar,  a  UCLA 
Distinguished  Scholar,  a  National 
Science  Scholar  and  a  UCLA 
Alumni  Scholar. 

"There  is  so  much  unnecessary 
injustice  in  the  world,"  Jayaraman 
said.  "With  all  this,  there  is  nothing 
more  innportant  for  me  lo  be  doing 
than  to  help.  My  life  revolves 
around  community  service." 

As  one  of  three  children  bom  in 
Rochester,  NY.,  Jayaraman  quickly 
developed  an  interest  in  public  ser- 
vice, which  led  to  the  beginning  of 
her  community  service  career  at 
UCLA.  The  incoming  Bruin  got  a 
head  start  working  with  the  Hunger 
Project  the  summer  before  her 


fre.shman  year. 

The  project  is  based  on  sub-pro- 
grams which  include  donations  and 
job  development.  The  current  exec- 
utive director.of  Hunger  Project, 
Judy  Lo,  remembers  when  she  met 
Jayaraman  two  years  ago. 

"Saru's  enthusiasm  is  what 
inspired  me  to  get  involved  with  the 
Hunger  Project,"  Lo  said.  "She  is 
very  motivated,  very  happy  and  she 
is  extremely  knowledgeable  about 
homeless  issues.  This  attracted  me 
tojointhejMwject." 

Last  year,  Jayaraman  was  elected 
as  community  service  commission- 
er. With  this  position,  she  oversees 
24  public  service  projects  that  .serve 

See  JAYARAMAN,  page  6 


Speaker 
attempts 
to  bridge 
racial  gap 

Thomas  challenges 
division  of  Jews, 
African  Americans 


By  Nancy  Hsu 

Daily  Bruin  Senior  Staff 

In  the  1930s,  many  Jewish  mer- 
chants in  Harlem  refused  to  hire 
African  Americans.  When  the  Black 
Power  movement  began  in  the 
1960s,  African- American  leaders 
said  the  movement  needed  lo  be 
financed  and  directed  only  by 
African  Americans,  effectively 
alienating  Jewish  supporters  and 
fueling  existing  tension  between  the 
two  groups. 

Some  African  Americans  consid- 
er Jewish  Americans  as  partly 
responsible  tor  their  enslavement. 
Some  Jews,  accuse  African 
Americansjof  harboring  anti- 
Semitic  feelings.  But  despite  their 
differences  scholars  are  trying  to 
forge  an  understanding  between  the 
communities. 

Dr.  Laurence  Mordekhai  Thomas 
is  one  of  many  African-American 
Jews  tcxiay  challenging  the  stereo- 
types that  have  flourished  oih  of 
ignorance  and  miscommunication. 

At  noon  today  in  Ackerman 
Grand  Ballnx)m,  Thomas,  a  philos- 
ophy and  political  science  professor 
and  a  member  of  Judaic  Studies  at 
Syracuse  University,  will  speak 
about  the  conflict  in  a  talk  titlea, 
"Flourishing  in  a  Hostile  ScK'icty: 
The  Lives  of  Blacks  and  Jews." 

"I  intend  to  be  as  evenhandcd  as  I 
can  about  the  issues."  Thomas  said. 
"I  don't  come  with  any  attempt  to 
divide  people.  I  think  there  are  hurts 
that  come  with  slavery  and  there  arc 


See  THOMAS,  page  6 


JUSTIN  WARREN/DiMy  Biutn 

Saru  Jayaraman 


xA- 


V 


4      Wednesday,  May  24, 1995 


Daily  Bruin  News 

6  


Daily  Bruin  News 


WedneMtay,  May  24, 19W      8 


brid 


Chechen  rebels 
continue  fighting 

GROZNY.  Russia  —  Chechen  rebels 
waged  a  fierce  firefight  with  Russian 
troops  on  the  northeastern  edge  of 
Grozny  early  Tuesday,  and  Russian  war- 
planes  targeted  the  militants'  southern 
strongholds. 

There  were  no  immediate  casualty 
reports  in  the  attacks  on  Russian  units 
guarding  the  Sevemy  airport  and  the  vil- 
lage of  Petropavlovskaya,  six  miles 
northeast  of  Grozny,  the  ITAR-Tass  news 
agency  said. 

The  latest  clashes  came  two  days 

before  Russian  and  Chechen  representa- 

_!L.ives  are  to  hold  peace  talks  in  Grozny 

sponsored  by  the  Organizatioh*for 

Security  and  Cooperation  in  Europe. 

Vatican  arranges 
refugees'  asyium 

BAKERSFIELD  —  The  Vatican  has 
arranged  asylum  in  Ecuador  for  1 5  Chinese 
refugee  women  who  fled  their  native  coun- 
try in  1993  to  oppose  family  planning  poli- 
cies, attorneys  for  the  women  said. 

Ecuador  officials  in  Los  Angeles  agreed 
Monday  to  accept  the  women,  part  of  a 
group  of  1 8  refugees  being  held  in  a  Kern 
County  jail. 

The  women  were  passengers  on  the 
Golden  Venture,  a  freighter  carrying 
Chinese  refugees  that  ran  aground  in  New 
York  Harbor  on  June  6,  1993.  They  had 
been  detained  in  New  Orleans  following 
the  accident  and  were  moved  to 
Bakersfield  April  14. 

Of  the  28  passengers,  21  have  been 
deported,  129  are  being  held  in 
Pennsylvania,  25  in  Washington  and  18  in 
Bakersfield. 


Garment  malcers 
igncre  U.S.  beyccrtt 

DHAKA,  Bangladesh  —  Bangladesh 
garment  manufacturers  said  Monday  they 
would  refuse  to  sign  an  anti-child-labor 
accord  despite  a  U.S.  boycott  of  their 
products. 

Redwan  Ahmed,  president  of  the 
Bangladesh  Garment  Manufacturers  and 
Exporters  Association,  said:  "Whatever 
decision  we  have  taken  we  will  be  firm 
about  it.  We  are  ready  to  face  any  propa- 
ganda against  Bangladesh's  garment^ 
industry." 

Last  week,  the  manufacturers  unex- 
pectedly vetoed  an  accord  with  interna- 
tional agencies  to  end  child  labor  in  their 
factories,  calling  it  unnecessary  and  intru- 
sive. 

Student  dissident 
en  hunger  strilce 

BEIJING  —  Wang  Dan,  a  student  leader 
in  the  1989  pro-democracy  protests,  has 
been  on  a  hunger  strike  since  he  was 
arrested  Sunday,  a  human  rights  group 
said  Tuesday. 

Wang  and  44  other  activists  and  intel- 
lectuals, including  some  of  China's  senior 
scientists,  signed  a  petition  last  week  call- 
ing on  the  government  to  reverse  its  con- 
demnation of  the  1 989  demonstrations.  It 
also  demanded  the  release  of  those 
imprisoned  for  taking  part  in  the  protests 
.  and  urged  the  government  to  be  tolerant 
of  people  with  different  views. 

Another  petition  calling  for  China  to 
establish  the  rule  of  law  was  made  public 
this  week  ahead  of  the  anniversary  of  the 
June  4,  1989,  military  crackdown  on  the 
protests  in  Beijing,  which  killed  hundreds 
of  unarmed  people. 


Ration 


Towns  Iceep  watch 
as  storms  approach 

STE.  GENEVIEVE,  Mo.  —  Rood-weary 
towns  were  keeping  watch  Tuesday  on  two 
threats:  the  swollen  Mississippi  River  and 
forecasts  of  approaching  stomis. 

The  Mississippi  crested  this  morning  at 
Ste.  Genevieve,  based  on  readings  from 
Chester,  111.,  a  dozen  miles  down  river,  the 
National  Weather  Service  said. 

The  river  was  at  43.8  feet  Tuesday  at 
Chester,  nearly  17  feet  above  flood  stage 
and  a  rise  of  half  a  foot  in  less  than  a  day's 
time,  forecasters  said. 

After  two  days  of  sunshine  that  allowed 
flood  fighters  to  get  some  rest,  a  wide  area 
of  storms  was  forecast  to  push  across 
Missouri  today  from  Kansas  and  Nebraska. 
Rain  is  forecast  through  Saturday. 

First  man  convicted 
under  new  fed  law 

CHARLESTON,  W. Va  —  The  first  man 
charged  under  the  nation's  new  federal 
domestic  violence  law  was  convicted 
Tuesday  of  beating  his  wife  into  a  coma 
and  driving  from  state  to  state  with  her  in 
the  car  trunk. 

Christopher  Bailey  showed  no  emotion 
as  the  jury  verdict  was  read  in  U.S.  District 
Court:  guilty  of  kidnapping  and  violating 
the  federal  Violence  Against  Women  Act 
passed  by  Congress  last  August. 

Prosecutors  claimed  that  in  November, 
Bailey,  34,  beat  his  33-year-old  wife, 
Sonya,  then  drove  for  six  days  aimlessly 
around  West  Virginia,  Kentucky  and  Ohio 
with  her  unconscious  in  the  car  trunk.  He 
finally  took  her  to  a  hospital  in  Corbin,  Ky. 

Sonya  Bailey  remains  in  a  coma,  and 
doctors  testified  she  would  never  have  a 
normal  life. 


Weils  contaminated 
by  old  pesticides 

BERKELEY  —  Pesticides  pumped  into 
the  ground  more  than  1 5  years  ago  have 
contaminated  wells  in  about  50  towns  and 
cities  near  California  farmlands,  a  new  uni- 
versity analysis  shows. 

Most  affected  areas  were  in  Central 
California  and  Riverside  County.  The  chief 
contaminant,  dibromochloropropane 
(DBCP),  is  a  suspected  carcinogen  and 
known  to  cause  sterility  in  humans. 
— Cities  affected  include  Fresno,  Lodi, 
Modesto,  Clovis,  Dinuba,  Reedley,  Tiilare, 
Manteca,  Parlier  and  At  water,  the  report 
said. 

The  analysis  found  that  the  problem 
does  not  affect  most  urban  water  systems 
or  systems  that  rely  on  the  Sierras. 

Pilot  jail  program 
to  intercept  aliens 

Federal  officials  expect  up  to  1,500 
deportations  during  a  30-day  pilot  pro- 
gram to  intercept  illegal  immigrant 
inmates  as  |hey  are  being  released  from 
the  Los  Angeles  County  jail. 

Attorney  General  Janet  Reno 
announced  the  one-month  test  program 
Monday  in  front  of  Men's  Central  Jail  - 
the  nation's  largest  county  jail. 

"INS  agents  will  be  here  24  hours  a 
day,  seven  days  a  week  to  take  criminal 
aliens  into  custody,"  Reno  said.  "In  the 
past,  many  of  these  aliens  would  be 
released  onto  the  streets.  Beginning  next 
week,  most  will  go  to  a  special  immigra- 
tion court  and  promptly  deported." 

The  $2  million  pilot  program  will 
begin  June  1. 

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COLOR  USED 


•      WsdnMday,  May  24, 1995 


Daily  Bruin  N«ws 


THOMAS 


From  page  3 

hurts  that  come  from  the 
Holocaust. 

"One  group  says  they've  suf- 
fered more  than  another,"  Thomas 
continued.  "How  do  you  define 
what  is  worse?  Not, all  suffering  is 
subsumable.  Just  because  you've 
suffered  doesn't  mean  you  under- 
stand my  suffering." 

Many  African  Americans  and 
Jews  said  they  do  not  harbor  any 
animosity  towards  each  olITfer 
because  they've  come  to  an  under- 
standing that  their  interestsare  dif- 
ferent. Others  say  there  is  a  need 
for  more  communication. 

While  at  UCLA,  Thomas  will 
talk  about  the  structural  differences 
between  how  Jews  and  African 
Americans  have  flourished  in 
America  and  how  .some  of  the  ide- 
ologies  of  racism  and  anti- 
Semitism  have  been  obstacles. 

"It's  an  ongoing  conflict,"  said 
Itibari  Zulu,  librarian  at  the  Center 
for  African  American  Studies. 
"The  conflict  is  some  kind  of  his- 
torical thing  that  started  on  the  East 
Coast  where  a  lot  of  merchants 
were  Jewish  and  a  lot  of  the  cus- 
tomers were  African  Americans 
who  felt  like  they  weren't  treated 


fairly. 

"A  lot  of  African  Americans  are 
Christians,  and  they're  not  sure  of 
what  Judaism  really  is,"  he  said. 

UCLA  has  not  been  unscathed 
by  the  tension. 

In  1991,  the  African- American 
newsmagazine,  Nommo,  ran  an 
article  defending  a  South  Central 
Los  Angeles  bookstore  for  selling 
"Protocols  of  Zionism,"  a  book 
seen  by  many  as  strongly  anti- 
Semitic.  The  article  infuriated  the 
Jewish  community. 

"Every  year,  there's  .something 
called  the  African  Marketplace," 
said  Chris  Tucker,  a  former 
Nommo  staff  writer.  "In  1991,  one 
oT  yt he  c o u nc i fm e h ,  Ze v 
Yaroslavsky,  found  out  one  of  the 
vendors  had  'Protocols  of 
Zionism'  and  he  wanted  that  book- 
store to  be  censored." 

Nommo  reported  several  death 
threats  against  the  writer.  Ha' am, 
UCLA's  Jewish  newsmagazine, 
and  the  Jewish  Student  Union  both 
went  to  the  ASUCLA 
Communications  Board  demand- 
ing that  Nommo  be  Censored  and 
that  an  apology  be  issued  in  the 
Daily  Bruin. 

In  March  1993,  a  campus  visit 
by  Kwame  Ture,  formerly  known 
as  Black  Panther  leader  Stokely 
Carmichael,  also  caused  a  stir. 


Jews  accused  Ture  of  distorting 
their  history,  for  characterizing 
them  as  enemies  and  for  implying 
they  had  contempt  for  Africans. 

Because  of  past  tensions,  orga- 
nizers of  today's  talk  hope  to  foster 
communication  between  the  differ- 
ent campus  groups. 

"We're  trying  to  go  beyond  the 
hostility  and  the  uneasiness  that 
has  been  gripping  the  different  eth- 
nic and  cultural  groups  on  campus 
these  past  few  years,"  said  Yiftach 
Levy,  a  member  of  Hillel  Jewish 
Students'  As.sociation. 

Thomas,  the  author  of  "Vessels 
of  Evil:  American  Slavery  and  the 
Holocaust"  and  "Living  Morally," 
describes  liim.setf  as  a  "plain  and 
ordinary  boring  scholar." 

Though  his  work  is  very  public, 
his  private  life  is  not. 

As  a  matter  of  principle,  Thomas 
refuses  to  tell  people  how  he 
became  Jewish. 

"If  you  saw  someone  who  was 
white,  I  am  almost  positive  you 
wouldn't  ask  them  how  they 
became  Jewish,"  Thomas  said. 
"We  assume  being  bom  Jewish  is  a 
providence  of  being  white.  My 
point  is  that  assumption  is  not  war- 
ranted. When  people  tell  me 
they're  Jewish,  I  take  them  by 
faith,  as  I  think  everyone  else 
should." 


JAYARAMAN 

From  page  3 

the  Los  Angeles  community. 

During  her  sophomore  year, 
along  with  students  Desiree 
DeSurra  and  Melissa  Vogel, 
Jayaraman  founded  Women  in 
Support  of  Each  other  (WISE),  an 
organization  that  provides  support 
for  young  girls.  The  volunteers 
mentor  adolescents  and  discuss  top- 
ics such  as  discrimination,  rape  and 
motherhood. 

"We  work  with  young  women  in 
middle  schools  to  educate  them 
about  different  issues,"  Jayaraman 
said.  "We  help  the.se  girts  take  con- 
trol over  their  lives  and  make  the 
be.st  choices  possible." 

In  addition  to  WISE,  Jayaraman 
created  a  high  school  program 
called  Learning  Initiatives  iN 
Knowledge  and  Service  (LINKS). 

"LINKS  allows  students  from 
UCLA  to  go  to  high  schools  and 
teach  them  how  to  mentor  younger 
students,"  Jayaraman  said.  "It  is  a 
much-needed  service  in  the  com- 
munity." 

Even  with  an  overall  GPA  of  3.9 
and  the  development  of  two  oi^gani- 
zations,  Jayaraman  said  she  is 
shocked  to  have  received  both 
awards. 


"Saru  is  too  humble,"  Lo  said. 
"She  is  a  very  hard  worker.  When 
she  sets  a  goal  for  herself,  she 
always  gets  it  done." 

Although  co-workers  say 
layaraman  is  committed  to  a  multi- 
tude of  community  service  oi^ani- 
zations,  Jayaraman  said  she  would 
like  to  remain  simply  one  among 
many  honorees. 

"There  arc  so  many  great  seniors 
at  UCLA,  it  feels  very  weird  to  be 
singled  out,"  Jayaraman  said.  "But 
the  Outstanding  Senior  Award  is  a 
nice  way  to  end  four  years  of  com- 
munity service." 

With  her  picture  appearing  in 
USA  Today,  Jayaraman  said  she  felt 
inadequate  among  the  other  19 
award  recipients. 

•i  didn't  feel  like  I  belonged 
among  all  those  students.  These 
people  are  Rhodes  scholars,  authors 
and  scientists,"  she  said.  "But  it 
meant  a  lot  to  me  for  the  country  to 
recognize  both  academics  and  com- 
munity service." 

As  the  senior  leaves  UCLA,  she 
said  she  hopes  all  students  find  a 
community  service  organization  to 
get  involved  with. 

"There  is  nothing  more  educa- 
tional in  a  college  experience  than 
servicing  the  community,"  she  said. 
"The  impact  of  service  will  stay 
with  you  forever." 


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Daily  Bruin  News 


WedfiaMlay,  May  24, 1995      7 


DON'T  UY  THE  FOREST  TO  RUIN 
RECYCLE  YOUR  DAILY  BRUIN 


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GRADUATE  S 
Of  MANAGE 


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COLOR  USED 


8      Wednesday,  May  24, 1995 


Daily  Bruin  News 


WILKINSON 

From  page  3 

Odwyer,  director  of  the  Citizens 
Housing  Council,  and  became 
involved  with  the  council  himself. 
In  1939,  Wilkinson  became  an 
activist  advocating  the  construction, 
oflow-rent  public  housing  in  place 
of  Los  Angeles  "slums,"  he  said. 

Wilkinson  demonstrated  against 
racial  housing  requirements «and  the 
L.A.  Housing  Authority's  projects. 
But  it  was  a' demonstration  against 
segregating  a  Watts  housing  project 
that  precipitated  the  FBI's  involve- 
ment in  his  life,  Wilkinson  said. 

"In  1942,  L.A.  was  as  segregated 
as  Atlanta'  Georgia  then," 
Wilkinson  recalled.  "Watts  was  a 
railroad  stop  between  Los  Angeles 
and  San  Pedro.  By  accident,  it  was 
an  integrated  community  -  a  third 
Latino,  a  third  African  American, 
and  a  third  Anglo  -  and  everyone 
lived  in  bad  housing." 

Then,  residents  were  segregated 
by  restricted  coVenance,  where 
homeowners  could  write  racial 


qualifications  into  their  deeds.  This 
meant  if  a  person  did  not  meet  the 
racial  requirement,  the  owner  could 
refuse  housing. 

As  a  result  of  his  activities 
against  housing  segregation,  federal 
surveillance  on  him  began  in  1942. 

"When  people  ask  me  what  was 
happening  then,  I  ask  them,  do  you 
mean  what  1  thought  was  happen- 
ing while  I  was  there,  or  what  was 
actually  happening?  Because  I  had 
no  idea  the  FBI  was  spying  on  me 
and  disrupting  my  life,"  Wilkinson 
said. 

It  was  during  the  Watts  demon- 
stration that  Wilkinson  first  wit- 
nessed racism.  The  director  of  the 
Housing  Authority  walked  up  to 
Qdwyer  on  the  picket  line  to  nego- 
tiate an  end  to  the  demonsU-ation. 

"AJI  right  father,  we'll  mix'em! 
Who  do  you  want  to  manage  this 
(housing  project)?"  he  said  to 
Odwyer. 

"How  about  Frank?"  Odwyer 
retorted. 

That  was  the  beginning  of 
Wilkinson's  civil  rights  activism  - 
nr»anaging  the  first  integrated  hous- 


ing projects  in  Watts. 

At  that  time,  the  FBI  determined 
public  housing  integration  a 
"nationjil  security  risk,"  Wilkinson 
later  discovered. 

Wilkinson  spent  the  next  10 
years  of  his  life  working  for  the 
Housing  Authority  in  slum  clear- 
ance and  public  housing  construc- 
tion. Then  he  became  embroiled  in 
what  many  call  an  infamous  chap- 
ter of  Los  Angeles  history. 

By  the  1950s,  the  Housing 
Authority  planned  to  build  public 
integrated  housing  in  the  Chavez 
Ravine  area,  aftd  the  City  Coucil 
approved  the  plan. 

"There  are  supposed  to  be  3,500 
homes  there  where  Dodger 
Stadium  stands  now,"  he  said. 

However,  Wilkinson's  life  turned 
during  one  imminent  domain  hear- 
ing in  1952  which  allowed  the  city 
to  procure  land  for  its  own  use. 
While  he  was  giving  official  testi- 
mony on  slum  conditions  in  the 
Chavez  Ravine  community,  the 
prosecutor  asked  him  what  would 
now  be  an  irrelevant  question. 

"The  prosecutor  asked  me  'what 


organizations  do  you  belong  to 
political  or  otherwist?'"  Wilkinson 
said. 

"This  was  the  time  that  the 
Rosenbergs  were  executed  for  sell- 
ing Atomic  secrets  to  the  Soviet 
Union,  the  time  of  the  Hollywood 
10,  the  Smith  Act,  the  Korean  War. 
People  were  forced  to  give  loyalty 
oaths  again  and  again  and  again," 
he  said  about  the  Communist  scare 
during  1940s  and '50s. 

"In  my  time  the  atmosphere  was 
different.  Communists  were  real 
people,"  he  said. 

After  refusing  to  answer  the 
question,  Wilkinson  lost  his  job  at 
the  Housing  Authority.  Los  Angeles 
Times  headlines  read:  "Reds 
Infiltrate  Housing  Authority" 
immediately  following  the  hearing. 

Wilkinson  now  believes  the,  FBI 
approached  the  prosecutor  and  his 
boss  at  the  hearing. 

However,  the  Los  Angeles  office 
of  the  Federal  Bureau  of 
Investigation  could  not  comment 
on  these  allegations,  said  John 
Hoos,  Los  Angeles  I^I  spokesman. 

He  went  on  to  explain  the  rivalry 


between  the  former  L.A.  Police 
Chief  William  Parker  and  Fletcher 
Bowron,  the  Los  Angeles  mayor 
from  1948  to  1952.  Wilkinson  was 
a  political  supporter  of  Bowron 
while  working  for  the  Housing 
Authority. 

"Real  estate  interests  had  always 
believed  public  housing  was 
'creeping  socialism,'  but  it  wasn't," 
he  explained. 

During  his  work  with  the 
Housing  Authority,  Wilkinson  was 
unaware  of  the  depth  and  extent  of 
the  FBI's  surveillance. 

Wilkinson's  experience  with  the 
FBI  is  one  of  the  most  dramatic 
cases  cited  by  critics  of  the  upcom- 
ing anti-terrorist  legislation.  The 
Omnibus  bill  would  enable  the  FBI 
to  legally  and  arbitrarily  investigate 
individuals  and  groups  it  feels  are  a 
threat  to  national  security. 

"His  life  suggests  the  govern- 
ment will  use  its  authority  from  an 
'anti-terrorism  act'  to  go  after  polit- 
ical opponents  and  political  opposi- 
tion,"  said  Carole 

Goldberg-Ambrose,  UCLA  law 
professor. 


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WedneMiay,  May  24, 1995      9 


PANTHER 


From  page  1 

Although  Holmes  claimed  that 
Seale  was  portrayed  in  "the  most 
positive  and  heroic  light  possible," 
Seale  disagreed. 

"They  have  me  saying  dumb 
stuff  that  I  never  said,"  Seale  said, 
adding  that  he  is  portrayed  falsely 
as  a  street  thug  and  an  accomplice 
to  murder. 

'They  fucked  everything  up,"  he 
recalled  thinking  when  he  saw  the 
movie  at  a  screening  in  late  April. 
"They  fucked  up  the  whole  histo- 

Seale  said  he  also  plans  to  sue  for 
false  light  invasion,  meaning  that 
his  character  was  damaged  by  a 
false  portrayal.  Many  similar 
claims  have  been  successful  under 
the  Pennsylvania  law,  he  added. 

"This  is  a  movie,  not  a  text 
book,"  said  Melvin  Van  Peebles, 
who  wrote  the  screenplay  and  pro- 
duced the  film  along  with  his  son, 
Mario  Van  Peebles  and  Holmes. 
"It's  a  work  of  fiction,  but  1  believe 
it  captures  the  spirit  of  the  thing.  It 
evokes  the  mood  of  a  period,  an 
overview  of  a  time." 

♦There  is  nothing  defamatory  or 
anything  that  is  not  public  knowl- 
edge in  the  film.  Van  Peebles  said. 
He  added  that  he  has  no  idea  why 
Seale  has  a  problem  with  the  movie 
and  dismissed  the  criticisms  as  just 
Seale  being  tenitorial  about  his  his- 
tory. 

There  were  some  initial  concepis 
when  Seale  threatened  to  sue  for  an 
injunction  against  the  release  of  the 
film.  Holmes  said.  But  he  added 
that  since  that  never  happened,  he 
has  doubts  whether  Seale  will  go 
through  with  his  lawsuit  at  this 
point. 

If  he  does.  Holmes  said  that  the 
lawsuit  wouldn't  have  much  effect 
on  the  film  since  it  has  already  been 
released. 

"At  this  point  all  that  could  hap- 
pen if  the  lawsuit  is  filed  and  if  it  is 
successful  is  the  collection  of 
money  for  damages,"  he  said. 

The  multi-million  dollar  lawsuit 
against  Polygram  and  Gramercy 
Pictures  seeks  an  injunction  to  pre- 
vent the  viewingf  and  marketing  of 
the  movie  pasnhe  box  office,  said 
Seale.  He  added  that  the  video  and 
cable  rights  are  too  lucrative  for  the 
film  companies  to  risk,  so  he 
expects  a  settlement  out  of  court. 

While  the  movie  portrayed  the 
young  Seale  and  his  co-founder 
Huey  Newton  as  street  thugs,  Seale 
contends,  in  fact,  the  Panthers  grew 
out  of  the  young  black  intelli- 
gentsia. 

Seale  alleges  that  Van  Peebles  is 
riding  the  well-worn  track  of 
defamation  that  began  in  the  '60s, 
when  the  FBI  attempted  to  destroy 
the  Panthers'  support  base  by  fer- 
menting dissent  and  manipulatmg 
public  opinion. 

"It  caters  to  the  old  FBI  stereo- 
type to  put  that  crap  on  the  screen," 
he  said. 

Seale  said  he  was  still  in  contact 
with  over  1.000  former  Black 
Panther  Party  members  across  the 
nation,  and  he  has  received  nothing 
but  support  from  them  in  his 
actions  against  the  party  portrayal 
in  the  movie. 

"The  party  members  despi.se  that 
film,"  Seale  .said. 

Claiming  that  the  movie  was  a 
travesty  to  the  history  it  attempts  to 
portray,  Eldridge  Cleaver,  former 
minister  of  information  for  the 
party,  was  also  outraged  by  the 
film.  Cleaver  declared  the  movie, 
"still-bom  on  a  foundation  of  false- 
hoods." He  charged  the  producers 
with  "stealing  history." 

Cleaver  said  it  was  difficult  for 
him  to  say  anything  good  about  the 
movie,  and  that  it  was  a  missed 
golden  opportunity  to  make  a  mon- 

See  FANTNER,  page  12 


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Daily  Bruin  News 


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Two  people 
shot  during 
White  House 
confrontatioii 

The  Associated  Press 

WASHINGTON—  A  man 
reportedly  trying  to  climb  over  a 
gate  at  the  White  House  and  a  uni- 
formed Secret  Service  officer  were 
shot  late  Tuesday  night  on  the  White 
House  grounds,  officials  said. 

A  dispatcher  at  the  Secret  Service 
said  there  was  an  "incident"  at  the 
White  House  but  would  not  com- 
ment further. 

A  spokeswoman  at  George 
Washington  University  Hospital 
seven  blocks  from  the  White  House 
said  a  uniformed  Secret  Service 
officer  and  a  civilian  were  both 
brought  to  the  hospital  shortly  after 
1 1  p.m. 

The  officer  was  shot  in  his  arm, 
while  the  other  man  was  wounded 
in  his  upper  body,  said  the  spokes- 
woman, Merle  Goldberg.  Both  were 
in  stable  condition  and  it  was  not 
immediately  known  whether  either 
would  need  surgery,  she  said. 

She  said  neither  injury  was  life 
threatening.  The  identities  of  the 
two  people-who  were  shot  were  not 
immediately  available. 

WRC-TV  reported  that  the  shoot- 
ing occurred  when  a  man  attempted 
to  climb  over  the  southwest  gate  of 
the  White  House  and  a  uniformed 
Secret  Service  officer  confronted 
him. 

The  shooting  occurred  shortly 
before  11  p.m.  after  President 
Clinton  had  returned  to  the  execu- 
tive mansion  after  addressing 
Democratic  congressional  cam- 
paign committees.  Clinton  was 
reported  to  be  unharmed. 

The  first  paramedic  on  the  scene, 
Thomas  Crabb,  said  both  men  had 
been  shot  in  the  left  arm. 

Under  heavy  guard,  Modjeski, 
37,  was  brought  into  the  hospital  in 
handcuffs  to  be  treated.  About  an 
hour  later  the  head  of  Secret 
Service,  Ron  Noble,  arrived  at  the 
hospital  to  oversee  the  investigation. 

An  hour  after  the  shooting,  uni- 
formed Secret  Service  officers  stood 
in  small  clusters  on  streets  sur- 
rounding the  White  House  as  patrol 
cars  with  lights  flashing  drove  past 
from  time  to  time.  Reporters,  cam- 
era crews  and  a  handful  of  passers- 
by  were  kept  across  the  street  from 
the  rear  fence  area  where  the  shoot- 
ing occurred. 

Spotlights  illuminated  parts  of 
the  South  Lawn  but  the  mansion 
i  tsel  f  was  darkened . 

The  shooting  occurred  just  after 
President  Clinton  had  returned  to 
the  executive  mansion  after  address- 
ing Democratic  congressional  cam- 
paign committees. 


Dally  Bruin  News 


Wednesday,  May  24, 1995    11 


BYLAWS 


From  page  1 

table  to  vote. 

"Basically,  using  attendance  at 
council  meetings  as  the  sole 
requirement  to  receive  the  little 
money  student  government  gets 
anyway  overlooks  the  importance 
of  the  work  they  do  outside  of 
council  meetings." 

Still,  council  members  said  the 
change  is  important  in  holding  stu- 
dent government  leaders  account- 
able for  their  responsibilities  to  the 
student  body  at  large. 

"This  is  not  to  say  council 
responsibilities  are  more  important 
than  individual  office  responsibili- 
ties," said  President  Rob 
Greenhalgh.  "But  it  still  provide* 
more  accountability  to  a  council 
member's  fiduciary  responsibility 
to  the  association." 


SHAKEUP 

From  page  1  .^-.    . 

a  candidate  for  a  permanent  posi- 
tion at  ASUCLA. 

In  another  major  personnel 
change,  the  consultants  fired 
Robert  Wise,  the  association's 
project  coordination  manager 
and  recent  UCLA  graduate.  Wise 
held  an  important  position,  and 
was  entrusted  by  Reed  to  sign 
documents  in  place  of  Reed  and 
other  important  division  chiefs. 

That  authority  was  revoked 
within  days. 

Alpha  Partners,  who  fired 
Wjse  immediately  following 
Reed's  dismissal,  dissolved  his 
position  and  split  his  responsibil- 
ities among  other  employees. 
Mack  said. 

On  the  student-run  side  of  the 
organization  -  the  board  - 
reform  has  been  less  dramatic 
and  slower  moving. 

Initially,  Alpha  Partners'  quick 
efforts  encountered  some  resis- 
tance by  board  members,  espe- 
cially in  changing  the  makeup  of 
the  board  itself.  Some  of  the  con- 
sultants'  proposals  included 
reducing  board  control,  and  in 
particular  limiting  student  influ- 
ence. 

Student  representatives  were 
not  enthusiastic  about  the  idea, 
but  since  then,  board  members 
have  largely  approved  of  the 
consultants'  work. 

"I  can't  say  I've  been  dis-. 
turbed  or  shocked  by  anything 
they've  done  at  all,"  said  Karol 
Dean,  co-chair  of  the  board's 
finance  committee.  "I  think 
they're^ing  a  good  job." 

PearjoBrug,  a  graduate  student 
representative,  said  the  consul- 
tants pace  was  different  than 
ASUCLA  traditionally  has  been, 
but  effective. 

"There's  a  lot  going  on  now. 
Things  are  happening  at  a  faster 
pace,  so  that's  taking  some  time 
to  get  used  to,"  Brug  said. 

Perhaps  more  important  than 
relations  with  the  board,  and  cer- 
tainly more  confidential,  are  the 

"There's  a  lot  going  on 

now.  Things  are 

happening  at  a  faster 

pace." 
Peary  Brug 

Student  Representative 

consultants'  relations  with  the 
university. 

Mack  would  not  comment 
extensively  on  how  talks  with 
the  university  are  progressing, 
but  he  did  say  they  were  a  top 
priority. 

"I  think  a  big  part  of  my  job  is 
to  reunite  positive  relationships 
with  other  campus  entities.  The 
perception  in  the  past  was  that 
ASUCLA  was  fiercely  indepen- 
dent," Mack  said. 

"I'd  like  to  see  more  coopera- 
tion. I  think'relationships  are 
improving,  and  we  hope  to 
improve  them  further,"  he  con- 
tinued. 

The  association  hopes  for  a 
loan  from  the  university  to  pay 
for  much-needed  maintenance 
and  improvements.  But  at  the 
same  time,  it  must  balance  its 
legally  tenuous  independence 
from  Young. 

Young  has  said  he  has  no 
intention  of  taking  over  ASU- 
CLA, but  he  also  has  no  qualms 
doing  so  if  the  association  can't 
effectively  manage  its'ilf 

"I  will,  as  always,  do  whatever 
is  necessary  to  see  that  the  stu- 
dents' interests  and  the  universi- 
ty's interests  are  protected,"  he 
said. 


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FORUM 


From  page  3 

the  UC  Office  of  the  President 

'The  impetus  for  all  this  comes 
from  a  desire  by  the  Academic 
Council  to  try  and  present  as  many 
of  the  concepts  swirling  around 
affirmative  action  as  they  can  ...  and 
to  do  it  in  a  scholarly  context," 
Colvin  said. 

"That  is  especially  critical  when 
you  have  a  topic  ...  that  has  become 
politicized  and  is  a  hot  button  issue 
for  a  lot  of  people,"  he  continued. 
"The  council  tried  to  recruit  speak- 
ers from  all  sides  of  the  issue  from 
moderate  to  conservative,  whatev-  - 
er,"  Colvin  said. 

On  one  end  of  the  spectrum  is 
Wood,  the  executive  director  of  the 
California  Association  of  Scholars, 
who  will  argue  against  race  arid 
gender-based  preferences  in  higher 
education.  He  will  be  on  a  panel 
with  Alexander  Astin,  UCLA's 
director  of  the  Higher  Education 
Research  Institute. 

"This  is  a  very  sensitive  subject 
right  now,"  said  Charles  Lewis, 
vice  chair  of  UCLA's  Academic 
Senate.  "In  specific  reference  to  the 
school  that  I  have  the  most  to  deal 
with  -  admissions  to  medical 
school  -  are  we  discriminating  one 
way  or  the  odierT' 

Different  perspectives  on  the 
issue  of  affirmative  action  are 
important,  Lewis  added.  "I  think 
it's  awfully  dull  talking  to  your- 
self," said  Lewis,  who  will  be 
attending  today's  forum.  "Perhaps 
it  isn't  often  that  many  of  us  change 
our  attitudes  based  on  what  we 
hear,  but  it  often  stimulates  thought 
processes  that  end  up  doing  that 
effectively." 

Some  of  today's  other  speakers 
include  Paul  Brest,  dean  of 
Stanford  University  law  school, 
who  will  discuss  rationales  of  affir- 
mative  action  on  a  panel  with 
Martha  West  from  UC  Davis'  law 
school  and  UC  Berkeley  law 
Professor  Rachael  Moran. 

"These  are  very  knowledgeable 
people  on  this  issue,"  said 
Goldberg-Ambrose,  who  will  mod- 
erate the  law  panel.     .      ^ 

The  forum  begins  at  9:45  a.m.  at 
the  Grand  Horizon  Room  in  Griffin 
Commons  and  the  panel  continues 
until  5  p.m. 

PANTHER 

From  page  9 

ument  to  the  movement. 

"I  think  the  movie  should  be 
repressed,  not  in  the  spirit  of  cen- 
sorship, but  in  the  spirit  of  rejec- 
tion," Cleaver  .said. 

However,  producers  of  the  film 
also  claim  to  be  supported  by 
numerous  former  Panthers  who 
approve  of  the  fi  1  m . 

'The  film  projects  the  Panthers 
in  a  way  that  is  seldom  seen,"  said 
David  Hilliard,  one  of  the  original 
members  of  the  Panthers  from  1966 
and  chief  of  staff  from  '69  to  '71. 
"(The  film)  stresses  the  politicaL 
and  community  programs.  It  shows 
that  the  Panthers  were  a  real  com- 
munity organization  with  organized 
political  consciou.sness." 

The  movie  was  only  partially 
accurate,  Hilliard  said,  acknowl- 
edging that  it  was  a  blend  of  truth 
with  fiction  and  drama,  but  that  the 
positives  outweighed  the  negatives. 

"{Panther)  is  a  positive  first 
step,"  he  said.  "I  hope  others  will 
continue  the  dialogue." 

Now  that  Panther  is  only  faring 
moderately  at  the  box  office,  Seale 
said  Warner  Brothers,  with  whom 
he  has  been  negotiating  his  own 
film  on  the  Panthers,  is  concerned 
about  the  success  of  another  film  on 
the  Black  Panthers.  Whether  his 
own  film  will  get  the  green  light 

See  PANTHIR,  page  13 


Dally  Bruin  News 


WMiiMday,  IMay  24, 1995    13 


SPONSOR 

From  page  1 

motion  to  responsor  the  IPC. 

Others  disagree. 

"It  was  not  a  political  maneu- 
ver whatsoever,"  President  Rob 
Greenhalgh  said.  "(The  issue  of 
the  bylaws)  has  been  discussed 
since  the  beginning  of  the  year. 
Once  the  elections  were  over,  we 
could  finish  the  work  we  began. 
By  no  means  is  this  a  new  issue 
but  rather  a  closure  in  terms  of  the 
sponsorship  guidelines." 

White  the  issue  of  IPC  respon- 
sorship  has  traditionally  drawn 
large  crowds  to  council  meetings, 
relatively  fewer  people  were  pre- 
sent at  last  night's  session.  Many 
of  those  present  voiced  their  con- 
cerns over  the  IPC's  history  with 
regards  to  the  discovery  of  sexist, 
homophobic  and  racist  songbooks 
from  the  Theta  Xi  and  Phi  Kappa 
Psi  houses  in  1992, 

In  addition,  many  called  the 
greek  system  elitist.  Because  of 
the  system's  selectivity,  it  should 
not  be  sponsored  by  the  student 
government  which  is  supposed  to 
represent  all  students  on  campus, 
critics  said. 

"I  am  fully  against  the  respon- 
sorship  of  IPC,"  said  Christina 
Misa,  internal  coordinator  of 
MEChA  and  Raza  Women. 
'There  is  no  evidence  of  concrete 
changes  with  regards  to  IPC." 

But  others  felt  that  significant 
changes  have  been  made  within 
the  fraternity  system. 

"I  feel  very  positively  towards 
the  issue  of  representation,  but  I 
am  sad  and  disappointed  that  all 
members  of  the  campus  have  not 
been  able  to  .see  the  changes  with- 
in IPC  that  I  have  been  able  to," 
Chao  said. 

'This  just  shows  to  me  that  we 
have  some  more  work  to  do.  1 
hope  (the  responsorship)  will 
bring  us  closer  to  the  student 
advocacy  groups  that  we  have 
been  distanced  from  in  the  past." 

Although  the  majority  of  coun- 
cil members  present  approved  the 
responsorship  motion,  not  all 
council  members  believed  that  the 
IPC  should  have  been  recognized 
again. 

'The  decision  was  pending  on 
the  bylaw  that  passed  before  the 
motion  was  made,"  said  Jeanna 
Yoo,  cultural  affairs  commission- 
er who  abstained  from  the  vote.  "I 
did  not  think  that  campus  repre- 
sentative organizations  should  be 
on  equal  footing  with  underrepre- 
sented  student  organizations  or 
student  advocacy  groups." 

"Also,  this  issue  came  up  in  the 
fall  and  I  did  not  think  that  a  lot  of 
those  questions  or  concerns  were 
reflected  over  the  course  of  the 
year.  A  lot  of  interaction  has  to  be 
made  and  before  that,  we  can't 
keep  making  responsorship  an 
issue." 


The  longer  you  keep  it 


harder 


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PANTHER 

From  page  12 


remains  a  question,  he  said. 

Holmes  said  that  he  suspected 
Scale's  problem  with  the  film  stems 
not  so  much  from  his  portrayal,  as 
with  the  f^t  that  he  is  working  on  a 
competitive  movie. 

Holmes  said  that  he  stood  behind 
the  historical  accuracy  of  the  film 
"100  percent,"  but  cautioned,  "This 
is  only  one  movie.  We  hoped  this 
would  be  the  beginning.  There 
needs  to  be  other  films  for  other 
stories." 

By  filing  a  lawsuit  and  attacking 
the  film  so  vigorously.  Holmes  said 
that  Settle  was  working  against  his 
own  best  interests. 

"(Scale's  efforts)  prevent  people 
from  seeing  the  movie  and  make  it 
less  likely  that  Warner  Brothers  and 
others  will  make  films  about  the 
Black  Panthers,"  Holmes  said. 


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♦Lynn  Allen  Jeter,  Lynn  Allen  Jeter  and  Associates 
♦Tyler  Collins,  singer 


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Dq  you  have  questionf  aBout: 


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14    WMtnesday,  May  24, 1995 


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Viewpoint 


Column 


Religion  can  deiiver  us  from  ttie  moutits  of  lions 


Aaron 
Howard 


Like  Daniel  in  the  lion's  den, 
we  were  cast  into  a  realm  of 
ruthless  beasts.  Except  the 
lions  mouths  weren't  closed.  They 
tore  us  apart.  We  were  the  prey, 
and  they  were  the  predator. 

Except  with  these  lions,  their 
weapon  wasn't  the  fang,  it  was  the 
whip.  Instead  of  the  claw,  we  felt 
the  noose.  Instead  of  a  roar,  we 
heard  "nigger."  The  lion's  death 
grip  became  the  white  man's 
penis,  as  he        ^hhhhhhh^^h 
raped  our 
helpless  moth- 
ers and  sold 
his  own  chil- 
dren away. 
When  we  ran, 
the  lion  cha.sed 
us.  When  he 
caught  us,  he 
killed  us.  And 
the  lions 
enjoyed  it. 
Our  cries 

made  them         

laugh.  Our 

struggles  were  their  sport.  The 
white  folks  made  us  the  zebra. 
And  they  almost  got  us  all. 

But  out  of  the  ashes  rose  up 
such  greats  as  Harriet  Tubman 
and  Sojourner  Truth.  Out  of 
despair's  domain  rose  up  leaders 
and  revolutionaries  like  Nat 
Turner.  We  were  cornered  by 
lions,  but  like  Claude  McKay 
said,  "If  we  must  die,  let  us  nobly 
die."  And  yes,  we  died  nobly.  We 
died  like  the  Christian  martyrs  of 
the  past  ...  still  believing  God 
would  deliver  us  from  the  mouth 
of  the  lion  and  elevate  us  to  anoth- 
er plane. 

But  God  did  deliver  us.  And  he 
delivered  because  we  still  took  the 
lime  to  trust  him.  Although  four 
little  girls  were  bombed  while 
they  were  in  church,  we  yet  went 
back  to  church  and  prayed  for 
deliverance  from  the  lion's  den. 
Even  though  we  were  cast  down, 
knocked  down,  beat  down  and 
tore  down,  we  still  went  to  sleep 
each  night  believing  our  change 
would  come.  As  families  gathered 
around  the  dinner  table,  the  father 
took  time  to  pray,  asking  God  for 
guidance  and  strength  in  leading 
his  family.  And  on  Sunday,  after  a 
long  arduous  week  battling  the 
lions,  we  could  hear  the  preacher 
say  that  "Everything's  gonna  be 
all  right." 

I  know  it  may  not  seem  like  our 
deliverance  is  complete.  And  I 


know  it  may  seem  like  things  just 
keep  getting  worse.  But  I  also 
know  that  we  couldn't  have  gotten 
this  far  without  God's  help. 

But  now,  it  seems  like  everyone 
is  dissatisfied  with  religion.  It's 
become  a  ritual.  It's  become  dry, 
boring  and  irrelevant.  Half  of  my 
homies  don't  even  go  to  chi^rch  no 
more. 

Everyone  wants  to  make 
Christianity  the  white  man's  reli- 
gion. Everyone  wants  to  declare 
themselves  agnostic  and  atheistic. 
Or  we  try  to  get  deep  and  find  the 
spirit  that  dwells  within  all  of  us. 
And  that's  all  right  too.  But  some 
of  us  ain't  even  trying  to  find  that 
spirit.  A  lot  of  us  don't  even  pay 
attention  to  our  spiritual  beings. 
We  .satisfy  ourselves  physically, 
through  such  measures  as  sex  and 
weed.  But  do  we  ever  stop  to  sat- 
isfy ourselves  spiritually? 

Even  Malcolm  X,  who  recog- 
nized we  were  prey  living  in  a  den 
of  lions,  knew  he  had  to  have  faith 
in  someone  greater.  Even  he 
adhered  to  principles  of  morality, 
self-respect  and  dignity.  He  was- 
n't a  Christian,  but  that's  not  the 
point.  He  addressed  his  spiritual 
needs  before  he  addressed  his 
people's  needs.  He  didn't  go 
about  being  a  Muslim  in  a  half- 
hearted and  complacent  way.  He 
dedicated  his  life  to  abiding  by  the 
principles  that  he  was  taught.  He 
put  his  faith  in  something  beyond 
logistics  and  physics  and  by  doing 
that,  he  became  the  leader  of  a 
people.  He  became  the  conscience 
for  this  nation. 

And  then  we  wonder  why  our 
progress  seems  like  it  has  been 
reversed.  Poverty  is  on  the  rise. 
Unemployment  is  on  the  rise. 
Crime  is  on  the  rise.  Teenage 
pregnancies  are  on  the  rise. 
Suicides  are  on  the  rise. 
Everything's  on  the  ri.se  except 
our  spiritual  and  moral  con- 
science, because  that  is  declining. 
We  don't  take  the  time  to  pray.  We 
don't  take  the  time  to  give  and 
love  one  another  like  Jesus  did. 
We  don't  take  the  time  to  teach 
our  fellow  brothers  and  sisters 
about  unity  and  cohesion  like 
Gandhi  did  in  India.  We  don't  take 
the  time  to  give  of  ourselves  like 
Dr.  King.  We're  not  driven  by  love 
for  something  greater  than  the 
tangible  and  concrete.  Hedonism 
is  the  name  of  the  game  and  we're 
determined  to  see  who  can  take  it 
to  its  fullest  capacity. 


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EdHofM  Bowd . 

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Managing  EcHtOf 

JannMaf  Laa 

NawaEdHof 

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Vlwwpotnl  CdHor 

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After  Hour*  EdHor 

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(MgnOtaMor 

BftanNo 

rnvMv^^pnff  mmwBm 

Andraw  ScMar 

ArtlMfMlor 

JinoOh 

Jarry  WaNzman 

And  that's  why  the  lions  are 
still  on  us  today.  The  Nation  of 
Islam  knows  this.  They  know  that 
the  only  way  we  can  get  out  of 
this  den  of  lions  is  if  we  pray  to 
God  and  do  his  will.  Then  can  we 
address  the  social  ills  of  society.  If 
you  look  at  the  work  the  Nation  of 
Islam  is  carrying  out,  they're 
doing  a  fabulous  job  at  rescuing 
young  brothers  and  sisters  from 
lives  of  shame  and  juvenile  delin- 
quency and  introducing  them  to  a 
higher  power  that  gives  them  a 
new  lease  on  life. 

How  come  we  as  Christians 
can't  get  a  clue?  The  lions  want  us 
for  their  next  meal  and  we're 
lying  belly-up,  ready  to  be  taken. 
We  offer  ourselves  as  sacrifices 
unless  we  go  back  to  what  has 
brought  us  this  far.  We're  allowing 
our  bones  to  be  licked  clean 
unless  we  counterattack  with 
something  greater  than  any  lion's 
strength.  Unless  we  return  to  a 
greater  King  than  Simba,  I  don't 
know  if  we  can  escape  a  hyena's 
fate. 

I'm  not  trying  to  preach.  I  just 
want  the  unity  and  focus  that  we 
once  had.  Maybe  I'm  wrong. 
Maybe  all  this  rambling  has  just 


been  a  smokescreen  for  the  true 
problem  we  face  and  need  to 
address.  But  all  I  know  is  that 
there's  something  about  a  praying 
man  you  have  to  respect.  There's 
something  about  that  praying 
woman  you  have  to  respect.  When 
the  going  is  too  hard  for  them  to 
bear,  they  let  God  bear  their  bur- 
dens and  they  come  back  to  the 
battlefield  ready  to  fight  one  more 
time.  After  they  pray  they  regain 
strength,  assurance  and  the  hope 
that  joy  is  truly  coming  in  the 
morning. 

It's  still  night  time. 

We  as  a  people  are  yet  enduring 
the  trials  of  the  night.  We  weep 
for  those  black  men  lost  to  the 
gun  barrels  of  the  police.  We 
weep  for  our  little  giri  that  lays  in 
a  coffm  with  the  bullet  hole  from 
Soon  Ja  Du  still  in  her  skull.  We 
weep  for  our  political  prisoners 
that  the  federal  government  does- 
n't want  you  to  know  about. 

And  we  keep  weeping,  hoping 
the  crimson  wave  that  accompa- 
nies the  sunrise  will  be  seen  com- 
ing over  the  horizon.  We  keep 
weeping,  hoping  that  someday  the 
sun  will  dry  our  tears  away,  cuz 
Annie  was  lying.  We  haven't  seen 


the  sun  for  a  long  time. 

But  as  we  weep,  let's  pray.  As 
we  weep,  let's  trust  in  someone 
greater.  Your  denomination  does- 
n't matter.  Your  religious  focus 
can  be  what  you  feel  is  right  for 
you.  But  as  we  are  faced  all  about 
by  lions,  know  we  can't  do  it 
alone.  Our  salvation  is  not  with 
our  ability  alone,  but  with  our 
ability  plus  the  empowerment  of 
God. 

As  I  often  Wonder,  Stevie  talks 
to  me.  But  this  time,  I  heard  the 
Winans  say  something  to  me. 
They  said,  "He  bottles  up  every 
tear,  understands  every  fear,  so  we 
must  put  our  trust  in  God.  Even 
though  sometimes  the  load  may 
make  you  feel  your  life  is  almost 
gone.  Just  look  up.  Tomorrow's 
sun  will  let  you  know  your  life's 
not  done." 

Let's  go  back  to  church.  And 
our  deliverance  from  the  mouths 
of  the  lions  will  soon  follow. 

Happy  one  year,  Malihda. 
Peace. 

Howard  is  a  third-year 
anthropology  student.  His 
columns  appear  on  alternate 
Wednesdays. 


Daily  Bruin  Viewpoint 


Viewpoint 


Wednesday,  May  24, 1995    15 


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UCLA's  race-based  admissions  must  lie  clianged 


By  Shechao  Charles  Feng 

We  should  all  be  aware  by  now  of  the 
current  debate  raging  here  at  UCLA  about 
the  university's  policy  on  affirmative 
action.  It  is  my  opinion  that  the  informa- 
tion available  to  the  academic  public  has 
been  somewhat  unclear,  and  as  a  result  the 
discussion  so  far  has  been  dominated  by 
emotional  exchanges  or  "shouting  match- 
es," not  by  rational  debates. 

I  did  some  personal  research  on  the  sub- 
ject of  UCLA's  current  affirmative  action 
program  in  relation  to  undergraduate 
admissions.  It  is  my  main  goal  in  this  arti- 
cle to  share  my  findings  with  the  iJCLA 
community  and'to  give  my  criticisms  of 
the  current  system,  as  well  as  to  offer  con- 
crete, rational  suggestions  as  to  how  we 
might  go  about  improving  the  system  in 
order  to  make  it  more  equitable  and  fair. 

The  following  is  a  summary  of  the  rele- 
vant data  I  uncovered  pertaining  to 
UCLA's  affirmative  action-based  under- 
graduate admissions  procedure.  I  will  use 
the  1994  freshman  class  as  an  example: 

During  the  1994-95  season,  approxi- 
mately 20,000  high  school  graduates 
applied  to  UCLA.  That  number  exceeds 
the  number  of  applicants  to  Berkeley  and 
all  other  UO campuses  by  more  than  3,000 
students,  thus  making  UCLA  the  most 
popular  UC  campus  for  California  high 
school  graduates.  (We  should  be  proud!) 

These  applicants  were  divided  into  vari- 
ous groups  based  on  high  school  GPA, 
SAT  scores,  number  of  honors  courses, 
senior  year  curriculum,  etc.  To  simplify 
the  information,  let  me  refer  to  these 
groups  based  on  academic  ranking  as  A  - 
D. 

Group  A  densists  of  about  5,600  appli- 


The  present  system  could  be 

characterized  by  many  as 

inconsistent  with  the  basic 

principles  of  equal  opportunity 

and  non-discrimination  . . . 

cants  with  an  average  4.2  high  school  GPA 
and  an  average  total  SAT  score  of  1 ,250. 
These  applicants  were  immediately  admit- 
ted to  UCLA,  irrespective  of  any  other 
considerations.  About  1,500  from  this 
group  actually  chose  to  attend  UCLA  as 
freshmen,  making  up  45  percent  of  1994's 
incoming  class. 

Now  for  Group  B,  students  who  com- 
prise about  27  piercent  of  our  1994  fresh- 
man class. 

Approximately  4,400  from  this  group 
applied  to  UCLA  in  1994,  with  an  average 
4.0  high  school  GPA  and  an  1,120  on  the 
SAT.  In  my  opinion,  these  scores  still 
qualify  them  as  an  academically  meritori- 
ous group.  However,  in  contrast  to  Group 
A,  slightly  fewer  than  half  of  these  appli- 
cants were  offered  UCLA  admission. 

How  did  this  process  of  elimination  take 
place?  It  was  done  using  a  supplementary 
ranking  system,  which  starts  out  with  an 
objective  scale  for  measuring  an  appli- 
cant's economic  disadvantage  level.  It  is 
based  on  numerical  (but  self-reported) 
data,  such  as  low  family  income,  parental 
education  levels,  etc. 

The  ranking  also  includes  a  strictly 
race-based  "renormalization"  table,  in 
which  by  definition,  being  African 


American  or  Chicana/o  entitles  an  appli- 
cant to  be  considered  maximally  disadvan- 
taged, irrespective  of  family  income  or 
any  other  objective  disadvantage  criterion. 
For  example,  an  African  American  or 
Chicana/o  applicant  from  an  affluent  back- 
ground who  normally  would  receive  the 
second-least  level  of  economic  disadvan- 
tage is  automatically  "re-assigned"  the  lop 
supplemental  rank.  Race  and  ethnicity, 
therefore,  play  overriding  roles  in  our  pre- 
sent affirmative  action-based  undergradu- 
ate admissions  policy. 

This  new  race-adjusted  supplemental 
ranking  is  then  used  with  academic  rank- 
ing to  admit  applicants.  The  net  result  of 
this  system  is  essentially  that  a  candidate 
who  is  white  or  non-Filipino/a  Asian  and 
in  Group  B  would  be  rejected,  whereas  a 
Group  B  candidate  from  one  of  the  target- 
ed ethnic  groups  would-be  admitted. 

The  distortions  get  even  more  severe  for 
Group  C  and  D  applicants.  These  two 
groups  of  applicants  were  academically  — r— 
significantly  weaker  thari  the  first  two 
groups,  with  an  average  GPA  ranging 
between  3.7  to  3.4  and  an  average  SAT 
score  in  the  range  of  1 ,000  to  900.  To  an 
almost  exclusive  extent,  only  applicants 
from  the  targeted  minority  groups  (African 
Americans  and  Latina/os,  etc.)  have  a 
chance  at  being  admitted,  with  the  heavily 
race-based  supplenoental  ranking  scheme 
summarized  above.  Students  from  these 
two  groups  made  up  the  remaining  28  per- 
cent of  our  1994  freshman  class. 

I  want  to  stress  here  that:  1.)  Applicants 
admitted  from  Group  D  gave  rise  to 
approximately  1 6  percent  of  the  1994 
freshman  class  and  had  substantially  lower 
academic  standing  than  the  50  percent  or 
so  applicants  who  were  turned  away;  and 
2.)  the  race  and  ethnicity  of  those  in 
Group  D  was  an  overwhelming  factor  in 
this  selection  process. 

What  conclusions  can  we  draw  about 
this  procedure  in  place  at  UCLA  today? 
To  me,  it  is  an  explicitly  race-based  sys- 
tem of  preferences  as  well  as  reverse  dis- 


crimination. Who  is  being  clearly  discrim- 
inated against?  Mainly  the  most  academi- 
cally qualified  applicants  who  do  not 
beloiig  to  one  of  the  targeted  minority  eth- 
nic groups.  Who  is  clearly  being  given 
preferential  treatment?  Those  applicants 
from  academically  weaker  categories,  who 
belong  to  the  targeted  minority  ethnic 
groups. 

The  resulting  1994  freshman  class    > 
admitted  through  this  elaborate  race-based 
affirmative  action  admissions  program  had 
the  following  racial  compositions:  7  per- 
cent African  American,  20  percent  Latino, 
43  percent  Asian  American  and  only  24 
percent  white. 

Contrast  this  composition  to  that  of  the 
1994  California  high  school  graduates:  7 
percent  African  American,  3 1  percent 

What  conclusions  can  we  draw 

about  this  procedure  in  place 

at  UCLA  today?  To  me,  it  is 

an  explicitly  race-based  system 

of  preferences  as  well  as  reverse 

discrimination. 


Latino,  14  percent  Asian  American  and  46 
percent  white.  Or  contrast  it  to  that  year's 
high  school  graduates  who  are  VC 
eligible:  3  percent  African  American,  10 
percent  Latino,  38  percent  Asian  American 
and  49  percent  white. 

Affirmative  action  was  first  conceived 
to  ensure  that  historically  disadvantaged 
minorities  and  women  had  more  opportu- 
nities available,  such  as  a  UCLA  educa- 
tion. However,  racial  favoritism  was  not 
initially  part  of  the  package,  as  I  under- 
stand it,  because  of  our  country's  belief  in 
the  ideal  of  equality  of  opportunity  and 
treatment  (as  opposed  to  inequality)  -  for 
all  Americans. 

Unfortunately,  over  time  this  initially 
well-meaning  program  evolved  into  this 


elaborate  system  of  using  race  explicitly 
as  a  key  criterion  for  discrimination  and 
preferential  treatment,  in  deciding  who  is 
admitted  to  UCLA. 

I  find  it  very  hard  to  justify  how  we  at 
UCLA  can,  in  good  conscience,  reject 
those  2,000+  applicants  with  high  school 
GPAs  near  4.0.  How  can  we  tell  them  that 
-  based  on  essentially  racial  criteria  -  they 
will  not  be  admitted,  but  displaced  by 
applicants  >vho  have  the  same  or  less  eco- 
nomic disadvantage,  but  significantly 
lower  academic  credentials? 

I  agree  with  Chancellor  Charles  Young, 
that  fairness  must  be  one  of  the  main 
objectives  of  UCLA's  admissions  policy. 

But  our  present  system  is  glaringly 
unfair.  Let  me  remind  you  of  some  words 
drawn  from  the  Civil  Rights  Act  of  1964: 
"Neither  the  state  ...  nor  any  of  its  agents 
...  shall  use  race,  sex,  color,  ethnicity  or 
national  origin  as  a  criterion  for  either  dis- 
criminating against  or  granting  preferen- 
tial treatment  to  any  individual  or  group." 
The  present  system  could  be  characterized 
by  ntany  as  inconsistent  with  the  basic 
principles  of  equal  opportunity  and  non- 
discrimination, enshrined  in  the  Civil 
Rights  legislation  of  1964. 

The  following  is  what  !  suggest  would 
provide  the  fairness  and  equity  morally 
required  of  UCLA  admissions:  All  appli- 
cants below  the  upper  portion  of  Group  C 
should  not  be  considered  for  UCLA 
admission,  period.  Within  the  resulting 
pool  of  sufficiently  academically  qualified 
applicants,  UCLA  must  use  the  unadulter- 
ated Economic  Disadvantage  Level  index 
to  give  preference  to  those  applicants, 
from  any  race  and  ethnicity,  who  demon- 
strate socioeconomic  disadvantage  such  as 
a  low  family  income.  The  resulting  student 
body  will  still  be  intellectually,  economi- 
cally and  ethnically  diverse,  and  unequivo- 
cally excellent  in  academic  qualifications. 
Of  course,  someone  may  claim  that  the 
student  body  admitted  using  the  method  1 
have  suggested  will  not  be  "diverse 
enough."  But  who  sets  the  quantitative 
standard  on  diversity,  anyway?  In  my 
opinion,  diversity  is  a  concept  that  should 
never  be  taken  to  mean  some  rigid  numeri- 
cal target. 

Just  what  percentage  makeup  would  we 
target?  That  of  the  UC-eligible  high 
school  graduate  population,  cited  above? 
That  of  the  entire  high  school  graduate 
_population?  Or  those  who  attend  four-year 
colleges,  UCs  or  just  UCLA? 

Since  all  of  these  different  populations 
have  different  racial  makeups,  which  will 
change  with  time,  it  is  obvious  that  any 
numerical  target  for  measuring  diversity  is 
essentially  arbitrary.  If  we  were  to  consid- 
er the  racial  percentages  of  all  UC-eligible 
seniors  in  California,  our  1994  freshman 
class  is  in  fact  severely  underrepresented 
in  Caucasian,  not  Latina/o  nor  African 
American  students. 

In  closing,  I'd  like  to  remind  us  all,  in 
this  current  debate  on  affirmative  action, 
of  the  teachings  of  Dr.  Martin  Luther 
King,  Jr.:  "Let  us  be  judged  by  the  content 
of  our  character"  -  and  let  me  add  here  - 
by  our  merits  and  abilities,  and  "not  by  the 
color  of  our  skin."  Let  us  all  vote  for  the 
California  Civil  Rights  Initiative  in  1996 
to  put  an  end  to  this  type  of  racially  dis- 
criminatory practice,  once  and  for  all.  in 
our  great  state  of  California. 


Feng  is  an  associate  professor  of  physics 
at  UCLA. 


•  •> 


Siill  \\i\i\i  io  iio  am  Assisiaiiii  EclHor*? 


Assistant  Senior  Copy  Editor  applications  are  due 

■ 
Assistant  Arts  &  Entertainment  Editor  applications  are  due 

Assistant  Viewpoint  Editor  applications  are  due    I 

For  more  information,  contdct  Roxanc  Marquez  at  825-22  16  or  via  c-mail  at  rmarquez@media.asucla  ucla.edu 


16    WadnaMlay,  May  24, 1995 


Daily  Bruin  Arts-ft  EntertahuiMnt 


Wednesday,  May  24, 1995    17 


Arts  &  Entertainment 


Michael  Tatum's 
real-life  top  10 


What's 
that  Noise? 


r       .      ^ 

f     Jl 

Michael 
Tatum 


Now  that  the  school  year  is 
coming  to  a  close,  the  time 
seems  ripe  for  a  look  back 
at  the  best  and  worst  |x>p  music 
moments  from  the  last  eight 
months. 

1 .  Moby  Everything  Is  Wrong 
—  When  has  there  been  a  record  so 
damn  universal?  Or  a  record  that 
touched  so  many  styles  of  music 
without  pandering  to  the  pop  audi- 
ence? Here,  the  pop  polymath  and 
keyboard  whiz 
embraces  clas- 
sical, punk, 
ambient, 
movie  sound- 
tracks and,  oh 
yeah,  techno 
and  disco.  The 
result  is  one  of 
those  rare 
records  that 
occupies  its 
own  self-con- 
tained world, 
an  alternate 
universe  of 
heartbreaking 
beauty  that 
_  could  only    . 
have  been  cre- 
ated by  someone  like  Moby,  who 
loves  the  world  but  longs  to  escape 
from  what  the  evils  of  humanity 
have  made  it  into.  My  nommation 
for  Best  Album  of  1 995  -  so  far. 

2.  Jewel  Pieces  Of  You  When 
has  there  been  a  record  so  damn 
humorless?  Or  a  record  that  tned  to 
pass  off  banal  insights  and  received 
politics  as  the  wisdom  of  life  expe- 
rience? As  you  might 've  guessed, 
hypersensitive  coffee-shop  folkies 
arent  exactly  my  cup  of  lalte,  but 
even  Janis  Ian  came  up  with  a  more 
mslghtful  verse  than  this:  "Little 
breasts  attached  to/  Skinny  ribs  and 
hungry  bellies/  she  stands/  a  greater 
threat  to  herself/  than  the  cigarette/ 
she  consumes."  Unequivocally,  the 
worst  of  1995     so  far. 

3.  Iris  I>cMent  at  The 
Troubadour  With  her  My  Ufe,  one 
of  my  favorite  albums  of  last  year,  I 
had  high  expectations  for  Dement's 
stint  at  Doug  Weston's  Troubadour 
last  (Xtober.  Imagine  how  awed  I 
was  when  she  exceeded  those 
expectations.  For  an  hour  and  a 

,   half  she  spcllbf)und  the  audience 
with  nothing  else  but  a  piano  and 

• .  an  acoustic  guitar,  and  even  with- 
out a  microphone,  you  could  have 
heard  every  word  that  came  from 
her  gorgeous  voice  from  at  least  a 
bl(x;k  away.The  best  concert  I  saw 
all  year. 

4.  The  History  Of  Rock  'n' 
Roll,  According  tp  MTV  Hven  an 
expert  can  leani  something  new 
about  rock  music.  Take  MTV's 
aforementioned  special,  which 
implied  that  in  the  50  years    . 
between  inventing  blues  and  rap, 
African-Americans  made  absolute- 
ly no  noteworthy  contributions  to 
popular  music.  Like  wow. 

5.  Inflnite  Zero  Until  Henry 
Rollins  and  Rick  Rubin  came 
along,  most  reissue  programs  have 
been  slanted  toward  '60s  and  '70s 
cla.ssic  rcx;k,  presumably  to  lure  the 
baby  boomers  who  supposedly 
make  up  the  biggest  CD  buying 
demographic.  But  with  their  new 
Infmite  Zero  label,  classic  punk, 
free  jazz  and  spoken  word  record- 
ings are  being  made  available  for 


the  first  time-anywhere  in  digital 
format.  The  only  keeper  from  the 
first  two  .sets  (which  also  include 
records  from  Devo  and  Tom 
Verlaine)  is  Gang  Of  Four's  punk 
apotheosis  Entertainment! ,  but  the 
program  as  a  whole  is  an  encourag- 
-ing  industry  development. 

6.  A  Connection  Is  Made  Not 
since  Beck's  "Loser"  has  a  pop 
song  thrilled  on  first  listening  as 
much  as  Elastica's  "Connection,"  A 
two-niinute,  wham-bam-thank- 
you-ma'am  quickie,  it  announces 
itself  a.s  an  instant  radio  classic 
from  its  opening  guitar  sample.  For 
those  who've  been  shirking  on  buy- 
ing the  record,  let  me  assure  you 
that  there's  more  -  plenty  more  - 
where  that  came  from  on  their  irre- 
sistibly sexy  self-titled  debut.  Who 
said  Hngland  was  dead? 

7.  Chip  Fu  of  the  Fu- 
Schnickeas  Always  late  to  the 
punch  on  hip  hop  groups,  1  discov- 
ered the  world's  greatest  rapper  by 
complete  accident  while  watching 
"Yo!  MTV  Raps."  On  "What's  Up 
Doc"  (guest  starring  Shaquille 

.  O'Neal)  and  the  excellent  Nervous 
Hreakdown,  ChipF'u,  the  main 
attraction  of  the  F^st  Matbush 
group  of  the  Fu-Schnickens,  turns 
in  a  virtual  tour  de  force  of 
whee/es,  sputters,  snorts  and  stut- 
ters, all  without  missing  a  beat  or  a 
word.  1  don't  know  if  this  guy 
learned  his  trade  from  watching 
Warner  Bros.  cart(K)ns,  but  I'm 
pretty  sure  he  qualifies  as  some 
kind  of  genius. 

8.  Archers  of  Ixiaf  at  the 
CVM)pcrage  God  bless  USAC  - 
they  delivered  unto  us  the  worid's 
greatest  indie  rock  band  free  of 
charge.  Performing  tracks  off  the 
thcn-unreleased  Vee  Vee,  they 
turned  a  performance  exhilarating 
not  just  sonically,  but  visually  - 
watching  the  manic  Matt  Gentling 
hf)p  up  and  down  and  beat  the  tar 
out  of  his  bass  was  one  of  those 
sights  that  had  to  be  seen  to  be 
believed.  Who  cares  if  he  hit  the 
right  notes  or  not?  Man,  he  l(X)ked 
cool. 

9.  Tori  Amos  at  Ackerman 
Grand  Ballniom  Amos's  new  age 
psychobabble  and  insincere 
believe-in-yourself  Irui.sms  were  a 
given.  What  was  scary  was  how 
many  people  in  the  audience 
bought  her  jive  hook,  line  and 
sinker.  A  few  of  them  (all  black- 
clad,  of  course)  even  melodramati- 
cally thanked  Amos  for  "saving 
their  lives,"  though  it  looked  like 
they  had  spent  the  majority  of  their 
post-redemption  alone  in  a  locked 
room  writing  bad  poetry. 

Moment  of  truth,  from  Tori  to 
the  audience:  "I'm  a  poseur." 

10.  Grant  Mcl>ennan  , 
Horsebreaker  Star  I  admit  it  - 
albums  this  gorgeous  and  lyrical 
melt  the  cynic  in  me.  I  can  think  of 
no  better  way  to  make  my  exit  than 
quote  from  the  divine  "Coming  Up 
For  Air,"  a  song  not  about  how 
music  (or  icons)  save  lives,  but  how 
lives  are  saved  by  interacting  with 
another  living,  breathing  person: 

"Can  you  pull  me  up/  Drop  a 
rope  down  the  hull/  Coming  up  for 
air/  Playing  that  jazz  called  rock  'n' 
roll." 

Tatum 's  column  runs  every 
Wednesday. 


t 


Brave'  new  world 


In  the  13th'century  action-thriller  Bravehearty  actor/director  Mel 
Gibson  has  created  a  film  of  epic  proportions.  Huge  battles  and 
mechanical  horses  also  accent  the  film  he  'always  wanted  to  make.'* 


Mel  Gilwon  on  Braveheart:  "We  photocopied  textbooks  of  battlefields,  of  weapons,  of  the 
way  they  were  used,  how  people  used  to  confront  one  another  and  how  battles  took  shape." 


By  Michael  Horowitz 

Daily  Bruin  Senior  Staff 

Rob  Roy  and  now  Braveheart. 

Although  the  latter  was  filmed  first, 
the  former  made  it  to  release  quicker. 

As  Mel  Gibson's  Braveheart  packed 
up,  they  watched  the  sets  being  built  for 
Rob  Roy.  Two  Scottish  period  pieces  for 
the  bloodthirsty  spring/summer  release 
slate. 

So  did  Gibson  feel  any  trepidation? 

"Well,"  he  smiles  confidently,  "1  read 
both  scripts.  So  there  was  no  competi- 
tion." 

And  when  he  read  the  Rob  Roy  script, 
he  turned  it  down.  "Of  course  I  was 
offered  that  one,"  he  says.  "I  get  offered 
everything  first.  That  day  will  cease 
when  I  won't  be  offered  everything  first, 
1  know,  but  for  the  moment  I  am,  and 
why  Her' 

Gibson's  not  interested  in  meandering 
half-truths  or  half-lies.  He's  heard  it  all 
before,  and  he's  saying  what  he  wants. 
Talking  with  The  Bruin  before  the 
release  of  his  most  ambitious  film  to 
date,  Braveheart,  he  aims  to  fire  back  at 
critics  and  muse  about  an  age  of  warfare 
not  quite  forgotten. 

His  first  directorial  project  The  Man 
Without  a  Face,  the  tale  of  a  disfigured 
man  and  the  boy  he  befriends,  hit  the- 
aters two  summers  ago.  Yet  Braveheart, 
the  story  of  a  Scottish  hero  named 
William  Wallace  presented  challenges 
on  a  different  scale,  including  pitched 
battles  with  thousands  of  extras.  Gibson 
minimizes  the  epic  proportions.  "It  took 
a  lot  longer,  it  took  a  lot  more,  more 
hours,  more  days,  more  people,  more 
everything,"  he  says,  "but  it's  just  what's 
in  front  of  you.  You  solve  that  problem 


and  move  on  to  the  next  one." 

One  of  those  problems  could  have 
been  the  goriness  of  the  violence.  1 3th- 
cenlury  combat  wasn't  known  for  being 
humane,  but  on  the  other  hand,  Gibson 
couldn't  lose  his  audience  by  delving 
loo  deep  into  the  gristliness  of  war. 
Again,  he  dismisses  the  debate.  "I  went 
all  the  way,"  he  says,  yet  "a  lot  of  that's 
been  left  on  the  floor.  There  were  scenes 
in  York  where  they're  hanging  kids  off 
the  ...  It  was  too  much,  you  had  to  pull 
back  on  that  stuff  And  indeed  even  in 
the  battles,  they  were  really  over  the 
top." 

So  over  the  top,  there  were  reports 
that  extras  became  involved  in  real-life 
altercations.  Some  articles  at  the  time 
said  that  people  were  getting  hurt  film- 
ing battle  scenes  for  Braveheart. 

"Nobody  got  hurt,"  responds  Gi;bson. 
"British  tabloid  sensationalism." 

It  took  six  weeks  to  film  a  single  war 
scene  which  the  film  calls  'The  Battle  of 
Sterling."  He  says  they  would  have 
called  it  "The  Battle  of  Sterling  Bridge," 
the  accurate  historical  label,  but  they 
lacked  a  bridge. 

Otherwise,  historical  accuracy  was  of 
paramount  concern.  "We  boned  up  on 
everything,"  says  Gibson.  "We  photo- 
copied textbooks  of  battlefields,  of 
weapons,  of  the  way  they  were  used, 
how  people  used  to  confront  one  another 
and  how  battles  took  shape.". 

The  reason  it  took  a  month  and  a  half 
to  film  a  single  battle  was  due  to 
Sterling's  complexity.  "It's  not  just  a 
battle,"  he  as.serts.  'There's  a  lot  of  other 
scenes  in  it.  It  kind  of  turned  into  a  foot- 
ball match.  The  coin  toss  in  the  middle 
where  they  talk:  *If  you  do  this,  we'll  do 
this!'  They  ride  back  and  then  they  get  it 


on.  It's  cold,  but  apparently  that's  the 
way  things  were.'* 

"In  fact,  back  in  those  times,  more 
often  than  not,  they  usually  settled 
things  by  just  sending  the  leaders  out  to 
club  each  other.  And  everyone  else 
would  just  stand  around  and  watch." 

Yet  in  Braveheart,  few  characters  sit 


See  page  19 
Braveheart  controversy 


around  and  watch.  Both  sides  charge 
into  furious  combat,  often  taking  their 
steeds  along  as  well.  Due  to  the  perilous 
nature  of  some  of  the  horse  scenes, 
Gibson  and  his  fellow  filmmakers  were 
forced  to  create  mechanical  horses. 

"Costner  did  it  with  buffaloes," 
remembers  Gibson.  "He  had  this  one 
buffalo  on  shopping  cart  wheels  that  you 
fired  on  air  cylinders  on  a  track. 

We  thought,  *hey,  you  can't  do 
hideous  things  to  horses.  So  let's  make 
some  fake  ones!'" 

Another  gimmick  employed  for  the 
fight  scenes  was  not  too  technological. 
Before  one  battle,  the  Wallace's  Scottish 
troops  lift  their  kilts  in  a  sign  of  defiance 
to  their  opposition.  Fans  of  the  expected 
Mel  Gibson  butt-shot  will  get  the  rear 
ends  of  his  entire  army.  And  more. 

"I  think  Randy  (Wallace,  the  screen- 
writer) had  them  backflash,  you  know, 
mooning,"  laughs  Gibson.  "Where  they 
actually  used  to  front  flash.  So  I  got 
both."  ^ 


Nudity  is  more  in  context  for  a 
romantic  scene  earlier  in  the  film. 


William  Wallace  and  his  lover  Murron 
(played  by  newcomer  Catherine 
McCormack)  approach  each  other  by 
moonlight  in  a  passage  tenderly  at  odds 
with  the  picture's  bloody  tone.  We  see 
their  breath  in  the  night  air  and  we  won- 
der... 

Just  how  cold  was  it  out  there? 

"A  couple  of  degrees  above  freezing," 
answers  Gibson. 

McCormack  concurs.  "Did  you  see 
the  nipples?"  she  laughs.  "It  was  very 
cold.  It  was  chilly.  But  I  had  Mel  Gibson 
behind  me,  about  to  kiss  me  any 
moment,  so  that  warmed  me  up." 

But  Gibson  could  hardly  warm  up 
each  and  every  cast  member.  The  contin 
uously  rainy  climate  left  most  of  his 
crew  constantly  sick.  "Some  people  had 
the  flu  and  the  sniffles.  We  all  had  some- 
thing for  a  while  ...  coughing  up  things 
that  could  walk  by  themselves.  But 
nobody  wanted  to  give  it  up." 

When  Gibson  was  a  child,  he  had  a 
wish-list  of  films  that  he  went  each 
week  to  the  theater,  hoping  to  catch. 
"There  was  a  film  I  always  wanted  to 
see,"  he  says,  "but  never  quite  did. 

"It  had  something  primal  and  basic 
and  it  had  real  people  and  it  had  a  lot  of 
conflict  in  it,  it  dealt  with  love  and  death 
and  honor  and  sacrifice  and  it  had  an 
uplifting  spirit." 

He  watched  Spartacus.  We  loved  the 
Wild  Bunch. 

"But  1  never  quite  saw  the  film  I  want- 
ed to  see,  but  when  1  read  Randy's  script 
-  it  was  the  film  I  always  wanted  to  see." 

Very  convenient  that  that  film,  that 
dream,  turned  out  to  be  Braveheart.  And 
-very  convenient  that  Gibson  quickly- 
decided:  "If  it  was  the  film  I  always 
wanted  to  see,  I  better  make  it." 


T^ 


Prominent  Hollywood  women  explore  their  roles  in  film 


Actresses,  filmmakers  discuss  how  they 
succeeded  in  competitive  movie  business 


Annette  Bening  will  be  part  of  a  panel  to 
discuss  her  roie  as  a  woman  in  Hollywood. 


By  John  Mangum 

Daily  Bruin  Staff  — 

The  women  in  film  aren't  little  any- 
more. 

On-screen  and  off,  they're  a  force  to 
be  reckoned  with.  Barring  Priscilla. 
Queen  of  the  Desert,  the  all-male  cast 
went  out  with  Shakespeare.  Many 
women  turn  up  in  the  credits  of  films 
as  directors,  producers  and  writers. 

Campus  Events  and  the  Women's 
Resource  Center  have  assembled  a 
panel  of  women  active  both  in  front  of 
and  behind  the  camera  for  "Women  in 
Hollywood"  an  event  which  .seeks  to 
explore  exactly  where  they  are  today 
and  where  they  will  go  in  the  future. 

Lili  Pint  Zanuck,  who  directed 


Rush,  produced  Cocoon  and  won  an 
Oscar  for  her  work  in  Driving  Miss 
Daisy,  believes  that  women  need  to 
move  from  where  they  are  now  to  a 
point  where  distinctions  become 
unnecessary. 

"I  think  we  should  go  on  to  the  next 
phase  as  a  group  which  is  we  no  longer 
need  to  be  ghettoized,"  Zanuck  says. 
"We  don't  need  to  have  'Women  in 
Film,'  women  in  anything. 

"It's  necessary  for  that  kind  of  dis- 
tinction when  you  are  a  minority.  I 
feel,  as  a  woman,  that  we  are  in  a  dif- 
ferent phase  now.  There  are  plenty  of 
us  working.  The  community  is  more 
than  open  to  hiring  women." 

While  Zanuck  asserts  that 
HoIIywopd't  film  industry  has  struck  a 


balance  between  the  sexes,  her  col- 
league Robin  Swicord  still  encounters 
inequality,  at  least  in  her  field. 
Swicord,  a  screenwriter,  has  penned 
such  films  as  Little  Women,  The  Perez 
Family  and  Shag. 

"For  writers,'-  Swicord  says,  "it's 
borne  out  with  statistics.  Absolutely. 
When  you  look  at  the  number  of 
women  that  get  their  movies  made 
every  year  compared  with  the  number 
of  men,  for  women  it's  a  handful  and 
for  men  it's  180  or  so. 

"Everyone  has  their  own  unique 
journey,  but  one  thing  that  we  all  have 
in  common  is  that  there  was  this  great 
lie  which  is  that  the  playing  field  is 
level  and  it's  not." 

Swicord  and  Zanuck  join  actresses 
Annette  Bening  (The  Grifters,  Bugsry) 
and  Christine  Lahti  {Swing  Shift. 
Running  on  Empty),  producers  Laura 
Shuier-Donner  {St.  Elmo 's  Fire,  Pretty 
JaPink)  and  Mimi  Polk  GitUn  {Thelma 


<ft  Louise),  and  moderator  Denise 
Mann,  vice  chair  of  the  Department  of 
Film  and  Television  to  discuss  these 
and  other  issues  in  the  Ackerman 
Grand  Ballroom  at  2  p.m.  today. 

As  part  of  the  panel,  Zanuck  brings 
almost  two  decades  of  experience  in 
Hollywood  which  helped  to  form  her 
opitiions.  She  occupies  a  unique  posi- 
tion to  reflect  on  the  changes  that  have 
affected  women  in  the  film  indu.stry. 

"I  came  to  town  at  a  time  when  there 
wereh't  a  lot  of  women,  but  there  was 
an  awareness  of  the  discrepancy  within 
the  business,"  Zanuck  says.  "People 
understood.  There  were  published  sta- 
tistics regarding  the  low  percentage  of 
women,  for  example,  in  the  Directors 
Guild  of  America. 

"At  some  point,  less  than  1  percent 
of  the  DGA  was  women.  It  was  at  a 
time,  1977-78,  where  there  weren't  the 
amount  of  women  that  you  have  today, 
but  there  was  an  understanding  that 


there  should  be  more." 

These  problems  were  not  specific  to 
Hollywood  in  the  late  1970s.  Most 
businesses  had,  since  their  creation, 
been  the  concern  of  men,  and  movie- 
making was  no'exception.  This  history, 
believes  Swicord,  is  what  women  have 
to  deal  with  in  the  film  industry  today. 

"Most  women  in  Hollywixxl  have  a 
kind  of  common  experience  no  matter 
what  their  job  is  and  what  their  ambi- 
tions are,"  Swicord  says.  "They  face 
many  of  the  same  kinds  of  problems 
that  come  out  of  traditional  business 
methods." 

Hollywood,  explains  Zanuck, 
moved  to  change  these  methods  faster 
than  most  other  industries.  In  her  opin- 
ion, film  "equalled  itself  out  more  than 
any  other  industry. 

"The  liberal  nature  of  the  industry 
allowed  it  to  really  stay  with  the  move- 
ment that  was  occurring  in  the  coun- 
4ry^  Zanuck  ^&.  "Tbcffi'  was  a 


Sicnsitivity  and  an  openness  to  it,  so  it 
isn't  as  if  the  industry  .said  'Let's  hire 
women,'  but  this  country  started  to 
have  a  change  in  its  regards  for 
women." 

As  Hollywood  changed,  films 
which  focused  more  on  women 
became  pos.«ible.  One  of  SWicord's 
most  successful  projects.  Little 
Women,  is  just  this  sort  of  film. 

In  writing  Little  Women,  Swicord 
sought  to  successfully  adapt  Louisa 
May  Alcott's  book,  something  she  felt 
had  yet  to  be  done.  She  didn't  set  oiM 
to  create  a  film  whicl^  affirmed  the 
progress  that  women  had  made  in  the 
film  industry. 

"It  just  cartie  about  that  the  people 
who  most  supported  it  at  the  studio 
were  women,"  Swicord  says.  "I 
brought  a  couple  of  male  directors  into 
the  mix,  people  that  I  was  interested  in 

See  WMMDl.  d^i#  2± 


/; 


4 


18    Wadneiday,  May  24, 1995 


Daily  Bruin  Arts  &  Entertainment 


Marshall  ChaAiman  It's 
About  Time  ...  (Mar^aritaville) 

Come  on  now,  fcss  up  -  doesn't 
a  Tnodcrnized  female  answer 
record  to  Jphnny  Cash's  Live  At 
Folsom  Prison  sound  like  a 
humdinger  of  an  idea? 

Needless  to  say,  this  fails  the 
standard  of  thal4egacy.  May^)*— 
Courtney  Love  couhiiiave-ptnTed 
off  a  live  stint  at  the  Tennessee 
State  Prison  For  Women,  but 
journey  woman  Marshall 
Chapman  just  doesn't  cut  it. 

The  problems  lie  not  merely 
with  her  humdrum  by-the-num- 
bers  traditional  rock  'n'  roll  band 
and  her  frustratingly  predictable 
songwriting  (this  is  alt  she's 
come  up  with  in  the  last  18  or  so 
years?),  but  also  in  her  clumsy 
phrasing  and  shaky  timbre. 

When  Johnny  Cash  got  the 
crowd  roaring  at  Folsom  Prison, 
it  sounded  like  the  inmates  were 
on  the  verge  of  rioting.  When  the 
crowd  on  this  record  cheers,  it 
sounds  like  they're  gratified  just 
to  get  some  attention  -  from  any- 
one. Nadir:  a  rote  cover  of  -  who 
woulda  thunk  it?  -  Elvis 
Presley's  "Jailhouse  Rock."  M.T. 
C- 

Hayride  Elfin  Magic 
(Capricorn)  Although  this 
album  has  its  highlights,  they  are 
too  far  and  few  between  to  grant 
it  a  decent  rating.  It  is  speed 
metal,  yet  without  much  ferocity. 
Eleven  out  of  the  14  .songs  seem 
to  adhere  to  a  recipe  passed 


down  from  one  speed-metal 
band  to  another  -  the  same 
thrashing  drumbeats  that  make 
you  want  to  bang  your  head  on 
the  nearest  mosher  and  the  loud 
and  screeching  guitars  that  send 
you  running  for  the  nearest  ear 
plugs. 

The  apparent  creativity  should 
be  pointed  out,  though. 
"Pleasence"  can  be  accurately 
characterized  as  the  speed-metal 
slow  song,  complete  with  slow, 
melodic  drumbeats,  singing 
trumpets  and  even  sweet,  almost 
religious  organs  totop  it  off. 

This  song  could  make  you 
change  your  mind  about  the  lack 
of  creativity  of  the  album  as  a 
whole.  But,  one  song  can't  make 
up  for  the  rest  of  the  album. 
A.V.  C+ 


Th«  Ev«rty  Broth«rt 
Roat» 


Tricky  Maxinquaye  (Island) 

According  to  popular  theory. 
Tricky  was  the  genius  of 
Massive  Attack,  the  "trip  hop" 
(as  it's  called)  band  of  which  he 
was  a  member  until  they  became 
uninterested  in  his  ideas. 

For  sure,  the  man  has  a  talent- 
ed gift  for  production:  here,  he 
mixes  myriad  records  into  an 
impressive  ocean  of  sound  that 
buoys  surprises  when  you  least 
expect  it. 

Without  a  doubt,  his  avant- 
garde,  non-pop  tendencies  are 
certainly  welcome,  as  well  as  the 
serial-voiced  Martina  who  more 
than  picks  up  the  slack  for 
Tricky's  non-singing. 

But  like  many  a  good  experi- 
menter, he  has  no  knack  for 
coherent  songwriting,  and  even 
worse,  he  favors  sluggish,  brood- 


ing tempos  that  make  Joy 
Division  sound  like  the  Pet  Shop 
Boys  (it's  called  tension-release. 
Tricky  -  look  into  it). 

His  chaotic,  elliptical  cover  of 
Public  Enemy's  Black  Steel,  a 
nightmard  for  those  with  short 
attention  spans,  and  a  bore  to 
those  not  under  the  influence  of 
hallucinogenics.  Classic  couplet: 
"I'll  fuck  you  up  the  ass/ just  for 
a  laugh."  M.T.  B- 

The  Everly  Brothers  Roots 
(Warner  Archives)  With  re- 
issue programs,  you  never  know 
what's  going  to  be  unearthed. 
For  this  installment  in  their  cata- 
log excavation,  Warner  Bros,  has 
come  up  with  ephermera  from 
the  Doobie  Bros,  America,  and 
Seals  and  Crofts,  pretty  good  but 
not-great  early  efforts  from 
Randy  Newman,  and  this  master- 
piece from  1968. 

Having  been  written  off  as 
has-beens  by  the  counter-culture, 
the  Everly  Brothers,  much  like 


the  '68  Beatles,  Stones  and 
Dylan,  returned  back  to  their 
roots,  in  this  case,  the  country 
and  folk  songs  that  their  dad 
taught  them.  Therefore  not  only 
do  they  take  on  some  of  the 
greatest  of  the  then-new  song- 
writers (Merle  Haggard,  Randy 
Newman),  but  bring  the  most 
beloved  songs  from  their  youth 
into  their  present  (even  remaking 
Don's  own  "I  Wonder  If  I  Care 
As  Much"). 

For  concept  and  fun,  they 
intersperse  snippets  from  The 
Everly  Family's  1952  radio 
show.  And  need  it  be  said,  they 
sing  like  angels,  putting  all  com- 
petitors and  imitators  to  shame. 
Put  aside  Simon  and  Garfunkel 
and  rediscover  the  world's  great- 
est singing  duo.  M.T.  A 

Reviews  by  Michael  Tatum  and 
Angela  Vredenburg.  Soundbites 
is  not  threatened  or  jeopardized 
by  Video  Clips  and  will  still  run 
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A- 

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A- 

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To  Bring  You  My  Love 

8^ 

Haardvark 

Memory  Barge 

B 

White  Zombie 

Astro-Creep  2000... 

B 

Elton  John 

Made  in  America 

C4 

Duran  Duran 

Thank  You 

D^ 

All 

Pummel 

D- 

Dionne  Warwick 

Aquarela  Do  Brasil 

F 

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iSL 


♦  «♦',  'Hoa/rtefs"(1988,  Comedy)  Wmona  Ryder  A 
teenager  grows  tired  of  her  class-conscious  peers 


PutoHc  Policy  Conference 


Calling  All 
Sports 


Sports 
LatenightX 


Young  Ones  "Nasty "  The 
lads  rent  scary  videos 


Worid  of  Discovery: 

Cougar  Ghost 


Howard 
Stem 


Howard 

Stem(R) 


Imrention 


Talk  Soup 


Next  Step 


Submarinaa:  Shartta  of 
Steal  (R) 


Gossip  (R) 


Waltons  "The  Whirlwind" 


Malor  League  Baeeball  Baltimore  Orioles  at  Oakland  Athletics  From  the  Oakland 
Coliseum  (Live)  X 


Deslgnlno 
Women  t 


Deslgnlno 
Women  f 


My  So-Called  Life 

Pressure"  (In  Stereo; 


Doug 

Stereo 


L 


Looney 
Tunes 


Ironside  "Beware  the 
Wiles  ol  the  Stranger' 


Evening 
Shade  X 


Evening 

Shade.!: 


Unsolved  Mysteries  (In 

Stereo) 


House  of 

Style  (R) 


Dream  of 
Jeannle 


Love  Boat 


Rescue  911  (In  Stereo)  X 


F.Y.EI  (R) 


Sportscan- 
ter 


700  Club  (Left  m  Progress) 


"Dead/yWedicine  (1991,  Drama)  Veronica  Hamel,  A 


Prime  Time  (In  Stereo) 


pediatrician  suspects  her  trusted  nurse  may  be  a  killer 

Ileal  Worid 


BewHched 


Bowling  ABC  Workj  Team  Challenge 
From  Dublin,  Calif 


Auto  Racing 


I  Love  Lucy 

,X 


Mary  Tyler 
Moore  X 


**♦♦ 


Marcus  Welby,  M.D 

"Feedback"  

NASCAR  "  Chartotte  Sportsman  100 


Real  Worid 

(In  Slereo) 


Taxi  (Pan  i 
of  2) 


In  Stereo) 


Taxi  (Pan  2 
of  2) 


\any  King  Uve  (R)  X 


Poinically 
kicorract 


Russian  TV 


Next  Step 

15L 


Howard 

Stem(R) 


bisidethe 
PGA  Tour 


Saturday 
Night  Live 


Inside  the  Actors  Studio 

Scheduled  Alec  Bakjwin 

Crossfire     lOvtmight 

(5L 


Monty 
Python 


Public  Policy  Conference 


Kids  In  the 
Hall 


Evening  at  the  Improv  (R) 


♦♦♦''j  "The Four 
Feaf/iers"(1939) 


South  Bank  Show:  Lionel 
Ban  Oliver! 


Overnight 


TShowt>iz 
[Today  (R) 


Saturday  Night  Live 

Kieler  Sutherland 


B«yof>d 
2000 


Vldwrfash- 
lonWseWy! 


^SportsosTh 

ttsr(R) 


Fsther  Cowling  Mystsriss 

"The  Mowe  Myste^"  X 


Unsolved  Mysteries  (In 

Slereo) 


Baavisand 
Butt-head 


6ob~ 


Beavis  and 
Butt-haati 


Dick  Van 
Dyla 


Of  Human  Bondage"  (1934)  Leslie  Howard  A 


NBA  Basketball  Playoffs  Teams  to  Be  Announced  (Live)  X 


From  Chartotte  Motor  Speedway  m  Concord.  N  C 


clublooted  medical  student  is  mfalual^d  with  a  woman 
PresaBox    [Rugby 


Wings  (In 

Slereo) X 


♦  ♦•  "Jeremiah  Johnson"  (1972,  Adventure)  Robert  Redford.  Will 
Geer  A  191h-century  adventurer  moves  to  the  Rocky  Mountains 


That  Girl 


That  Girt 


Mod  Squad 


Wings  "This 
OW  House" 


Murder,  She  Wrote  "No 

Laughing  Matter"  X 


Inside  the 
NBA  

It*'']  "Mbrtfl/  Sms'"(1992,  Mystery)  Chnstopher  Reeve 


Pid 
Program 


Paid 


Program 
Up  Close 


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Program 


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Program 


fSi — 

Program 


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Program 


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Episodes 


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Unsolved 
Myrteries 


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Uveal 


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AHematlve  Nation  (In  Stereo 
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♦  *«  "High  Plains  Dnfter'"(1973)  A  mysterious  stranger 
prolects  a  corrupt  town  from  gunmen 


A  priest  kx)ks  for  a  killer  who  came  to  his  confessional 


**  "The  Deadly  Trackers"  (1973,  Western)  Rod  Taytor,  Richard 

Harris  A  Texas  sherilf  tries  to  find  the  killer  of  his  wife  and  son 

Quantum  Leap  "The  Color 


Kojak 


Wings  (In 

Stereo)  X 


FughU 


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Wings  (In 
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Racing 


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James  Stewart,  Murray  HamiHon 


Counterstrlka  "Power 
Play" 


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♦♦v,  ''Sh«/ako"(  1968,  Western)  Sean  Connery,  Brigitte  Bardol, 
Stephen  Boyd  A  European  hunting  party  has  a  runin  with  Apaches 


PREMIUM    CABLE    STATIONS 


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(1%8)  Perry  Kmg 


Kids  Incorp. 


Mickey 
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(4  30)  ♦♦♦  "The  Etficienr.y 
gjrperf"(1991)'PGX 


(4  00)  "What  Did  You  Do  in 
the  War,  Daddy?" 


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mute  townsman  lags  akxig  with  a  mildly  larTwus  outlaw 


Fasrie  Tals  Thsairs: 
Princess  Never  Laughed 


Bsck  to  the  Baanstalk  (R) 


♦  ♦'  J  "Whaf's  Ealing  Gilbert  Grape"  (1993,  Drama)  A 
grocery  store  worker  sacrifices  all  lor  his  lamily  PG- 13' 

♦  ♦V,  "Bom  Yesterday" {\993)  Melanie Griffith  A 
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war,  OaddyVl  1 966)  |  reporter  Mors  a  tycoons  ur 
*v>  "The  Big  sJeep"  (1946)  Humphrey  Bogart  Philip 
rtowe  investigates  blackmail  and  murmr 


*^«  'Jonah  Who  Lived  in  the  Whale" 
1993)  Jean-Hugues  Anglade  'NR' 


version  of  the  genie-in-thelam 


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*♦  "Jimmy  Hollywood' {^994)  Joe  Pesci  An  aspiring 
actor  catches  viMins  on  vkleotape  (In  Stereo)  'R'  X 


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WaN  Disney 
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'A/addm  "(1992)  Animaled  Disney's 

♦  ♦  "Striking  £5is(ance""  (1993,  Drama)  feruce  Willis  A 
serial  killer  stalks  women  lied  to  an  outcast  ex-cop  'R 


Martowe  investigales 


♦*v,  "Quardmg  Tess'  (1994,  Comedy) 
Shirley  MacLame,  Nicolas  Cage  'PG-13' 


***'/i"The  Chma  Syndrome"  (1979)  A  TV  news  crew 
tries  to  report  a  nuclear  accident  they  saw  PG" 


*♦♦  "Road  to  Zanzibar" 
Bing  Crosby,  Bob  Hope 


1941,  Comedy) 


Drawn  On 

(In  Stereo) 


Larry 
Sanders  IT 


'Amos  S  Andrew  "(1993)  A  famous  writer 
IS  mistaken  as  a  burglar  m  his  new  home 


9 
Tombstone"  (1993,  Wsstsm)  Kurt  husseff'^ir 
Earp  and  Doc  Hoiday  battle  the  Ctwton  gang  'R'  [ft 


*** 


Tales  From 
the  Crypt  W 


The  Young  Americans"  (1999,  Drama) 
Harvey  Kettel  (In  Slereo)  'R*  3C 


"W»dlrjip^f  rMse"(1994) 
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Corky-  Zorro  "The   I  EMsgo  Baca  Search  for 

White  [Brooch"  X    |fugitive  (R)  X 

♦♦*  "Oesporare  Howrs" (1990)  MckeyRourke  Three 
escaped  convicts  hoM  a  suburban  family  hostage  'R'  X 


(1993)  Vivian  Schilling  A  psy<^iatrlst 
ility  to  probe  minds  "PG-13  (Violence) 


Fuhire  Shock' 
uses  virtual  realil.      , 

"Scomed^frgs^j  An*ew  Slevehs  Awomin^leiS' 
rever>ge  on  lt>e  man  who  ruined  her  life  R' 


X 


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***v,  "Full  hUetal  Jacket" 
(1967)  Matthew  Modine.X 
"Woman  6tD9Sim^p9SSy 
Bo  Derek  'R* 


Daily  Bruin  Arts  &  Entertainment 


Wednesday,  May  24, 1995    19 


Gay  portrayal  debated 
in  'Braveheart'  movie 


By  Michael  Horowitz 

Daily  Bruin  Senior  Staff 

The  premiere  of  Mel  Gibson's 
Braveheart  today  at  the  Mann 
Chinese  will  attract  more  than 
moviegoers.  The  Gay  &  Lesbian 
Alliance  Against  Defamation 
(G.L.A.A.D.)  plans  to  protest  what 
they  call  "simply  indefensible"  por- 
trayals of  gay  characters  in  the 
Scottish  epic. 

Edward  II,  portrayed  by  Peter 
Hanly  in  Braveheart,  was  gay,  all 
parties  agree. 

Yet  Gibson  and  his  detractors 
conflict  over  the  portrayal  of 
Edward  11  and  his  male  companion. 

"(They)  are  made  out  to  be  com- 
plete jokes,"  said  Sandy  Bodner,  a 
public  affairs  coordinator  for 
G.L.A.A.D.  "Every  time  they 
appear  on  film,  they  don't  even  have 
to  speak  -  the  audience  takes  one 
look  at  them  and  laughs." 

Questioned  about  the  portrayal, 
Gibson  said,  "OK,  I  looked  it  up  in 
the  history  books.  He  was  an  excep- 
tionally insipid  king  and  a  weak 
ruler,  who  incurred  the  hatred  of  his 
own  people  so  much  that  they  killed 
him ...  This  guy  ...  didn't  have  a  clue 
and  that's  what  I 
felt  we  were  doing.  He  also  hap- 
pened to  be  a  homosexual." 


Peter  Hanly  plays  Prince 
Edward  II  in  Braveheart. 

Bodner  contested  Gibson's  his- 
torical defense.  "I  cannot  believe 
that  (his)  make-up  and  lipstick,  by 
any  stretch  of  the  imagination,  is 
close  to  13th  century  reality,"  she 
says.  "It's  a  20th  century  interpreta- 
tion of  a  'queer.'" 

The  incident  that  most  angers 
G.L.A.A.D.  is  a  scene  in  which 
Edward  I  (played  by  Patrick 
McGoohan)  throws  Edward  II's 

See  CONTROVERSY,  page  21 


COME  MEET 

Edward  Manche,  M.D. 

(UCLA  Jules  Stein  Eye  Institute) 

Find  out  about  career  differences  in  OPTOMETRY  &  OPTHALMOLOGY! 

Special  Presentation  on:  RADIAL  KERATOTOMIES 
Also  information  on:  OPTOMKTRY  SCHOOLS  &  ADMISSION 


WEDNESDAY 

May  24,  1995 

6:30-8:00   — 
Geology  6704 


ALL 


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.^i. 


20    WMneMlay,  May  24, 1995 


Daily  Bruin  Arts  &  Entertainment 


FLOURISHING  IIM  A  HOSTILE  SOCIETY: 
THE  LIVES  OF  BLACKS  AND  JEWS 


FEATURING 

DR.  LAURENCE  MGRDEKHAI  THOMAS 


Uniquely  qualified  to  discuss  this  topic  as  an  African 
American  and  a  Jew,  Lawrence  Mordekhai  Thomas  is 
Professor  in  the  Departments  of  Philosophy  and  Political 
Science,  and  a  member  of  the  Judaic  Studies  program  at 
Syracuse  University.  He  is  author  of  Vessels  of  Evil: 
American  Slavery  and  the  Holocaust  and  Living  Morally. 


=a 


WEDNESDAY,  MAY  24, 1995 

Nl 


II 


ACKERMAN  GRAND  BALLROOM 


SPONSORED  BY  THE  CENTER  FOR  AFRICAN  STUDIES  AT  UCLA 

THE  CENTER  FOR  JEWISH  STUDIES  AT  UCLA 

AND  THE  GAY  AND  LESBIAN  ASSOCIATION 

IN  COOPERATION  WITH  HILLEL  JEWISH  STUDENTS  ASSOCIATION.  A  MEMBER  OF  THE  URC 


TT  Cmcoivi  CoiVipUTER 


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Medium  ToMer  Case 
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850MB  Hart  Disk  Drive  (11ms) 
1  44  Floppy  Disk  Drive 
Diamond  Stealth64  PCI  W  2MB 
15'  28Non-lntSVGAMon(tof 
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High  Speed  Sena!  and  Parallel 
101  Enhanced  Keytnard 
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75AIH/  Pentium  Processoi.  3  3V 
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540MB  Hard  Disk  Drive  (11ms) 
1  44  Fkippy  Disk  Drive 
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14' 28  Non-M  SVGA  Monitor 
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2  Senal  and  1  Parallel  Ports 

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SPECIAL  VISCOUNTS  FOR  UCLA 
STUDENTS  AND  STAFF  WITH  ID! 

(310)453-2726 


Lisa  (Claudette  Carracedo,  left)  and  Jade  Li  (Sandra  Oh)  star  in 
Double  Happiness,  a  film  directed  and  v^ritten  by  MIna  Shum. 


L. A.  Asian  Pacific 
film  festival  offers 
f  resli  mix  of  views 


Festival  to  screen 
U.S.  premieres, 
first-time  efforts 


By  Bart>ara  E.  Hernandez 

Daily  Bruin  Staff 

A  cop  tries  to  pick  up  a  seduc- 
tive and  elusive  blonde  in  a  late- 
night  bar,  -only  she  happens  to  be 
the  city's  biggest  drug  dealer.  Two 
prostitutes  must  deal  with  their 
changing  roles  in  the  Communist 
revolution,  while  two  women  fight 
for  the  love  of  one  man,  and  anoth- 
er man  tries  to  bear  a  child. 

That's  only  a  sample  of  this 
year's  fare  at  the  10th  Annual  Los 
Angeles  Asian  Pacific  Film  & 
Video  Festival,  presented  by  the 
UCLA  Film  and  Television 
Archive  and  Visual 

Comnuinications  Inc.  The  festival 
consists  of  U.S.  premieres  of  inter- 
nationally acclaimed  films  to  films 
from  promising  student  filmmak- 
ers. Celebrating  its  10th  anniver- 
sary, the  festival  now  includes 
panels  and  discussions  with  cele- 
brated filmmakers,  as  well  as  qual- 
ity bodies  of  work. 

Kicking  off  the  festival  on 
Thursday  is  A. K.A.  Don  Bonus,  (he 
self  portrait  of  a  18-year-old 
Cambodian  refugee  growing  up 
and  acculturated  in  San 
Francisco's  tenderloin  district. 
Filmmaker  Sokly  Ny's  honest  and 
engaging  voice  makes  this  docu- 
mentary an  appealingly  different 
approach  to  the  American  Dream. 

On  Saturday,  the  West  Coast 
premiere  of  Vive  L' Amour  by  Tsai 
Ming-Liang  brings  youthful  alien- 
ation and  rootlessness  to  the 
screen,  but  with  an  uncharacteristic 
maturity  that  allows  its  players 
depth  and  characterization.  The 
story  progresses  as  the  characters 
experience  loneliness  and  desire 
while  having  sex  with  strangers, 
moonlighting  and  merely  trying  to 
get  by. 

The  U.S.  premiere  of  Emily  Yi- 
Ming  Liu's  Kangaroo  Man  will 
screen  Tuesday,  where  a  biolo- 
gist's wife  loses  her  uterus  and  in 
desperation  to  save  it,  and  with  the 
aid  of  new  technology,  the  husband 
manages  to  become  pregnant. 
Drawing  from  life  in  Los  Angeles 
and  pregnancy,  this  comedy  by  a 
first-time  director  challenges  and 
entertains. 

One  of  the  most  controversial 
pieces  of  the  festivaj,  Chungking 


Express  (June  2)  by  Hong  Kong 
director  Wong  Kar-Wei,  reflects  a 
dynamic  style  which  has  won  over 
many  enthusiasts  this  side  of  the 
Pacific,  including  Quentin 
-Tarantino  (who  is  scheduled  to 
speak  on  its  behalf  before  the 
screening).  Chronicling  the  love 
lives  of  two  cops,  one  who  picks 
up  on  a  cool  blonde  drug  dealer 
(played  by  Brigitte  Lin  Ching-Hsa 
in  wig  and  sunglasses),  and  the 
other  who  is  stalked  by  a  lonely 
fast  food  worker,  Kar-Wei,  injects 
a  little  humor,  sadness  and  beauty 
to  this  stylistic  film. 

Also  included  is  the  L.A.  pre- 
miere of  Canadian  director  Mina 
Shum's  Double  Happiness  (June 


With  over  20  films  to 
show,  and  each  one  of 
equally  entertaining  and 
original  subject  matter, 
this  festival  has  gained 
incredible  momentum. 


3),  a  film  about  keeping  old  tradi- 
tions while  balancing  new  ones  in 
a  new  land  -  especially  when  one 
falls  in  love  with  a  Caucasian  uni- 
versity student. 

Also  featured  is, Blush  by  Li 
Shaohong,  the  story  of  two  prosti- 
tutes who  rebuild  their  lives  during 
the  Chinese  cultural  revolution. 
Friends  while  still  loving  the  same 
man,  their  fortune  shifts  each  year. 
Also  showing  is  a  short  but  aptly 
made  film.  Matricide  by  UCLA's 
own  Quentin  Lee. 

Each  film,  engaged  in  many  dif- 
fering genres  and  varying  degrees 
of  nationalism  and  political 
thought,  shows  the  dynamic  rang^ 
the  filmmakers  are  producing. 
With  over  20  films  to  show,  and 
each  one  of  equally  entertaining 
and  original  subject  matter,  this 
festival  has  gained  incredible 
momentum.  In  a  world  of  prosti- 
tute$,  thieves  and  ordinary  people, 
these  films  reflect  life  as  many  see 
it,  and  not  through  the  blue  con- 
^  tact-lensed  eyes  of  Hollywood. 

FILM:  The  10th  Annual  Los 
Angeles  Asian  Pacific  Film  &  Video 
Festival  presented  by  the  UCLA 
Film  and  Television  Archive  and 
Visual  Communications  Inc. 
Premiering  Thursday,  May  25 
through  June  4.  For  more  info 
please  call  (310)  206-FILM. 


Daily  Bruin  Arts  &  Entertainment 


Wednesday,  May  24, 199S    21 


CONTROVERSY 

From  page  19 

lover  from  a  window  in  a  fit  of  rage. 
"Lest  there  be  any  doubt  that  this 
film  is  loaded  with  bias  and  hostility 
towards  the  gay  community," 
Bodner  said,  "the  last  ounce  of 
doubt  is  swept  away  when  the  father 
throws  the  male  companion  out  the 
window  to  his  death  and  the  audi- 
ence cheers  and  applauds." 

The  character  is  killed  not 
because  he  is  gay,  Gibson  said,  but 
"because  the  king  is  a  psychopath." 

Gibson  said  that  extensive  editing 
limited  Edward  II's  character  depth. 
In  a  three-hour  and  eight-minute 
version  of  the  film,  the  prince  was 

WOMEN 

From,  page  17 

working  with,  but  we  ended  up 
with  a  female  director. 

"It  sort  of  evolved.  I  didn't  go 
into  it  with  a  kind  of  prejudicial 
thing  of  'I  only  want  to  work  with 
the  giris.'  There  are  a  lot  of  things 
that  I  want  to  do  with  my  work  and 
they  mostly  have  to  do  with 
addressing  the  great  human 
themes. 

"It  was  true  of  Little  Women  that, 
because  we  all  understood  each 
other  and  we  were  all  up  against 
the  same  kinds  of  things,  it  was 
very  easy  to  build  an  alliance 
because  what  we  were  allied 
against  were  people  who  did  not 
want  to  make  a  movie  with  a 
female  protagonist  and  >vho  did  not 
believe  in  ■what' we  were  doing. 
That  creates  a  kind  of  solidarity 
right  away  when  you  have  a  com- 
mon antagonist." 

Both  Swicord  and  Zanuck  hope 
to  impart  some  of  what  they've 


explained  more  thoroughly,  but  it 
was  left  on  the  cutting  room  floor. 
"It  had  to  go,  unfortunately," 
Gibson  said.  "It  was  great  for  char- 
acter, but  it  didn't  quite  advance  the 
story  as  quickly  as  it  should  have." 

Bodner,  who  invites  students  to 
join  the  protest  12:30  p.m.  to  1  p.m. 
and  7:30  p.m.  to  8  p.m.  today,  said 
the  portrayals  glorify  gay-bashing 
iq  a  sensitive  age. 

/'When  we're  being  beaten  up  on 
the  streets  of  America,  and  hate- 
crimes  are  rising  in  America,  we 
have  a  problem  with  those  portray- 
als in  the  mass  entertainment 
media,"  she  says.  "It  certainly 
looked,  and  smelled,  and  seemed 
malicious  to  us.  We  didn't  see  any 
choice  but  to  protest." 


D 


W 

5 


lOtliiN)  (Or  mOre  BiislNtSi? 

AdvErti$e.82S-216l 


learned  from  their  Hollywood 
experiences.  When  Zanuck  began 
making  movies,  there  weren't 
forums  like  the  one  today,  and  she 
recognizes  that  programs  like  this 
provide  filmmakers  with  an 
unprecedented  opportunity  to  help 
each  other  out. 

"I've  had  to  learn  how  to  fight  a 
really  good  fight  to  get  special 
films  made,"  Zanuck  says.  "I've 
had  to  live  with  the  chauvinism  that 
existed  at  the  time  that  was  com- 
pounded by  the  fact  that  I  was  a 
third  wife  to  a  major  producer  who 
had  been  a  studio  head. 

"In  all  of  thpse  experiences 
things  have  come  to  me  that  I 
would  now  like  to  share." 


EVENT:  "Women  in  Hollywood- 
presented  by  Campus  Events  and 
the  Women's  Resource  Center. 
Today  at  2  p.m.  in  the  Ackerman 
Grand  Ballroom. 

7.V-^. 


^fSt. 


,^^ 


'tf 


v^ 


'Not  valid  on  Sicilians  or  with  any  other  offer.  Must  mention  ad. 


Exp.  6/7/95 

LARGE 

rf\  PIZZA  w/ 

lOv    Free  Liter 
of  Soda 


8.50 


TWO  TOPPINGS 


TAX  INCLUDED 


Exp.  6/7/95 


8.50 


LARGE 
PIZZA  w/ 
Free  Liter 
of  Soda 


TWO  TOPPINGS 


TAX  INCLUDED 


Exp.  6/7/95 

LARGE 
J-A    PIZZA  w/ 
9U    Free  Liter 

of  Soda 


8.50 


TWO  TOPPINGS 


TAX  INCLUDED 


^J*-  CUP  AND  SAVE        *" 

208-8671 

Offer  good  only  with  this 

coupon,  one  coupon 

per  pizza.  * 

Linnit  3  pizzas  per 
address. 

p^  CLIP  AND  SAVE       ' 

208-8671 

Offer  good  only  with  this 

coupon,  one  coupon 

per  pizza.  * 

Limit  3  pizzas  per 
address. 

p*^  CUP  AND  SAVE       ' 

208-8671 

Offer  good  only  with  this 

coupon,  one  coupon 

per  pizza  ' 

Limit  3  pizzas  per 
address. 


IT'S  FINALLY  HERE... 


SPRING 


Featuring... 

the  UCLA  Gospel  Choir 

with  special  guest  recording  star 

Matthewis 


Saturday,  May  27,  1QQ5 

7:00  p.m. 

Northwest  Campus  Auditorium 

Admission  is  FRBElllll 


Sponsored  htf  Center  for  Student  Programming 


22    Wednesday,  May  24, 19§5 


Daily  Bruin  Classified 


Classified  Ad  Information 


Daily  Bruin  Classified  Information 

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Fax  (310)  206-3075 

We  reserve  the  right  to  change,  reclassify,  revise,  or  reject  any  classified 

advertisement  not  meeting  the  standards  of  the  Daily  Bruin. 

Our  office  is  open  Monday-Tttursday  9-4,  Friday  9-2. 


Classified  rates 

Daily,  20  words  or  less  $7.00 

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Weekly.  20  words  or  less  25.00 

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Display  ads  -  student  rate/col.  i(Kh  8.10 

Display  ads  --  local  rate/col.  IfKh  1 1 .25 


Deadlines 

CIsnillMi  liM  ads: 

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The  ASUCLA  Communications  Board  fully  supports  ttie  Umversily  of  Califomia's  polcy  on 
nofldiscnmlnation  No  medium  sJoll  accept  advertisements  which  presaM  panons  of  any  origin, 
race,  religion,  sex,  or  sexual  orienttUon  ifl  a  demeaning  way  or  imply  thai  ttiey  are  limited  to 
posJUmc,  o^MUes,  roles  or  status  in  society  Netther  the  Daily  Bruin  nor  the  ASUCLA 
Coffifflunicitiom  Board  has  investigated  any  ol  the  services  advertised  or  the  advertisers 
rapretnMd  In  ttils  issue  Any  person  believing  that  an  advertisement  in  this  Issue  violated  the 
Boardt  policy  on  nondiscnminatnn  stated  herein  should  communicate  complaints  in  writing  to 
tt)e  Business  Manager,  Daily  Bruin.  225  Kcrckhoff  Hall,  308  Westwood  Plaza,  Los  Angeles,  CA 
90024.  For  assistance  with  housing  discnminalion  problems,  call  the  UCLA  Housing  Office  at 
(310)  825-4271  or  caJI  the  Westside  Fair  Housing  OffKC  at  (310)  475-9671. 


How  to  write  a  good  ad 

1.  start  your  ad  witfi  the  mercfiandise  your  are  selling.  This  makes  it  easier  for  readers  to  quickly  scan 
the  ads  arid  locate  your  item(s). 

2.  Alv^ays  include  the  price  of  the  item  you  are  selling.  Many  classified  readers  simply  do  not  respond 
to  ads  without  prices. 


3.  Avoid  abbreviations  -  make  your  ad  easy  for  readers  to  understand. 

4.  Place  yourself  in  the  reader's  position.  Ask  what  you'd  like  to  know  about  the  merchandise, 
and  include  that  in  the  ad.  Include  information  such  as  brand  names,  colors,  and  other  specific 
descriptions. 


1  Campus  Happenings 


Alcoholics  Anonymous 

Mon.  Discussion.  Fri.  Step  Study.  AU  3526 

Thurs.  Book  Stucty.  AU  3525 
Ti^s  and  Wed  DUcuJSlon.  Dental  A-3'029 

__i     AH  times  12: 10- 1:00pm 
For  alcoholics  or  indMOuab  who  havo  a 
drinking  pfOt>l0m 


CAREER 
NIGHT 


all  UCLA  .students  welcome 

Alumni  Speakers 

Alpha  Chi  Omega  House 

638  Hilgard 

starts  @  7:(X)  PM 


n 


a 


4  Financial  Aid 


Cash  for  collc^.  900,000  f^nris  available. 
No  repayments,  EVER.  Qualify  ifr^mediatcly. 
1  800-243  2435. 

I 

COLLEGE  MONEY  CUARANTEEDI  1P0'«  of 
millcons  In  icholarehipt,  grants,  aid  &  private 
funds.  Be  smart,  apply  now.  1-80a549-2400 
exit  9101. 


7  Good  Deals 


GRADUATION  ANNOUt^EMENTS  AND 
INVITATIONS  much  cheaper  than  UCLA's 
pncet...Penonali2cd,  25  for  S32.80,  100  for 
S45.90.  Large  selection,  rush  orders  wel- 
comc.  Elegant  Invitations.  310-652-6550. 

INSLiRANCE  WAKI  WE'LL  BEAT  ANYONES 
price  or  don't  want  your  business.  Tickets, 
accider>ts,  student/itaff  discounts.  Request 
the  -Bru in  Plan.-  3ia777  881  7  or  ^13-873- 
3303. 


9  Miscellaneous 


ALPHA  DELTA  CHI 

It  recruiting  Christian  women  for  sorority 
membership.  If  interested,  call  Tracy,  310- 
320-4930  or  Cherylt,  310-471  -2275. 

JOHN  LENNON 

A  philosophical  er^quiry  into  his  life,  work, 
and  influerKe.  9- week  course  commencing 
b^/9S.  Kinko's  confererKe  room,  TorraiKC. 
310-378-0536. 


10  Personal 


••THE  DAILY  BRUIN  ASSUMES  NO  RE- 
SPONSIBILITY FOR  ADVERTISERS'  OR 
CUSTOMERS'  EXPERIENCES  CONCERNING 
ADS  IN  THE  PERSONALS  SEOION. 

ALUMNI  WOMAN 

(BFA  in  Art)  seeks  male  travel-companion  to 
cross  country  this  summer.  Arriving  LA  from 
Hawaii  early  July.  806-334.3910. 

BRUIN  EDITOR  tired  of  laying  out  alone  at 
nigN  seeks  a  Deep  Throat  of  her  own.  e-mail: 
iizyxb5>mys.oac.ucla.edu. 

HEALTHY  ALTERNATIVE  TO  BAR  SCENE. 
Browse  through  perspective  dalcsl  1-900- 
562  7000  ext.  6739.  $2.99/min..  Must  be 
la^yrs.    ProcallCo.    602  954-7420. 

LIVE  PSYCHIC  LINE 

Find  your  futurel  Speak  to  live  psychic!  1- 
900-26^4345  ext- 1693.  24  houri/day.  ISf 
$3.9S/minule,  Touch-torw.  TeleScrvicc  USA, 
301  797-2323. 

OJ  SIMPSON!!! 

Guilty  or  innocenlf  Voice  your  own  opinion 
America.  Call...  1-900-945-9600  Ext- 11 7. 
S1.9^min/1B^  only,  touchloncs  only.  Inlb- 
lervlce.  Studio  City,  CA.  213-993-3366. 

SINGLES  DATELINE 

Find     rom«Kc/lricndshipl      1-900^988  3696 
exl-1879.    Ifl^,    Toudvlonc,    $2.95/minule. 
Call  rxMV  or  record  your  <r*m  mcstagel  Tele- 
.Swvica  USA,  301  -797-Un. 


3  Campus  Recruitment 


3  Campus  Recruitment 


YOU'RE  GETTING  THE  DEGREE, 
BUT  WHAT  ABOUT  THE  JOB? 

Professional  Business  Academy  offers  intensive 
courses  in  Entertainment,  Legal,  and  Medical 
Office  Procedure,  tailored  towEird  griving  the 
educated  individual  a  professional  edge.   We  use  a 
unique  practicum  teaching  method  in  a  simulated 
office  environment,  and  offer  superior  job 
placement.  Gain  the  practical  skills  essential  to 
getting  your  foot  in  the  door  -and  climbing  to  the 
top.  Day  and  Evening  classes. 

Call  now  for  a  free  brochure,  and  add  some  real 

earning  power  to  your  degpree. 

PROFESSIONAL  BUSINESS  ACADEMY; 

1-213-466-2974. 

Fully  Accredited  by  the  Council  of  Post  Secondary  Education. 


i^^^^^^^^^^^^^M^^M^^^^^— ^^»^^         il^l 


12  Research  Subjects 


1 2  Research  Subjects 


10  Personal 


WITNESSES 

BUS  ACCI0Eh4T  VICTIM  seeks  witncsMt. 
1(V24/94,  3pm,  at  Hilgard^econte.  54-yr-old 
Asian  woman,  wearing  green  coat,  (ell,  irv 
jured  henelf  on  Bus  21.  if  you  have  any  .info, 
please  call  Ylnn.  213-735-4422. 

WNTED:  100  PEOPLE 

Lose  10-29  Iba.  in  30  days  and  earn  SSS  do- 
inx  it  100%  Kuarantee.  Call  31 0-281 -882& 


12  Research  Subjects 


BEDW^TTINC  BOYS  7-1 1  yrs.  and  their  fa- 
milies needed  for  UCLA  research  project 
Subjects  will  receive  $20  ind  a  free  develop- 
mental evaluation.  310-82S-0392. 

HYPERACTIVE  BOYS  with  attentional  prob- 
lerra  7-11  yn,  needed  for  UCLA  research 
project.  Receive  $20  and  a  free  developmerv 
tal  evaluation.  310-825-0392. 


NORMAL  HEALTHY  BOYS  7-11  yrs,  and 
their  families  needed  for  UCLA  research  pro- 
ject. Receive  $20  and  have  a  scierHiHc  Icarrv 
ink  experience.  310-825-0392. 


NERVOUS?  ANXIOUS? 
FEARFUL?  WORRIED? 

Research  volunteers  between  the  ages  of  18  and  65 

experiencing  these  symptoms  for  at  least  1  month  and 

in  relatively  good  health  are  needed.  Volunteers  will 

receive  a  brief  exam  in  order  to  determine  eligibility. 

Qualified  volunteers  receive  free  basic  physical 

exam/lab  test  and  compensation  up  to  $495.^^. 


California!  CLiNiCAJL  TRiALSJ 


MEDICAL  GROUP 

Please  call  1-800-854-3902 


COUPLES  NEEDED 

Rcacarch  on  personality,  compatablllty.  Free 
phone  consultation  offered  regarding  dynam- 
ics of  rclatlonthip  bated  on  test  rasulU.  Ccri, 
310-281 -6533. 


DEPRESSED?? 

AND  A  STUDENT  OVER  20  YEARS/  Earn 
S20  In  2-hour  study  on  relationship  betwven 
physiolagical  activity  Mnd  imagiery.  Call  lean, 
310-S25-0252. 


Licensed  Piycholherapist  working  on  doctor- 
al-ditaertadon  interested  in  irviividuals  who 

SMri«>oed  childhoiMl  abtac  and  neglect 
uh-childrcn  of  alcoholica,  eating  disordeii, 
victims  of  IfKcst,  crKouraged  to  participate. 
FfM  oorauHalion  and  evaluation.  Voiccmall 
310-284-4881,  office  213-658-7213. 

— ■ : *» ■■ ^— — 


Psychology  Study 

Adult  children  of  psychologists,  psychiatrists, 
other  physicians,  health  professionals,  clergy 
war>ted  for  brief  study.  Compensation.  Call 
Mike,  818-980-0450. 

SMOKERS  STUDY 

In  good  health,  18-55,  wanted  for  snwking 
cetsathm  using  food  supplements.  All  partic- 
iparHs  receive  free  tfeatment  with  nicotine 
gum.  Call  310-824-6671. ■ 

SUBJECTS  NEEDED 

Male  SubjccU,  18-35,  needed  for  study.  In- 
vofves  loud  rtoise,  electrical  stimulation, 
Mood  draw.  $5(y90-minutes.  Call  Wen- 
dy/Slephanie,  310-824-6976. 

VOLUNTEERS  NEEDED  FOR  cardiac  mag- 
netic resonarKe  imaging  research.  $10^  (4 
houn  max.).  Call  310-824.6714  from  Banv 
4pm  or  pa«e  31 0-777-1 71 9i. 


13  Rides  Offered 


DRIVE  OUR  CAR 

frpm  LA  to  the  East  Coast  One  to  New  Eng- 
land, one  to  D.C  Early/Mid  June.  310-556- 
5648. 


15  Wanted 


GRAD  TIX 

Graduation  Tickets  Needed.  Social  Sciences 
Cercmoryy  at  Pauley  on  ^1 8.  Needed  for  loU 
of  relatives.  Willing  to  pay.  21 3-734-4568. 


16  Lost  and  Found 


FCXJND,  ON  MAY  8TH,  Black  male  puppy 
w/collar  in  parking  lot  14.  310-206-5657. 


19  Spernn/Egg  donors 


EGG  DONORS  NEEDED,  ages  20-32,  for  in- 
fertile couples.  Generous  comperwation. 
Leave  name,  address,  telephone  number  for 
infofmalion  and  application.  310-273-4827. 

EGG  DONORS  NEEDED.  All  info  confiden- 
tial.  Please  call  310-285-0333. 

EGG  DONORS  NEEDED:  Healthy  females 
between  21-34years  old  w/medical  in- 
surance. Payment  of  $2200  for  medical  pro- 
cess. Mirna  Navas  310-829  6782,  Monday- 
Ffiday. 

Pteate  help  infertile  Japanese-American.  Will 
pay  medical  expenses  arvi  S2,SO0  to 
Japartcsc,  Ko««an,  or  Chinese  egg  donor. 
Grad  students  call  (213)765-5300.  Use  code 
BH. 

SPERM  DONORS  needed  for  anonymous 
donor  program  at  one  of  the  largest  sperm 
banks  in  the  country,  earn  up  to  $420^nrK>.  If 
qualified.  Contact  HcMi  at  the  California 
Cryobank  310-443-5244.  ext  24. 


22  Healfh)  Services 


ALONE-STRESSED-OVERWHELMED.  Sup- 
portive counseling.  Confidential.  kxJividuals, 
couples,  groups.  Adjacent  to  campus.  Carole 
Chaain  MA.  MFCC.  310-289-4643. 

BODY  SCULPTING 

3  TO  5  TIMES  BETTER  RESULTS  wtr  other 
products!  Great  tasting,  advanced  nutritfonal 
beverages.  Call  todayl  818-594-3358. 


DEPRESSION?  STRESS?  RELATIONSHIP 
PROBLEMS?  PARENTING  ISSUES?  Individu- 
al, couple,  family  therapy  for  adults,  adoles- 
cerHs,  children,  19  yean  clinical  experieiKe. 
Accept  most  mar>aged  care  arvl  irwurv^ce 
plans.  Reasonable  rales.  Westwood  Village. 
Steven  Chcmwn,  L.CJ.W.  M.F.C.C.  310- 
837-9277. 

IMPROVE  MEMORY... 

mental  clarity,  physical  stamina,  digestion. 
May  control  strvM,  anxiety,  PMS,  depressfon. 
All  natural,  organic.  30-day  guarantee. 
Call  1  -800-927-2527x2734. 


PSYCHOTHERAPY 

CLINICAL  PSYCHOLOGIST  (psy140H2) 
trairwd  at  UCLA  offers  time-limited  psycho- 
therapy focused  on  removing  blocks  to  aca- 
demic and  work  efficiency,  and  posHlw^  rela- 
tionships. Ideal  (or  students  arwJ  faculty  high- 
ly motivated  to  change.  S^liding  scale.  3ia 
273-3864. 

SENSUAL  MASSAGE 

120  SPECIAL  FOR  WOMEN  ONLY.  Relaxing 
foil  body,  sensual  massage  by  Italian  man. 
GemfortabU  Anoaphera.  310-479-8434. 


Daily  Bruin  Classified 


13  Rides  Offered 


13  Rides  Offered 


CAR 


Tel:  (310)446-9964 

(800)900-8850 


10687  Santa  Monica  Blvd.  #8  Lx)s  Angles,  CA  90025 

B€Sr  RRT6S  RND  S€RVIC€ 
FOR  CRR  R€NTniS 

SPECIAL  HOLIDAY,  WEEKEND,  AND  WEEKLY  RATES 

UNDER  25  OK  -  CASH  DEPOSIT  OK-  NO  CREDIT  CARD 

NECESSARY 

FREE  PICK  UP  AND  DROP  OFF 


20%  Dl 

to  UCLA  students  and  faculty 

or  free  upgrade 

on  basic  CAR  RENTAL 


present  coupon  at 


I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
mention  i 


pnisBmcouponm     f^^iW    AAgT   OfliC/l  mentiom 

[theme oijem      W lUj  440- V Vo4       code  1275 1 


u 


22  Health  Services 


STUDENT  RATES 

Psychotherapy/counseling  by  Bruin  alum. 
Couples-individuals.  Call  for  free  coraulu- 
tion.  Sliding  scale.  Liz  Could.  IMFi  17869. 
Arlen  Ring,  Ph.D.  -supervisor,  PSYMOTO. 
31 0-578- S9S7;  pager,  310-572-4092.  Con- 
venient WestvMDod  location. 


23  Beauty  Services 


IMAGE  MAKEOVER 

First  impressions  counti  Rem«mbcr  you'll 
rwver  have  a  second  charKe  to  make  a  first 
impression.  BeautiControl's  computer  assist- 
ed analysis  sho«M  you  how  to  look  your  very 
best.  PERSONAL  IMAGE  PROFILE  $200.00. 
Graduate  special  S69.00.  818-759-1535. 

SUPER  1  NAILS 

Student  discount  wAKlA  ID.  1735  West- 
wood  Blvd.  310-478-2702.  Open  7  days  a 
week.  Free  parkins  under  Ross. 


30  Help  Wanted 


MODELS  NEEDED 

PETITE  AND  TALL,  men  «xl  women.  Earn 
$1  SOQ/day,  fashion  clienU  include  Benetton. 
No  experience  necessary.  310-551  -1 823. 

$7/hour  +  BONUS 

Flexible  houn,  UCLA  Annual  Fund.  Call, 
310-794-0277. 


ACCOUNTING 

Growing  compar>y  seeks  lr>dividual  wA>ack- 
gouncVrn^or  in  accounting,  fovoicing,  track- 
ing of  acoounU  payable/^ceh^able.  Flexible 
houra/Work-at-home  possibiity.  Pay  negotl- 
able.   Divld.  1-800-870-6696. 

ACTOR5^MOOELS.  Auditions  by  appoint- 
ments only.  For  comn>ercJals,  films,  print  ads. 
All  typei/ages  r>ceded.  No  experience  neces- 

sary.  No  fee.  Image.  818-222-9091 . 

ADMINISTRATIVE  ASSISTANT.  Dynamic 
high  profile  norvprofh.  Computer  skills, 
Windows,  WordPerfect,  Paradox.  Fax  or  mail 
resume  w^atary  history:  EVHDF,  1427  7th 
Street,  #2,  S»iU  Monica  90401.  FAX  310- 
458-3937, 


AIDE  NEEDED  FOR 
7-Y/O  AUTISTIC  BOY 

ASSISTANCE  NEEDED  w/daily  Kving,  be- 
havior, general  cognithw  skills.  Full-time  Job. 
Aide  will  work  on  team  w/o(hcr  profession- 
als. Experience  working  w/Autistic  Popula- 
tion preferred.  Perfea  position  if  interested  In 
Special  Education.  Parents  are  a  Stale  ap- 
proved Nor>-f\jblic  Agerlcy  for  Autism.  Staff 
members  have  20-»-  years  experience.  Contact 
310-542-4146. 

ALASKA  JOBS! 

ALASKAN  FISHERY  PARKS  AND  TOURIST 
RESQRTS  HIRING,  earn  great  SSS  this  sum- 
mer, free  transportation,  room,  board,  ^t  all 
the  optfonsi  Call  S£l  919-490^629. 

ALASKA  )OBS  Earn  up  to  $6,000/month  in 
the  fishing  Industry.  Free  trarwportalion. 
Room  »nd  Board.  Mal^cmaie.  No  experl- 
ence  necessary.  3ia2BS.008S.  EXT  A9240. 
ALASKA  SUMMER  EMPLOYMENT.  Fishing 
Industry.  Earn  to  $3,000- $6,000Vmonth 
plus  benefits.  Male^'emale.  No  experier>ce 
necessary.  206-545-41 55  ext  A59346. 
APARTMENT  ASSISTANT  MANAGER.  $200 
deductkm  from  rent  10416  Irerw  St.  Call 
21 3-387-5530.  Pajeer  21 3-828-91 77. 


30  Help  Wonted 


ASIAN  FEMALES 

Shampoo  companies  (Sebastian)  need  atian 
female  hair  models.  All-ages/all  heights  okayl 
No  experience  necessary.  Top  payl  Call  free 
1-800-959-9301. 

ASSISTANT 

for  market  research  fimn.  Full-time/part-time. 
Exposure  to  many  industries,  good  telephorw 
skills  needed.  Call  9am- 10pm  daily,  Mrs. 
Rost  310-391-7232. 

ASSISTANT  PA.  Research,  typing,  filing,  er- 
rands.  MUST  KNOW  WORD/WORD  PER- 
FECT; for  real  estate  investor  in  Bel  Air.  Fax 
resume  310-471-4885. 

Assistant  to  Entertain- 
ment &  Sports 
Attorney 

in  Century  dlty  is  sought  to  handle  varied 
secretarial  duties.  Typing,  filing,  ar>d  phones. 
Exceller>l  communicatiorVphone  skills  a 
must.  Light  dictation  *nd  bookkeeping.  1-2 
years  experience  ideal.  20-22kV  P'^  bonus. 
A4ust  be  highly  organized,  detail  oriented, 
conscientious  *nd  computer  literate.  Fax  re- 
sume arvi  salary  history  to:  Steve  Linett  at 
310-286-1728. 

ASSISTANT.  P/T  mornings  for  computer 
school  in  Westwood.  Need  computer  tnd 
typing  skills,  bookkeeping  and  good  English. 
$9/hr.  310-470-8600. 

ATHLETKVBOYBH  MALE  MOOaS.  Earn 
S15a$300  PER  HOUR.  Surfer,  student,  jock 
types.  Must  be  18-24,  clean-shaven  face,  lit- 
lli/no  chest  hair.  Playgirl-style  magazirws, 
videos.  Nudity  required.  Highiest  $$$,  imme- 
diate payl  BcgirwYcrs  welcome.  Brad,  310- 
392-4248. 

BABYSITTER  P/T  WANTED  FOR  "95  FALL, 
Winter,  Sprir^g  quarters.  4-  6  hours  per  day. 
T,  Th.  Good  pay,  great  kid.  Call  (or  details, 
leave  message  at  21 3-656-3641 . 


BALLOONISTS 

Party  decorators,  kinging  delivery  drivers,  ar- 
tists, party-planning  assistants  rteeded  at  Bal- 
loon Celebrations.  Fast-paced,  ci«ath«  erwi- 
ronnwnL  10920  LeConte,  Westwood.  310- 
206-1180. 

BARTENtXR  TRAINEES.  Earn  $10a$200  da- 
lly. No  experience  necessary.  National  Bar- 
tenders. 213-380-3200,  310-558-0608,  818- 

994-8100. 

BARTENDERVWAITERVWAITRESSES.  Bistro 
of  Santa  Monica  hirir>g  friervily  ar>d  erwrgetic 
waiters,  waitresses,  bartenders.  LurK;iVdir>ner, 
full-time/part-time.  ExperierK:e  required. 
2301  Santa  Monica  Blvd.  

BLENDING/SALES 

Now  hiring  crew.  Smoothie  King.  PTAT. 
11740  San  Vicente  Bkd/Corham.  Excellent 
opportunity  for  studer^lsl  Call  after  Spm, 
310-826-3050.  EOE. 


BOOKKEEPER  F/C 

Full  time,  good  w/people,  Lotus  1  -2-3,  prop- 
erty managemer^  experience  helpful.  Bcne- 
ftU.  Send  Resume  to  M.H.F.  Mgmt.  Co.,  225 
No.  Crescent  Drive,  Beverly  Hills,  CA  90210. 

CAMP  COUNSELORS 

8-WEEK  BEACH  ORIENTED  DAY  CAMP 
PROGRAM;  2-WEEK  HIGH  SIERRA  CAMP- 
OUT.  MINIMUM  AGE  21.  EXPERIENCED 
W/CHILDREN,WATER  SPORTS.  $320|/WEEK. 
310-826-7000. 


Wednesday,  IVIay  24, 1995    23 


30  HelpWarited 


.efpWdmed 


ARE  YOU  ENTHUSIASTIC  ABOUT  YOUR  JUDAISM? 

Would  you  like  to  pass  your  excitement  on  to  Jewish  teens? 

We're  lookins  for  people  just  like  you  to  teach/counsel  in  the 

•95-'96  Dor  Hadash  and  Havurat  Noar  Prosrams. 

'Call  Cheryl  at  (213)  852-6569 


Sponsored  by  the  Bureau  of  Jewish  Education  of  Greater  Los  Angeles 
An  agency  of  The  Jewish  Federation  and  benefciary  of  United  Jewish  Fund 


CAMP  COUNSELORS       Dream  Summer  Job 


CAMP  HIGHLANDS  in  Pacific  Palisades 
June  26- September  1.  M-F.  9:30am-2:30pm. 
Experience  with  children  beneficial.  S^r. 
Call  Andrew  or  Kurt  310  459-4083. 

CAREER 
MINDED 

ECOLOGK^LLY  SOUND  product  brokerage 
seeks  outgoing  career-oriented  individual  to 
help  fill  key  entry-level  positiorw  w/potential 
for  marugem^nt.  Attitude  more  important 
than  experience.  818-447-0331. 

CASHIER,  P/T.  WLA  pharmacy,  experience 
preferred.  Personable,  dependable,  self- 
motivated.  Call  Nelson,  310-839-1 1 58. 

CASHIER/COFFEE  MAKER,  PT/FT  help  want- 
ed for  coffee-cart,  Westwood- location,  ex- 
perience a  plus.  Applicatiorw  taken:  1081 
Westwood  Blvd.  in  front  of  Wherehouse, 
1  Oanrt- 1pm,  Friday  S/26.  818-810-8812. 

CASHIERS 

FOR  HOLLYWOOD  BOWL  RESTAURANT, 
nights  June  3rd-erKi  of  September,  4-6 
nightsA^eelc  Previous  cashiering  preferred. 
$5.25/hour  -«-gratuity.  213-851-3588  for  ap- 

plication. 

CASTING  IMMEDIATELY!  Extras  needed  for 
feature  Tilms,  commercials,  and  music  videos. 
Earn  up  to  $240  per  dayl  No  experience 
needed.  Work  guaranlcedl  Call  today  213- 
851-6102. 

CHEMIST  FOR  Q.A. 

FT  position  open  w/in  vitro  mfg.  company  & 
requires  Bachelor  degree  in  natural  scier>ces. 
Please  fax  resunte,  work  experience  w/salyy 
history  to  Human  Resources  310-453-3050. 
You  will  be  contacted  only  if  you  are  being 
cor>sidered  for  the  position. 

CLIENT  OPER.  MNGR 

Professionals  responsible  for  direct  manage- 
ment of  staff,  all  facets  of  medical  billing,  coi- 
ledions.  Must  have  professional  demearxir, 
ability  to  meet  deadlines,  excellent  commu- 
nication, problem  -solving  skills.  Should  have 
3-f  years  medical  accounts  receivable  marv 
agenwnt  experierKC,  krwwiedge  ofCPT  vnA 
ICD-9  diagnosis  coding.  PosHiofw  b«Md  in 
LA.  Fax  resume  to  31^390-8030  or  call  310- 
91 5-8029.  Medaphis  Physician  Services  Cor- 
poration. 


CLIENT  SERV.  MNGR 

Professionals  who  enjoy  servicing  physiciarv. 
Must  have  3+  years  experierKe  in  medical 
mana^ment.  ability  to  interact  w/physicians; 
exlensivc  krwwlcdge  of  CPT  &  ICD-9  diagrto- 
sis  coding,  managed  care,  capitation,  FFS, 
medical  terminology,  reimbursenwnl  pro- 
cessing. Excellent  communication,  analytical 
&  spreadsheet  skills.  Some  travel  required. 
Positiorts  basad  in  LA,  San  Berrtadino.  Fax  re- 
sume to  3 10- 3908030  or  call  310-91 5-8029. 
Medaphis  Physician  Services  Corporation. 

COMMUNITY  SERVICE  OFFICER  (CSO»  Pro- 
grams are  hiring  for  fall  quarter.  Think  ahead, 
apply  now.  15  hn.  mi^,  flexible  schedule. 
$6.16  to  start.  $6.63  regular  pay.  Must  be 
full-time  UCLA  student.  Call  310-825-21 48. 

COPYWRITERS! 

WE  NEED  a  sharp  business  rcsevchcrAvritcr 
w/great  writing  skills  to  write  Make  Money  at 
Home  reports.  Recorded  info:  310358-7199. 
COUNSELORS,  SWIM,  ARTS,  GYM,  Video, 
Nature,  Ropes,  and  Ridir^  Instructors  Need- 
ed by  WLA  Day  Camp.  Work  wA:hildren, 
have  fun,  and  earn  mof>ey  this  sumrrwr. 
Must  be  resporwible,  erwrgetic,  and  enjoy 
working  w/chlkiren.  Call  310-4727474. 

COUNTER  PERSON-FA-P/TJOB  AVAILABLE 
at  Dryclean  Express.  Apply  in  person.  2461 
SanU  Monica  Blvd.  Santa  Monica.  90404. 
310-829-9592. 


CRUISE  SHIPS  &  VACATK3N  RESORTS  HIR- 
INGI  Earn  up  to  $2,200>Anonth.  Worid  trav- 
el. F/r  and  seasonal  empfoyntent.  No  experi- 
ence necessary.  Call  310-271-4147,  EXT 
C924. 

CRUISE  SHIPS  HIRING.  Earn  up  to 
S2,00OfAnonth.  Worki  travel.  Seasonal  and 
fulUimc  posHiorw.  No  exp  necessary.  For 
Info,  call  1-206.634-0468  ext.  CS9346. 

DANCERS  EXOTK:  w'anTEDI  New  club  is 
looking  for  outgoing  attractive  giris.  OvKers 
average  $25Q^i(t  and  up.  Ifrf,  no  experi- 
ence  necessary.  Call  81 8-765-7739. 

DAY  CAMPS 

serving  Corwio  and  San  Fernar>do  Valleys, 
Simi,  Camarilfo.  and  Malibu  seek  fun  caring 
counsekxs  ar>d  special  instructors  for  nature, 
gym,  honetkacfc  riding,  fishing^alin^  rafts, 
swimming,  sports  aiding,  ropes  course  arwi 
mon.  Now  int«nri«winR818-86S-6263. 


Data  Entry/Edit  on  PC  workstation.  Must  be 
PC-literate  w/strong  keying  skills.  PTAT. 
$6.Sa$7.50/hour.  Send/fax  resume:  Interac- 
tive Search,  5959  W.Century  Blvd.  #1122, 
LA,  90045,  310-641-1676. 

DRIVER 

AND  COACH^OMPANK)N.  Approx.  3- 
6pm,  Tues-Fri.  IO-6pm,  Saturday  (Varies 
greatly).  Clean  DMV,  insurar>ce,  reh,  sense  of 
humor,  reliable.  818-789-7907. 


DRY  CLEANING  COUNTER  PERSON.  Part- 

time^ull-time,  will  train.  Weekday  evenings 
and  weekend  shifts  available.  SUrts  $6- 
$7.5Q^r  plus  free  dry  cleaning.  Apply  in  per- 
son: 1600  Westwood  Blvd.  No  phone  calls 
please. 

EARN  $500-$2500 

on  your  next  casino  tripl  FREE  report.  Write 
to:  Casino  Report,  P.O.  Box  571961  Tarzana, 
CA91357. 

EARN  EXTRA  MONEY 

PT/IT  without  disturbing  what  you  are  pre- 
sently doing.  One  of  the  fastest  growing  pri- 
vately-owned companies.  Call  213-782- 
7065. 

EARN  UP  TO  $1(VHR  cleaning  houses  and 
offices.  Tons  of  work.  Call  tod^  and  go  to 
work  this  week.  Full  and  part-time  work. 
Flexible  schedule.  Work  in  your  area.  Car 
necessary.  Call  today  at  310-453-1817. 


EASY  MONEY! 

Driver  (or  1995-1996  to  pick-up  children 
from  local  school.  Mor>day-Friday  afternoons, 
flexible  iwurs.  Reliable,  own  car,  insurance. 
$8-S1Q/Sour.  310-275-1835. 

EVENT  STAFF 

EVENT  STAFF  FOR  CONaRTS,  sporu,  and 
special  events.  PA.  Work  arourxi  your  acade- 
mic/athletic  schedules.  818-885-7338. 

EXCITING  JOB 

HOUSEKEEPER  wanted,  SM  house.  Channing 
family  w/pcts.  Requirements:extremely  effi- 
cient, good  driver  w/car.  Full-time:summer, 
pari-time:school  year.  Salary  rtcgoliable.  213- 
525-1341. 

FITNESS 
ENTHUSIAST 

HealtfVnutrition  co.  seeks  entry  level/mgr. 
position.  Attitude  nwrc  important  than  ex- 
pericr>ce.  $3-5,00(ymo.  potential.  Call  818- 
447-7455  (or  appointment. 

FT-GETTY  TRUST 

Position  open  \ai  a  resourceful,  ntolivaled, 
arvi  responsible  irwiividual  with  2-3years 
busir>css  experierKe.  Duties  include  a/p, 
tracking  apd  monitoring  coratrudion  costs, 
preparing  contracts,  ar>d  special  projects. 
Proficierxy  in  Excel  required,  strong  aptitude 
in  microprocessing  preferred.  Send  resume 
by  June  8th  to:  The  J.  Paul  Getty  Trust,  c/o 
Human  Resources  -  BPO,  401  Wilshire  Bh^d. 
#900,  SanU  Monica,  CA  90401 .  No  phone 
calls  please. 


I  SUMMER  I 
!       JOBS      ! 

Now  hiring  students  and 

teachers  for  a  variety  of 

temporary  positions.   If  you 

have  office  clerical  skills 

such  as  Word  Processing, 

Data  Entry  PBX. 
Receptionist,  Secretarial, 

Typing,  etc. 
Call  for  an  appointment: 
Westwood         (310)475-7700 
Los  Angeles      (213)386-3440 
Pasadena         (818)796-8559 
Encino  (818)906-1145 

Orange  County  (714)857-1444 

Stivers 

Temporary 

Personnel 

Established  1945 


30  Help  Wanted 


GENERAL  OFFICE 

if  you're  a  positive,  energetic,  and  organiied 
person  who  enjoys  working  with  people,  we 
have  an  excellent  opportunity  for  you.  We're 
a  growing  company  with  room  for  advance- 
ment, tjsuai,  dynamic  environmeru.  Pay 
and  benefits  open  for  discussion.  Call  Susan 
at  310^453-1817. 


GET  PAID 


to  watch  TVI  Exciting  new  method.  FREE  24- 
hour  recorded  message  reveals  details.  Call 
818-77S-3878  Ext-101.         

GUYS  18-22 

Casting  bodybuilders  for  new  superhero  film. 
Send  posing  photo  to  Gary  Williams  CastinfL 
310-473-1543. 

INSIDE  SALES 

Nationally  kr>own  machine  tools  sales  com- 
party  has  opening  at  entry  level  position  for 
assistant  to  national  sales  manager.  Aggres- 
sive, result-oricntod  individual  to  develop 
and  maintain  sales  via  irvoffice  telemarketing 
w/eventual  step-up  to  outside  territory.  SerxJ 
resume:  Attn:)ohn.  P.O  Box  570416  Tarzana 
91357-0416. 

Instructors  Wanted 

Looking  for  bright,  enthusiastic  people  to 
teach  SAT  Prep.  High  test  scores  .required. 
Transportation  required.  We  will  train.  Flexi- 
ble Hours.  Sl^r.  Send  Cover  leUer/resume, 
including  your  scores  by  5/31/95  to:  A  Conrv 
petilive  Edge,  Attn:  Barry,  1 1  500  W.Olympic 
Blvd.  Suit«_400.  WLA,  90064.  No  Phone 
Calls  Please.  

INTtiiN  TO  ASSIST  BEVERLY  HiLLS  STOCK- 
BROKER. Duties  loirKlude  setting  up  ap- 
poirHments,  updating  mailing  database.  In- 
cenlivcbonuses.  If  you  are  reliable  and  ready 
to  work  2-3  aflCfrKK>ns  weekly,  minimum  of 
6  months,  y^r^  resume  to:  Mel  Reiter,  c/o 
Oean  Witter,  335  North  Maple  Drive,  Suite 

150.  Beverly  frills.  90210. 

INTEKNATONAL  EMi^OYMtNT-  Earn  up 
to  S25-$45A>our  leaching  basic  conversation- 
al English  in  Japan,  Taiwan,  or  S.  Korea.  No 
teaching  background  or  Asian  languages  re- 
quired. For  information  call  20<k632-1  146 
ext.  J59345. 

INTERNTIONAL  JOBS 

EARN  UP  TO  $25  $50/hr.  teaching  basic 
conversational  English.  Work  in  Japan,  Tai- 
wan or  South  Korea.  No  Asian  languages  or 
teaching  background  required.  310-28B- 
0212,  EXT  J9204. 


•  •*••••    •• 

SUMMER  WORK 

$10.15  Starting  Pay  Rate 

Part  &  Full-lime  positons. 
No  experience  required. 

Flex.  Hrs.,  Training 

Provided.  Scholarships  & 

Co-Op  Programs  available. 

For  Details  Call: 

Long  Beach  area     .1 1 0-799  1 66 1 

West  LA 

No.  Ca/Bay  area 

.Sacrametitn 

Hawaii 

•  •  •  •  • 


:<  10-9X5-9.166 
408-450-9-571 
916-444  9()96 
808-842-4597 

•  •  •    • 


JEWISH  HEBREW 

and  Sunday  Sthools  need  teachers,  1995-96. 
Good  Jewish  tduralion  and  love  of  children 
desired.  Yonaion  ShuH2  213  852  6570. 

LAW  OFFICE 

Clerical  secretarial  positions.  Musi  krww 
WordPerfect.  Have  office  experience.  Good 
typing  skills,  flexible  hours.  Wilshire  &  Gierv 
don.  310-4754)481 

LIFEGUARDS 

Certified  lifeguards  wanted  for  pool  in  Pacific 
Palisades.  $7  9/hr  Call  Andrew  or  Kurt  at 
310-459  4083.  8am- 10pm. 

MALE  MODEL  for  men's  health  magazine 
ads.  Pays  S200.  Send  photo  of  face  and 
chest.  1 1 693  San  Vicente,  Suite  1  59,  Los  An- 
getcs,  CA  90049. 


MALE  MODELS.  Asian,  Eurasian,  and  ail 
types.  No  height  requiremerH.  Hot  head, 
cards,  posters,  mags,  tkxxj  morwy.  funl  21  3- 
664-2999  24hours. 

MED.  COLLECTORS 

Candidates  must    have   experience  working 
w/medi-cal,  medicare,  HMO,  private  irwur 
arKes.  Billing  skills  required.  Fax  resume  to 
310  390^8030    or   call    310-915^029.    Me 
daphis  Physician  Services  Corporation. 

MEDICAL  ASSISTANT 

for  out  patient  clinic.  Must  be  fluent  in  Eng- 
lisM'P'nese.  Resumes  only  please,  to:  1950 
Sawtelle  Blvd   Suite  US,  LA,  90025. 


MGNT  TRAINEE 

No  experience  necessary  Company  exparHt- 
ing  in  area.  Seeking  enthusiastic  people  to 
manage     branch     offices.  S400(ymonth 

■^benefits.  213-463-0633 


24    Wednesday,  May  24, 1995 


Daily  Bruin  Classified 


30  Help  Wanted 


30  Help  Wanted 


Quality 

Is  Everything. 

Great  customer  service.  Innovative  products  and  services.  And  an 
atmosphere  that  encourages  top  performance.  You'll  find  it  all  at  Avco 
Financial  Services  We  cuncntly  offer  challenging  opportunities  for: 

Associate  Programmers 

When  you  combine  innovative  products  and  services  with  a  great  work 
environment,  you  create  a  strong,  successful  company  -  and  also  build 
exceptional  careers  for  the  employees!  This  is  why  Avco  Financial  Services 
enjoys  solid,  consistent  growthrgenerating  opportunities  such  as  our 
current  openings  for  Associate  Programmers. 

After  you  complete  our  comprehensive,  entry-level  training  program,  you 
will  be  given  selected  tasks  and  projects  to  help  you  develop  a  wide  range 
of  skills.'  You'll  learn  how  to  modify  program  code  and  control  languages; 
prepare  lest  ca.scs  and  test  data;  and  resolve  certain  problems  by  reviewing 
code  and  other  d<Kumentation.  Requires  an  Associate's  or  Bachelor's 
degree,  suong  written/verbal  communication  skills,  experience  in  PC 
applications,  suctessful  performance  on  our  programming  aptitude  test. 
Training  in  programming  and  kcyboarding  preferred. 

As  a  member  of  iht  Avco  team,  you' llenjoy  a  corhpelTtive  salary,  generous 
benefits  and  an  excellent  work  environment.  So  apply  today!  Mail  or  fax 
your  resume,  with  salary  requifemfenLs,  to:  Avco  Financial  Services,  P.O. 
Box  19701,  3349  Michelson  Drive,  Irvine,  CA  92713-9701;  Fax:  (714) 
553-7722  Principals  only.  Equal  (Opportunity  Employer. 

Avco  ^^  Financial  Services 

Subsidiary  o(  Taxtron  Inc 


•••••••* 


30  Help  Wanted 


SWIM  INSTRUCTORS 

tarn  $10-14/hf.  Spring  vtd  summer.  Wot 
LA^alley.  Experience  a  plut.  Background 
working  with  children.  Flexible  Kourt.  Greg 
310-289.7254. 

TELEMARKETER.  In  Beverly  Hills,  looking  (or 
ftudeni  to  telemarfcet  from  9am- 1 1am.  Good 
pay.  For  appointment  call  Sara  310-859- 
9572,  betv>>een  9am.  1 1  am. 

TELEMARKETERS  NEEDED  IMMEDIATELY. 
Excellent  pay,  nexible  houn,  near  campus. 
Opening*  available  imnr>ediately.  Telemarfcet- 
ing  experience  preferred.  Call  310-552- 
6253.  

TELEPHONE  SALES 

INVESTMENT  FIRM  located  in  Sherman  Oak* 
seeking  broker's  assistant.  Part-time,  hourly 
waRC  +bonuses.  Call  818-783-4900. 

TRANSLATOR 

Student  fluent  in  Chinese  for  book  project. 
Need  good  translation  skills  (Chinese  to  Eng- 
lish). Good  pay.  Set  own  hours.  310-285- 
8616. 


MODELS 

needed  for  posters  and  catalog  assignments. 
All  types  5'2'-5'10".  Photo  test  required  for 
all  applicants.  Top  pjy.  310-276-7648. 

MODELS:  YOUNG  MEN  WANTED  (or  nude 
and  semi-nude  modeling.  Good  pay.  Imme- 
diate  work.  Gail  Derek  21  3-845-9669. 

MTV  EXTRAS 

18-25  years  (or  MTV  Malibu  Beach  House. 
Skate  half-pipe  celebrities,  pool,  and  morel 
5/19  9/2.  Call  818-505-75451 

Off  ICE  ACCOUNTANT/BOOKKEEPER.  $9- 
$12Aw,  PT/rr.  Prefer  junior  or  above,  MUST 
KNOW  Excel,  typing  skills.  3-blocks  from 
UCLA,  Call  Ron  310-470^61 75. 

Orria  assistant,  fa.  Type  45wpm,  ^n- 
eral  clerical  skills,  good  opportunity,  pie««il 
environment.  Need  responsible,  indeperxlcnl 
worker.  S8.00  to  start.  310-820-3651. 

OFFICE  Hap.  Clerical  work  (or  court  rcport- 
ir>g  ofTice.  Encino.  IrKluding  lig^t  typing 
computer,  and  filing.  PA.  Flexible  hours. 
$7.5(Vhr.  818  995-2449. 

PAINTERS  NEEDED 

Experience<VUnexpericr>ccd  FA  job  during 
surrvner  with  residential  paintir>g  compar>y. 
$6-e^our  starting  wagr.  Call  Paul.  310-504- 
4494. 

PAINTING 

Outdoor  Painting.  40  hrv\veek.  S6-(Vhr.  Ex- 
pericTKC  is  good  but  not  necesury.  Cold 
Calling  M  well.  Call  Vince  3iaS04-V951. 

PERSONAL  TRAINER.  Upscale  fitness  center. 
San  Fernando  We«  Valley.  Knowtedj^  of 
analonny.  Call  Tim:  818  705  6500  ext  256. 
POSTAL  AND  COVIRNMENT  JOBS. 
S2lAMXir  ♦  ber^eTits.  No  experiertce,  will 
train    To  apply  call  1  aoa536-3040. 


RETAIL/RECEIVING 

Beverly  Hills  Menswear  store  seeks  detail -ori- 
ented, computer-literate  individual  for  multi- 
far.eted  position.  Most  possess  excellent  com- 
munication ar>d  organizational  skills.  Full- 
time. 310-471-6436. 


SUMMER  JOBS 

Fine  High  Sierra  Family 
Resort  at  cool  7500' 
seeks  live- in  counselors 
(20up)  to  TEACH: 

•  Western  Equitation  (2) 

•  Canoeing  (1) 

•  Sailing  (1) 

•  Pre-School  oxp  to  work 

with  children  2-6  yrs  (4) 

•  Swimming  -»■  Lifeguard  (2) 

•  Adult  Crafts  &  Jewelry  (1 ) 

800-227-9966 

Call  (.>dilv  or  Sund<iys 
f.>at«;s     Jun  1.5  to  Sppt  7.  1995 


PRFCT  SUMMER  JOB 

MARKETING.  Are  you  earning  ¥^al  you're 
wortM  Arc  you  ready  to  (ocus  and  be  your 
best?  Call  3ia281  8111. 

PRIVATl  SWIM  INSTRUCTORS  at  client 
homes.  SUSlMw^bonuscs.  Flexible  sched- 
uling. Hiring  lor  summer.  WSI  plus  stror>g  ex- 

periervre.  Call  K>hn  310-271  3441. 

RAOKD  ANNOUNCfRS^ISK  KXKEYS.  No 
experience  necessary,  produccAHMt  shows 
(or  our  stations.  Sparc  lime.  Free  training 
^real  bcnefitt,  213-468^0064,  24  hrs. 


RECEPTIONIST 

FA,  needed  to  answer  phones.  File,  photoco- 
py, do  light  typing,  pcriorm  mailroom  duties 
tntl  run  occasior^al  errands  (or  a  rrwtion  pic- 
ture company  in  BH.  Hrs:9am-6pm. 
$400/wk  Paid  parking.  Send  resume  to  Per 
Sonne  I,  9536  Wilshire  Blvd.,  §410,  Beverly 
Hills,  CA  90212. 

RECEPTIONBT  WANTED  (or  BH  Office. 
Phones,  gerteral  office  duties.  PA  or  FA.  Ex- 
perience   in    Microsoft    Programs   pre(erred. 

Pleaae  call:  310-657  9252. 

RECEPTKXIST.  Entry  level  position  available 
immcditfely  fc>r  m  erwrgetic,  hardworking 
person.  Job  Includes  heavy  phones,  client  In- 
teraction tnti  light  office  duties.  Musi  have 
good  phone  ntarwters  artd  front  o^tce  ap- 
pearance. Call  310-274-8025  tor  an  ^»polnl- 


SALES  PERSON 

for  afternooTH.  Paris  Pastry.  No  experierKC 
necessary.  $5.5QA>our.  Apply  in  person:  1448 
WestwoQcT  Blvd.  or  call  Corinne  310-474- 
8888.     ^ 

SALES.  Sportscards/comic  book  store.  Salary 

open.  Full/part-time.  310-996-881 1. 

SCRIPT  WRITERS.  (3  needed).  Spend  summer 
helping  me  develop  3  scripts-  Elvis,  Malibu 
Comedy,  and  Maria.  818-503-2237.  (Work 
for  hire). 

SECRETARY/RESEARCH  ASSISTANT  (or  psy- 
chiatric research  program.  rH-  Requires  BA 
in  social  sciences.  MuH  have  expertise  in 
WordPerfect,  SKVhour.  Brenda,  3104124- 
4447. 


US  GOVT.  JOBS  hiring  now:  100"$  of  Entry 
level  openings  u^ated  daily.  Call  toll  free  1- 
800-549-2300,  Ext  #3872. 


NEW  FACES  NEEDED  NOW 

•  For  TV  Commercials 

•  Movies 

•  Catalogs 

•  Videos 

call  Immediately 

(310)659-4855 


US/INT'LCO. 

presently  operating  in  25  countries.  Exparwi- 
ing  rapidly.  Needs  help  immediately.  PA 
$500-2,000/mo;  FA  $2,00a6,00Q/mo.  310- 
274-3440. 

WAITERS 

WAITERS/WAITRESSES.  AJleast  2-years  ex- 
perierKe  in  Frerxrh  service,  banquet  facility. 
Must  own  tuxedo.  Call  Avi,  310-47a2821, 
10am-3pm.  10500  Wilshire  Blvd. 


WORK=FUN 

Management  International  marketing  firm 
exparwiing  in  L.A  area.  Looking  for  people 
wfx>  like  to  travel  arvi  enjoy  working  with 
people.  3-5K/mo.  potential.  Call  818-447- 
2580. 

WRITER 

SMALL  aNTURY  CITY  LAW  FIRM  seeks  FA 
excellent  writer  to  prepare  immigration  peti- 
tions. No  legal  experierKC  required.  Word- 
processing  experierKC.  Degree  Required. 
SI  lAv°  start.  CallAax  resume  and  writing 
sample  (4  pages  max.).  Phorte:310-S53- 
6600.  Fax:310-553-2616. 


31  Temporary  Agencies 


MAC/IBM  SKILLS 

Worth  SiMwur.  Don't  gp  to  a  temp-farm. 
Don't  join  the  herd.  Call  SUPERK)R  TEMPS. 
310-312-0131. 


REXAItCH  POSITK>4.  Technician  poaHion 
in  clinical  feaearch  setting  working  w/addic- 
tk}n  nmmii  program.  MWF  4  9pm.  %]Q/Ur. 
In  Wtfli  LA  Contact  Mr.  McCww)  alter  10am 
M^F,  S18- 592-6040  or  fax  resume:  818- 592- 
6043. 

RETAM.  SALES.  Children's  book  shop.  Must 
be  availabie  S4.  and  have  knowiedge  of 
chikiren's  books.  WIA  310-559-2665. 


SERVERS 

WAITERS/WAFFRESSES  for  Hollywood  Bowl 
Picnic  BaskeU  Restaurant,  nighu  June  3-end 
of  September.  Call  21 3  851  -3588  for  applica- 
lion. 

SERVERS  WANTED/BIKINI.  Earn  $100+/shift. 
Must  be  outgoing,  attracth*,  I84.  Call  818- 
765-5217. 

SUMMER  CAMP 

IN  MALIBU.  Salary  plus  room  and  board.  Po- 
sitions include:  sailing,  water  ski,  pool  super- 
visor, riflery,  song  leader  and  cabin  courv 
lelors.  Call  (or  application  and  more  informa- 
tion:  818^880  3700.  

SUMMER  EMPLOYMENT?  Responsible,  »- 
ticulale  individuals  PA  for  f)owntown  deliv- 
ery company.  Great  payl  Drivers  and  phone, 
personr>el  needed.  Flexible  hours  to  work  v- 
ound  your  busy  schedule.  213-749-9009. 


SUMMER  JOBS 

ActivisU  needed  to  «vork  on  vi  initiative 
campaign.  Hxvt  fun,  make  a  difference,  earn 
a  paycheckl  S25a$6O0/weck.  310-449- 
5390. 

SUMMER  JOBS 

WORTH  REMEMBERING.  Earn  (or  school 
while  being  a  camp  counsckx.  A  great 
summer  job  (or  Mudtnls.  Must  live  in  LA  or 
Ventura  CouNy.  Weekend  interviewing  now. 
Call  818-865-6263. 

SUMMER  JOBS! 

Hiring  now.  S-10  hill  and  pvt  time  jobs 
earning  flQ^.  Jobs  filled  flnrt-come,  first- 
serve  basis.  Call  310-374.4993. 


32  Career  Opportunities 


BOOKKEEPING 

Sical   records.    Excellcr^   opportunity    tor 
fierce,    supervised  by  CPA.    Computer 
vicdge,     reliable,  personable,  self-rrtoti- 
vated,  skilled,  intelligent.  Fax  resume:  213- 

342-0876. 

Century  City  kivestnrwnl  Banking  Firm  scek- 
ir^  broker  l/airwe  and/or  broker.  Great  op- 
portunity! FA-  Call  6tnnY  Artache  3ia843- 
9007. 

GRADUATING? 

ENVIRONMENTAL  MARKETING  COMPANY 
seeks  Irxiividuals  for  entry-tcvel/mana^r  po- 
sit iorH.  Attitude  more  important  than  experi- 
ence. S300&500(ymonth  potential.  818-447- 
7455. 


BARTENDER 
TRAINEES 

•no  exp>erience  necessary 
•earn$100-$2pO  daily 
•more  jobs  fhan  graduates 
•nation  wide  job  placement 

NATIONAL  BARTENDERS 
SCHOOL 

1-800-646-MiXX 

(6499) 
10  So.  Col.  Locations 


33  Jobs  Wanted 


TELEMARKETING 

PA  Appi  Setters 

For  Major  Cars  Org.  in  Pleasant  Bay 

His  Ofc  Must  Type  35  wpm+  Prior  TM 

exp  pref  $9/tir  *  comm 

(310)855-8603 


34  internships 


aNTURY  CITY  ENTERTAINMENT  PR  FttM 
seeks  intern  to  assist  on  press  liason  uyi  spe- 
cial events.  Must  know  WordPerfect,  be  up- 
beat, and  fun.  Fax  resume  or  letter  213-661- 
4999. 

INTERNS  NEEDED 

Fast  paced  entertainment  Martagentent^o- 
duction  CO.  seeks  nwtivated  interns.  Incred- 
ible industry  exposure,  no  pay.  Credits: 
•Hook/  Jade,"  'Universal  Soldier.'  Fax  re- 
sume: 310-996-1892,  Attn:  Carol. 


f 


MUPPETS! 


Do  you  love  the  MuppeUf  Well  then,  contact 
Halle  at  213-960-4096  about  a  script  reading 
and  research  internship. 

XEROX  CORP. 

RECRUITING  interns  NOW.  Need  customer- 
care  specialist,  market -research  interns, 
fuil/part-tirT>e  positions  available.  Stipend  of- 
fered. Send  resunrte  to:  Xerox  Corporation, 
Leslie  Ameel,  180  E.Ocean  Blvd.,Suite  224. 
Lonn  Beach,  CA  90802. 


35  Child  Care  Wanted 


BRENTWOOD 

Responsible,  caring  live-out  for  4-y/o  boy. 
Saturdays,  some  weekday  evenings.  Flexitile 
hours.  Need  car,  excellent  rcferericcs.  Lor>g- 
tcrm.  310^20-7847. 

''CHILDCARE  WANTED,  10  hours/week  for  a 
9-year  old  girl.  Must  drive.  Mostly  early, 
weekdays,  evening  hours.  Bel  Air  Area.  310- 
777-0074.    

MUSIC  LOVER 

P/T  care  for  1 1  year  old  music  loving  boy. 
Mid-June   through    mid-August.  Must    have 

own  car.  Bel-Air  area.  310-271-2950. 

Resporwible  person  to  help  out  with  two 
children,  afterrxxim/evenirtgs,  some  wee- 
kends. Possible  drhrln^  light-housekeeping. 
References  required.  Call  Nancy  310-475- 
8359. 

SUMMER  SITTER  (fun,  energetic  stud^ 
needed  for  1 3  year-old  boy.  Daytime  hours. 
West  Hollywood  area.  Cy  needed.  Female 
prefafred.  21 3-931  -0044,cxt261 . 


49  Apartments  for  Rent 


1-MINUTETOUCLA 

WESTWOOO-  $525-$800  studioTl-bdrm. 
furnishe<Vunfumished,  pool,  laundry,  no  pets, 
no  parking.  1 -year  lease.  310-824-3000. 

1-BDRM$S75 

Huge  apartmenU,  ideal  for  roommates.  Car- 
den  courtyard,  pool,  A/C,  phone-entry.  Near 
Sherman  Oaks  Calleria.  Minutes  to  campus. 
818-997-7312. 

1 -BEDROOM  $675 

Garden  courtyard.  Quiet  residential  yea.  Ap- 
pliances, blinds,  parking,  laundry,  and  morel 
Bike  or  Blue  bus  to  canr>pus.  310-477-0725. 

2-BDRM/$635 

SHERMAN  OAKS  ADJ.  Garden  api.  Huge 
kitchen.  Quiet.  6-unit.  Ne¥vly  painted,  car- 
peted. 1/2-block  busses.  Near  markeU,  free- 
ways:  818-399-9610.  

3-bd/2-ba,  $960/mo 

WLA.  Convenient  to  campus,  quiet,  newly 
painted,  laundry,  bright.  Available  imme- 
diately. 11521  Rochester  Ave.  Infbrma- 
tton/open  house,  call  310-476-231 7. 

424  LANDFAIR 

WESTWOOD,  NEXT  TO  UCLA.  2-3  bed- 
room apartmenU  available  (or  summerAall. 
Hardwood  fkxm.  balconies,  laundry  room. 
swlnrvnlnn  pod.  Call  310-459-1 200. 

AFFORDABLE  APT. 

PALA4S.  $475-single.  $575-1 -bedroom.  Re- 
fridgerator.  stove,  disposal,  A/C,  pool,  park- 
ing, laundry.  Open  house  Saturday/Survlay  1  - 
5pm.  10136  National  Blvd.  310-836-1413. 


AMAZING  DEAL 

WLA.  1629  Brockton.  Singles  $530.  New 
appllarx:es,  carpet,  vertical-blir>ds,  cable 
ready,  gated.  Good  studertf  discount  on  park- 
ing.  310-477-0112. 

BEVERLY  HILLS  AD) 

1&2-BEOROOMS  $72S-$89S.  SOME 
WAiARDWOOO  FLOORS.  ONLY  1/2 
BLOCK  TO  PCO  BUS.  ASK  ABOUT  BIG 
BONUSIII  310-839-6294.  ** 

BEVERLY  HILLS 

CHARMING  country  French  2-bdnii>  apart- 
ment. Hardwood  floors,  swimming  pool,  and 
much  nr>ore.  $  1 1 00.  3 1  a276- 1 67 1 . 


■ 


*  MAR  VISTA  *"' 

2B0,  ?flA  2  STORY 

CUSTOlMl  TOWNHOMES, 

GATED  OARAGE.  CENTRAL  AIR. 

FIREPLACE.  UNIT  ALARUM 

*  1 1 748  COURTLEIGH  DR  $045 

*  PALMS  * 

2  BO.  2BA  CUSTOM  TOWNHOIWIC, 

FIREPLACE,  BALCONY  GATED 

OARAGE,  ALARM  IN  UNIT 

*36UFARISDR  1005 

^   CAU  (310)  391-107$ 

%<^      ToaeeTHe 


LOVtLY  APARTMENTS 


ml 


49  Apartments  for  Rent 


LUXURY  LIVING  AT  STUDENT  PRICES 


RESERVE  YOUR  APARTMENT 


Ml 


*  UP  TO 

2  STUDENTS 

OHEBEOBOOt^ 

^^       UP  TO 

3  STUDENTS 


10  BEOB 


oow\ 


UP  TO 
5  STUDENTS 

ROOFTOP  SUNDECK  •  JACUZZI 

FITNESS  CENTER  •  SAUNA  •  BBQ 

GATED  PARKING  (EXTRA  SPACES  AVAIL  , 

CENTRAL  AIR/HEAT  •  EXTRA  LARGE  PATIOS 

INDIVIDUAL  APT  ALARM  SYSTEMS 

21HR   STUDY  ROOM  •  ON  SITE  LAUNDRY 


3  BLOCKS  TO  CAMPUS 
FREE  ROOMMATE  LOCATION  SERVICE 


824-96 


BRENTWOOD  ADI 

Bright  %pxk>ut  upper  bachelor.  All  utintiea 
paid  for  IrKluding  laurxiry  facilitiet.  $449. 
310-312-0265. 

BRENTWOOD  AOJ.  1-mile  to  campua.  Lvge 
single.  5625,  available  June  7th.  Large  1- 
bdrm.  S735.  available  June  21 «.  1235  Feder- 
al Ave.  310-477-7237. 

BRENTWOOD 

Gated  building.  $10S(ymonth.  Airy  3-bed- 
roonV2-bath.  Fireplace,  itov^idgc,  laundry, 
Berber  carpet.  miniWindt.  1/2-block  from 
Wilshire  bua.  Crad  student  preferred.  310- 
275-7139. 

BRENTWOOD.  $1175/month.  Luxury 
2bdrm,  2bath.  New  security  building.  Gated 
parking.  Prime  ana.  508  Barrington.  213- 
934-5000. 

CLOSE  TO  CAMPUS 

WESTWOOD.  Spacious  and  sunny  3-bdrm, 
2-bath  apartment  w/loU  oFckxet  spa£e.  414 

Landfair.  $1750.  310-276-1671. 

CULVER  CFTY.  $685.  2-bedroom  duplex,  se- 
cure, quiet,  laurtdry.  yard,  garage.  Buses,  off- 
street  parking.  Near  Sony  Studios.  Availbic 
July  1- 310-637-6779. 

EAST  OF  VILLAGE 

Large  2-bdmV2-ba.  1/2-block  to  campua. 
Gated-entry  artd  2-car  parking,  large  closet, 
dishwasher,  microwave.  No  pets.  $1295&up. 
310-206-2376. 

FREE  LAUNDRY 

CULVER  Crrv.  3>2.  Miniblinds,  track  light- 
ing. NEW  Berber  capet.  Stove,  D/W,  2-c» 
parking.  4-miles  UCLA.  $1200.  213-936^ 
2406. '^ 

LARGE  SINGLE 

Quiet  area,  Wilshire  disUid,  separate  kitch- 
enA>alhroom,  fumishedAinfurnished.  Trust- 
worthy student  preferred.  Call  Dante  at  City 
t^ews  (eve)  714-773-4902.  $395/month. 

MAKE  A  DEAL!! 

WLA^ALMS.  Single  apartment,  $550.  Clean, 
large  pool,  convenient  to  shopping  and 
UCLA,  3ia204-4332.        

MAR  VISTA,  $870.  2  bed/2-bath.  Newer,  2- 
story,  custom  townhome,  fireplace,  gated  ga- 
rage, unrt  alarm.  Open  7-days^-S.  12741 
Mitchell.  310-391-1076. 

MAR  VISTA,  $870.^-bedroom/2-bath.  New- 
er. 2-story  custom  lownhouse.  Gated  ftvagi, 
unit  alarm,  fireplace.  Open  7-days^S. 
12741  Mitchcn.3ia391-1076. 


NEAR  EVERYTHING 

WEST  LA.  $67S-fMcurlty  depoaM.  l-bdmVl- 
bath.  1410  S.Barrln^on.  310-671-6570  or 
310-410-1499. 

NEAR  SCHOOL 

BRENTWOOD,  11675  Dariington.  2-b«<- 
rooms/2-batha  from  SHOO  and  up.  310-410- 

PALMS  $575    • 

1  bdrrrVI -ba,  larp  upper  quiet  unIL 
Refrigerator,  slovi.  parking,  laundry.  3219 
B4ghiy.  310-206-9975,  day.  213-876-0371, 


Daily  Bruin  Classified 


49  Apartmefits  for  Rent 


Wednesday,  May  24, 1995     25 


49  Apartments  for  Rent 


Sammeff  Honsing  Help 


out  Our  FREE  Servicts 


Find  a%um 

Sum|iiir 
Subloji.! 
Just 


Come  see  us  in  Sproui  Haii  Annex 
826-4491 

UCLA  Community  Housing  Office 


PALMS  $595,  1 -bedroom  security  building, 
very  quiet,  all  appliances.  Convenient  to 
campus.  Security  deposit  $100.  A/C,  laundry. 
310-6377061. 

PALMS  $750.  2-bdmi/l-ba,  refrigerator,  dish- 
washer, stove,  central  air,  fireplace,  two  un- 
derground parkinij.  Quiet.  Bus  #12.  6-year 
new  security  bui Idinn.  310-556-1 688. 

PALMS  2-BR  CONDO 

Stove,  dishwasher,  A/C,  balcony,  security 
building  and  parking.  10-minutes  from  canr»- 
pus.  $75(VW>onth.  Don,  310-838-9962.  310- 
638-1600  x-641 4. 

PALMS  371 7CARDIFF 

HLICE,  2-BEO/2-BATH,  $675.  UPPER,  FIRE- 
PLACE. EXTRA  aOSET,  ALL  AMENITIES, 
GATED,  NEWER  BUILDING,  QUIET.  1  BED, 
$675.  13-MIN  TO  UaA,  NEAR  THE  10 
AND  405.  310-636-7146  OR  310-636- 
0131. 

PALMS,  Spacious  2-bdrnV2-ba  apt. 
cortvenient  freeway,  shops.  Laundry,  secured 
parking.  Sublet  available  for  July,  August. 
$60(VtoUl,  $40(Vperson.  Call  Kevin,  310- 
390-6602.     

PALMS-3675  VINTON.  2ND  FLOOR  2-lyge 
unfurnished  bedi/1-bath.  $77Vmo.  Call 
310-544-3262. 

PALMS.  $995,  2-bed/24>ath,  custom  town- 
home,  fireplace,  balcor>y,  gated  garage, 
alarm  in  unit  3614  Faris  Or.  310-391-1076, 
637-0906. 

PALMS.  $995,  2-bed/2-bath,  custom  town- 
home  Fireplace,  balcony,  gated  garage, 
alarm  in  unit  3614  Faris  Or.  310-391-1076, 
637-0906. 

PALMS.  $995.  2-bed^-bath,  custom  towrv 
home,  fireplace,  balcorry,  gated  gvagi, 
alarm  in  unit.  3614  Faris  Or.  3ia391-1076. 
637-0906. 

PALMS.  24-1  uppm.  bright,  quiet,  gated  pvk- 
Ing.  new  carpet  $675.  Available  now.  Call 
Marios.  310-629-0589. 

PALA4S.  Discounted  apartments.  Ibdrm- 
$550.  2bdmVlba-  $725,  bachelor  apart- 
menU $425.  Minutes  to  Century  City  and 
Westwood.  3264  Overland.  310-837-3013. 

PALMS/WLA. 

1 -bedroom,  2-bedroom,  3-bedroom,  from 
$550  up.  Bright,  quiet,  carpet/drapea. 
AovcAefrigerator,  parking.  Close  to  bus,  free- 
ways,  shopping.  No  peU.  310-479-8099. 

PALMS:  SINGLE&1BD 

Single,  $495.  Ibdrm,  $595.  1  month  free 
rent  Appliances,  no  pets.  Call  9am-7pm  310- 
637-4196.  Ask  for  manager. 

Professional  Bidg 

WESTWOOD  2  BfD/2  BATH,  BEAUTIFUL 
PARK  VIEW,  balcony,  large-bedrooms,  walk- 
in  closets,  full-amenities,  rooftop- pool^acuz- 
zl.  Ready  move-in.  $1350.  Call  ^>point- 
ment:  1360  Veteran  310-477-5106. 

SANTA  MONICA 

3-bcdroonV2-bath  w/garage.  15-minutas  to 
UCLA.  Half-block  soud«  of  Wilshire.  For  N/S 
trad  student  Available  7/1.  $160(Vmonth. 
310-626-6621.     

SHERMAN  OAKS 

$735.  Gated,  2-bed^2-bath,  central  air,  dish- 
washer, fireplace.  Also  single,  $450,  13406 
Moorparic  St.  618-907-9237  or  616-222- 
6296.      

SINGLES  &  BACHS 

WESTWOOD.  $475  $780.  Overlooks  West- 
wood  Park.  Clean,  quiet.  Pool,  patio,  gated- 
entry-system.  Available  immediate- 
ly-)une,  July,  August.  Terri  3ia477-63S2. 


TOWNHOUSE 

WLA.  2-BDRM/2.5-BATH,  newer,  well-main- 
tained, conveniently  located,  security  build- 
ing, subterranean  parkin t  laundry.  310-479- 
6856. 

UNIQUE 

WESTWOOD/CENTURY  CFTY.  Large,  spa- 
cious singles.  Starting  at  $60(Vlmonth.  Air, 
Pool,  5-minutes  UCLA.  Please  Call  Pamela 
310-474-5700. 

WALK  TO  UCLA 

Westwood.  Bachelor  apartment.  Hardwood 
floor.  Full  bath  and  shower,  refri^rator/coun- 
ter,  no  full  kitchen.  Utilities  included. 
$45S/nwnth.  3ia206-626S. 


SPEaflCULfiR 

Split-level  single  / 1 


•across  from  UCIA 

Utilities  paid  for  select  units 
Assigned  gated  parking  included 

535  Gayley     (310)  208-3818 


Monterey 
Plaza 

2  Bed  /  2  Bath 
SI  200 

Central  Air/Ccniral  Heat. 

Security  building. 

Will  Allow  4  in 

1  Apartment 

Now  reserving  for  Fall 

11701  Texas  Ave. 

(310)477-0858 


49  Apartments  for  Rent 


WEST  LA 

Single,  $595.  1 -person,  no  pcU.  Full  kitchen. 
Carpets,  blinds,  parking,  laundry,  2-miles 
UCLA.  By  appointment  11321 
MasaachusetU.  310-477-6750. 

WEST  LA.  10  minutes  to  UCLA,  big  &  bright. 
Low  move-in.  2-bdrnV2-bth,  Single  $695  & 
up.  WASHtR/DRYER,  W.8.  fireplace,  sec. 
alarm,  ROOFTOP  SPA.  11221  Richland. 
476-3990. 

WESTWOOD 

2-8edroom/1 -bath,  $1050.  Singly  $675. 
Great  location,  2  bkxks  UCLA.  1  car  park- 
ing. Available  July.  Days,  310-273-7S96. 
Evenings,  310-286-0980. 

WESTWOOD 

2bedroom/2balh.  $950  AND  UP.  TILE 
KITCHEN,  STEPDOWN  LIVING  ROOM.  UN- 
USUAL CHARM.  1-1/2  MILE  TO  UCLA  310- 
839-6  294.»* 

WESTWOOD 

3-MINUTE  WALK  TO  CAMPUS,  security 
building,  high-ceiling,  A/C,  fireplace,  inter- 
com, gated  garagr,  no  peU.  BachelorAin- 
gl«v'»ingle+lolt/2-bedroom.  $55a$1200. 

310-208-0732. 


WESTWOOD 

Summer  housing.  522  Landfair.  %bO0/rr>a. 
Double  occuparKy.  Includes  cable,  gas,  wa- 
ter, trash.  Call  Keith.  310-794-371 1  orKcrim, 
310-624-0757. 


Diamond  HeatT'^ 
Apartments 

Single  $675 

1  bedroom  $850 

2  bedroom  $1095 
2  bedroom  $1275 

Great  Building 

Negotiable  Rent 

Wonderful  Mmna^crs 

Reserve  units  for  Fall  now 

660  Veteran 

208-2251 


4t 


GENUINE  UCLA 
SPECIALS 

I  UHNISHt  IJ  HACtULOMS 

From  S  495 

FUHNISMtl>  SINtil  tS 

From  S  595 

FUMNISHEO   I    MIrDMOOIVC. 

From  S795 

SIHJHI     II  t<M   AVAU  AMI  F 

tJIHF  CTI  V  A<,HOSS  TIIOM 

Mil)  C:AM»'IJS  UCLA 


wFSTwnon  nt  a^a 

AI'AK  I  Ml  rjTS 
'.01    •.()',  CiAVI   I   V   AVI 
(  I  111)  ;^<)H  H'.n-, 


WESTWOOD  VILLAGE 

Enormou.s  apartments  with  dining 
room,  balcony,  fireplace,  bit-ins 
Pool,  gated  subterranean  parking, 
FREE  CABLE  TV. 

1  Bedroom/ 1  Bath from$  800 

2Bedroom/2Bath from  $1,300 

691  LEVERING  AVENUE 
(310)  208-3647 


WALK  TO  UCLA 


WESTWOOO.  Taklr>g  reMrvaliorw  for  sum- 
mer and  fall.  eachek}r,rtuiiio,  Ibdrm  with  fM- 
tio,  and  2bdrm.  Hardwood  fkxxi,  spaclout, 
bright  parking  and  laundry.  Call  310-279- 
1667. 

WALK  TO  UCLA! 

We*twood.  PrlvaleA|uiet  1 -bedroom.  Secure, 

Jatcd     parking,     pool,    mutm,     rec    room. 
103S/month.     Meal     for    pro(aaaional/^ad 
itudenL  3104124-2866. 

WEST  L.A. 

Large  unfumiihad  one-bdrm  $600.  Mini 
MifMk,  ceiling  fane,  ttov^efri aerator,  new 
paint.  UCLA  but  line.  3637  Sepulveda  Blvd 
Apt.  f  S.  rrwo  blocks  north  of  Venice  Blvd) 
310-39a5065. 


parking, 

SUMMER  MADNESS 

Wt  ST  WOOD.  $600  iummer,  1  Mm\/2balh. 
$1195  fail,  2bdrm/2bath.  Walk  to  UCLA  and 
village.  Quiet  small  building  with  security 
parking.  Call  between  9afn  and  7pm  lor  an 
appointment.  3ia208  4835.   519  Clenrock 


WEST  LA 

LARGE,  BRIGHT,  Ibdrm.  $795.  Security 
building,  gated  parking  all  appliances,  VC, 
balcony,  peU  ok.  310-724-6169,  310-478- 
7001  (after  Spm). 

WEST  LA 

LAKCC  2BO/2B\  $665.  Large  single  avail 
able,  $490.  Swimming  pool  and  gated  pok- 
ing.   1700  South    Bundy.   310-276-1671   or 
JTO-207-  387«. — r-^r--^ 


WESTWOOO.  1-bdrm,  $1100.  2.bdrm, 
$1500.  New,  hieh  quality  luxury  building.  2 
blocks,  south  of  Wilshire.  Balcony,  A/C,  Ja- 
cuzzi, marble  fireplace.  Call  Courtney,  310- 
473-9996. 

WESTWOOD.  2bdrm^2ba  luxurious  apar- 
Iment.  Half  mile  UCLA.  Pool,  hot  tub.  1 
block  from  bus  to  UCLA.  $1445.  Available 
ASAP.  310-575^)617.  

WESTWOOO.      DELUXE      1  -BEDRM.      ia 
MINUTE   WALK    TO    UaA.    VltAV    APAR 
TMENT,     qUIET     BUILDING.     AVAILABLt 
NOW.  $900.  11088  OPHW  DR.  CALL  3ia 
208-6661   3 10.20a.  26  <;■; 

WESTWOOD.  Female  roommate  needed  to 
•hare  room  in  2  bedroorTV2  bath. 
$362.5Q/month  ■»■  1/4.uillities.  Laundry,  bal 

cony^parking.  Call  3ia209  1615. 

WESTWOOD.  Single,  upper,  stove/refrigcra 
tor,    miniblinds,    hardwood    floors,    secure. 

SS6(ymonth.  310-476-0675.    

WESTWOOD.  Summer  rentals-  ditrounlr'd 
1  bik  walk  west  UCLA.  Single,  $6(K);  1  bdrm, 
$700;  large  Lbdrm,  $600  (3-4  persons).  310^ 

624-0762. 

WESTWOOD.   Takina  reservations  for  sum 
mtr  and  fall.   2-bedr2-bath,  all   appllanret, 
•wimming    pool/jacuui,     walk     to     UCLA. 
$1200-1400.  Call  310^624-0633. ;_ 

WESTWOOO.  Walk  to  UCLA.  Large  2 
bdrm/2-bath.  From  $1250  145(Vmonth.  Re- 
frigerator, stove,  A^,  fireplace,  gated  park- 

'^^ogggp  «g*>  «"» «««ck.  51  a  Vttoran.  310-  _ 
206-26S5. 


49  Apartments  for  Rent 


WESTWOOO/BEVHIUSA:ENTURY  city  ad- 
jacent. Prime  location.  2-bedroom  $990, 
near  UGLAAMtes/ofTtces/mall.  Large,  beauti- 
ful, carpeU,  appliances,  laundry,  bright,  din- 
ing, balcony,  private-garage,  quiel-building. 
310-474-1172. ^ 

WESTWOOO/PRIME.    Across    UaA.    Con- 
trolled enlry/parkinjt  Full  kitchen.    1-bdrms, 
$80a900,  2-bdfms,  $1200-1300.  Taking  res 
ervalions  for  summer  and  fall.  445  Landfair. 
310-624-1969. 

WLA 

$600.  Butler  and  Santa  Monica  Blvd.  1 -bed- 
room, kitcherVdining,  stove/refrigerator,  park- 
ing, laundry,  2-miles  from  UCLA,  blue  bus. 
Convenient  location.  310-452-3622. 

WLA  LARGE  2BDRM 

WLA.  $800  and  up.  Large  2bdrm  +1  3/4 
bath.  Seperate  dining  room.  No  pets.  818- 
703-6246.  

WLA  1-BDRM 

$62S/month.  Move-in  bonus,  first  month  free. 
Good  kxation,  parking,  laurtdry  room, 
stoveArkJge,  security  building.  1530  Gran- 
ville.   310-453-4009. 


52  Apoftments  to  Share 


$425  PALMS 

Own  roonVbath  in  2-beiV2-balh   j^>artmer«. 

All  amenities  ir^luded,  including  parkirtg. 
$42S/mo.  -t-  security  deposit.  Call  Ken  31  a 
615-9497. ■         _^ 

BEV  CTR/MELROSE 

Own  room  and  bath  in  furnished  2-bdrfT^. 
bath  charming  duplex.  Irxludes  gas,  electric, 
laundry,  cable.  Long^ihort-term.  $525.  213^ 
655-1756. 

BRENTWOOD.  Master  bedroom  and  bath 
available  in  large  3-bdrnV2-ba  w/only  one 
housemate.  UTQ/month  *\/2  utilities.  310- 
626-9117,  Sam. 

PALMS.  Must  see.  Own  bdrm/balh.  Modem 
glass/mirrors.  Black  chrome.  High  ceiling. 
Huge  picture  windows.  Pool,  bar.  Security. 

Extras.  S42SAnonth.  3ia204-3177. 

WILSHIRE.  Highrise,  19th  floor.  Spectacul*^ 
view.  Own  small  bdrnVbaih.  Pool,  Jacuzzi, 
•auna,  parking  available.  UbO/mornh.  Walk 
to  UCLA.  310-474-5093. 


53  Roomnnates 


WLA 

2-bdrnVl.S-bth,     $9S0+security,     gated     co 
rrwnunity,     mini-view,     upper     unit,     built- 
ins/custom  closet,  pool/jacuzzi,  tennis  court, 
remote    garage.     213-872-1952,     310-202 
1675.  Ask  for  Percy. 

WLA 

Special  move- in  rales,  2-bedroom,  A/C,  fire- 
place, gated-parking  and  entry  in  quiet-build- 
ing 15-min  from  UCLA  or  SMC.  3414  Jas 
mine.  Call  for  details  310  836-1360. 


WLA-$620 


BELOIT  AND  OHK3.  1-BDRMS  available, 
$620.  Verticals  and  covered  parking,  laun- 
dry, no  pels,  310  477-3316.  Singles,  $580, 
310  477  5472. _^ 

WLArl-bcd  $800  850,  Single  $635.  Security 
buil<^ing,  parking,  air,  pool,  laundry,  1/2-mile 
to  UCLA,  close  to  bus.  USOMidvale.  310- 
391  2874.  

WLA-MELROSE  PLACE? 

WLA  Huge  2  bdrnV2  balh,  $950;  larg,e 
bachelor  $499.  Swimming  pool,  suryleck, 
laundry,  barbecue,  appliances.  Melrose  Place 
iook-alikel  1621  Westgale.  310^20  1121. 

WLA.  $81S/month.  2  bedroorVl-bath  up- 
per, nice  view,  north  of  Santa  Monica.  Close 
to  UCLA,  shopping.  Bright,  nice  neighbor 
hood,  greenery.  Stove,  refrigerator,  balcony, 
new  decor.  Laundry,  parking.  1444  Barry  #5. 
310-264  0676. 


WLA.    $4SQ/mo,  bachelor  near  S^pla  Moni- 
ca/Bundy.  Carpets,  drapes,  refrigerator,  laun- 
dry,  no  pets.   Available  l)une   1st.   310-622 
6487. 

WLA-  BACHELOR  $475.  Close  to  campus, 
pool,  laundry,  refrigerator,  clean.  1330  S. 
Barrington.  Days:  310-451-0693,  evening: 
310  473  4989. 

WSTWD  SINGLE 

One-minute  to  LICLA.  SINGLE,  $625.  Fur- 
nished, unfurnished,  laundry,  pool.  Parking 
$60/mo.  310-208  2820. 

WSTWD  VILLAGE 

MIDVALE  N.  Of  LEVERING.  EXTRA  LARGE 
U2-BDRMS,  BALCONY,  DINING  ROOM,  3 
CAR  PARKING,  CHARMING.  GARDEN 
APTS.    310-839-6294. 


50  Apoftments,  Furnishied 


MAR  VISTA,  $S0a$600/month.  Ask  about 
free  rent.  Anradive,  single/1 -bdrm.  Lvfc, 
pool,  patio,  barbecue  area.  Quiet  buikiing. 
3748  InglewDod  Blvd.  31  a 398^1579 

WESTWOOO  VILLAGE.  $52S/month.  Fur- 
nished bachelor,  all  utilities  paid.  No  park- 
ing. RefrigeratorA>ol  plate.  2-blocks  to  cam 
pus.  10990  Strathmore  Dr.  310-471  7073. 

WESTWOOD.  Large  single,  $725,  walk  to 
school  and  village.  Available  June  21st.  667 
669  Levering  Ave.  3ia20e  3215. 


WLA.$57S/mo.  Ask  abou(  free 
Attractive  singles.  Near  UCLA/VA.  Ideal  (or 
students.  Suitable  for  two.  Quiet  building. 
1525  SawtelleBI.  310  477  4832. 


51  Apartments,  Unfurn. 


CULVER  CITY.$875 

large,  quiet,  modern  2bdrm/2ba.  Patio,  dish- 
washer, refrigerator,  gated  parking.  310-637- 
0761. 

MOVE-IN  SPECIAL 

CHEVK3T  HUES  ADJACENT.  $695.  Close  to 
campus.  Large  2  bdrnV2  ba  In  security  build- 
ing. Fully  loaded,  all  amenities.  310-636- 
6007  or  310-376-6^4. 

WEST  HOLLYWOOD 

Huge,  bright  2  bdrm/2-ba.  dining  fireplace, 
laundry,  carport,  iour^ain  Crescent  Heights. 
1-year  lease.  Available  now.  $100(VrTH>.  3ia 
438  9635,  310-433  9805. -      - 

Wl  A  $695.  2-bdrm/1 .5  ba,  dishwasher,  A/C, 
beautiful  carpet,  drapes,  built-ins,  balcony, 
high  vaulted  ceilings.  310  67a5119,  3ia 
391  7779, 

WIA  $895.    2  BED/SUNNY  UPPER     CLOSE 
Js  UCLA.    Gat«d«  louth  facing  balcony, onr 
carpet/paint.   Brockton,  310-3904610. 


VENICEAiDR.  House,  nice  neighborhood,  1 
block  from  beach.  2  rooms  open,   3  decics, 
hot  tub,  huge.  W/D,  garagfc.  $62SAno.  3ia 
623-2785. 

WESTWOOO.  Female  to  shve  2bed- 
roonV2bath.  $31QAth>.  Available  Jur«e  to  mid- 
September.  Cloae  to  campus.  C^iiet.  s«curMy 
building.  COME  SEE1I  618-264-2703.  (evcn- 

i"p) 

WESTWOOD.  Share  spacious  Ibdrm  apt. 
walk  to  campus,  law  student  preferred,  dis- 
count for  tkrtoring.  Short -term  ok.  Call  Mike, 
310  209  0966. 


WIA.  Share  2-bedroom  apartment,  private 
bath.  $42S*utllities.  Non-smoking  females 
only,  must  be  clean.  Quiet  area.  Near  UCLA. 
Available  Immediately.  Galed-security.  310- 
5S9S274. 


54  Room  for  Rent 


$325/Mo.  MAR  VISTA 

Furnished  room/share  bath  in  home.  Separate 
erHrartce.  KilcherVlaundry  facilities.  Pet  lover, 
N/S,  responsible.  Near  buslines.  Small-in- 
come possibility.  310-391-1113. 

$445  WESTWOOD 

Walk  to  UQA.  Huge,  sunny  room,  tieauliful 
ly  furnished,  laundry,  large  closet.  Yard.  Park 
ing,  kitchen,  MALE.  Available  now.  3ia475 
4517. 


BEVERLY  HILLS 

Own  room  in  2-bedroom  apartment.  Female 
Exceller>t  area.  Near  transportation. 
$45Q/mbnlh.  Parking.  310^56-6086. 

BEVERLYWOOO  ADJ.  Seeking  grad  slu<leni. 
Share  pretty  house.  Private  entrance,  fur 
nished,  facing  garden,  use  of  home,  hottub. 
On-strcet  parking.  Cato.  $60O4^utililifla.310- 
839^874. 

BRENTWOOD.  Spacious  master  bedroom 
with  private  bath  In  a  large  3bdr>T>/7bjlh 
apartrr^enl.  Brand  new  carpeU.  $S00,  parking 
available.  310-620  6292.  ASAP. 

CHINESE  DISTRICT 

ALHAMBRA-YOU  ARE  CHINISIAOU  %yanl 
a      Chirwae      home,  1  masterbedroom, 

$oS(y$325  to  share.      1  shared   stngte  "tef~ 
$250.  Call:81 8  576^2786.    Available  July  1. 


424  KELTON.  N/S,  Clean  male.  Share  bed- 
room, large  2+2  apt.  Quiet,  security  building 
w,^BOol,  Jacuzzi.  $400+  1/4  utilities.  310-824- 
2293. 

BEVERLY  HILLS  (  ^ 

Own  room  in  2-bedroooVl-bath  beautiful 
apartment.  Lovely  tree- lined  street,  high  r^eil- 
ings,  lots  of  windows.  $50C/monlh.  N/S.  310- 
825  6865,  310-772-0432. 

BEVERLY  HILLS,  Free  rent  in  exchange  for 
minor  housekeeping  artd  chores.  Female  pre- 
ferred.  310-289-1404  icavjg  message    ' 

BRENTWOOD.  N/S,  maic/female  profession- 
al/grad  student  to  share  large  apartment.  Se- 
cured building.  W/D,  fireplace,  deck,  park- 
ing.  $450  -futilities.  No  pets.  3ia820-5534. 

BRENTWfX)!)  Two  roommates  looking  for 
third  to  share  large  3  bedroonV3  balh  apart- 
ment. LaurwJry.  No  security  deposit. 
$517/n>o.  31  g  207- 1747. 

HILCARD  AVE.  Summer  and  Fall,  female 
students.  Large  house,  rooms  to  share,  T.V., 
kitchen  laundry,  housekeeper.  Mrs..  Solat 
310  208  8931. 

MARINA  DEL  REY,  roommate  wanted  to 
share  2bd  townhouse.  Prefer  grad  Uudcnl  or 
older.  Male  or  female.  $725/mo  Available 
now  Call  Brian  310-822  1312. 

NEED  RMMATE  NOW 

LISTEN  TO  ROOMMATE  ADS  ONI  INI. 
Roomale    Services    900-844-7666.     1.89/89 

for  quick  and  easy  lislinf>s  in  ytxjr  area. 

ROBERTSON/PICO  AREA  Own  room  in  2 
bedroorrVl-balh.  $38(Vmonih  plus  utilities. 
Water  included.  Near  stores  and  bus.  5-7 
miles  to  UCLA.  3iaS'i9  5962    

SANTA  MONICA  North  of  Wilshire,  near 
beach.  Female  roommatf  wanted.  3  bdrm, 
completely  remodeled  wAkylighl,  Own  balh- 
room,  phone  line.  $550.  310-451-4041. 

SEARCH  W/ME! 

N^  Female  wanted  to  join  me  in  apartmern- 
icarch.   Need  place  starting  mid  Jur>e.   WLA 

area.     2-bedroonV2-bath.    Kven,     3ia209> 

1540. 


26    VMnesday,  May  24, 1995 


Daily  Bruin  ClatsHled 


TICKLE 

OUR 

TASTEBUDS 

AND  THE 

DAILY 

BRUIN 

WILL 

TICKLE 

YOURS. 

Something's 

Cooking  at  the  Bruin! 

Subnnit  a  personal 

favorite  recipe 

and  if  it's 

chosen  we'll  feature 

your  name  and 

recipe  in  the  paper's 

classified  section. 

Also  get  $10.00 

FREE  on  your 

Bmin  Gold  Card. 


APPETITE! 

-drop  recipe 

submissions  at  the 

Daily  Bruin  front 

desk- 
225  Kerckhoff  Hall 


54  Room  for  Rent 


LA.  Near  Robertson.  Room  ktr  rent  in  44idrm 
houje.  1-roonV$375  -»-l/4  ulililie*,  include  all 
bou»e  privilege*.  Home:  310-83^-8774, 
work:  213-265-3503. 


NEXT  TO  MURPHY 

WtSTWOOD.  RooTTM  in  house.  Quiet,  non- 
smoking female  preferred.  PrivJie-bath,  kitch- 
en, Wash/Dry,  yard,  parking.  $475  &  $500. 
310-279  1436. 

SM  .$390/mo./OBO 

4bd/3ba  house  wA^UGE  living  room,  den.  8- 
minutes/lo  UCIA.  Near  buses.  Non-jMoklng 
male  preferred.  Call  hran  O  31 0-207-321  2. 

WEST  HOliyV/OOn  Furnished  room  for 
rent.  Female  preferred.  $35(Vmonth,  utilities 
included.  213-876-1626. 

WESTWOOD,  LARCf  ROOM,  private  bath, 
private  entrance,  furnished,  kitchenette,  clos- 
eL  Close  to  UCLA.  $500/nr>onth,  310-826- 
8588  am,  or  470-361 6  pm. , 

WESTWOOD.  Furnished  room  with  own 
bath  and  cable.  N/S.  Kitchen  privileges. 
$40(Vmonlh.  Barbara  Day  310  826-3il3. 
Ni);ht  310-470-9412. 

WLA:  $350/MONTH 

Male  graduate  student.  Furnished  bedroom  in 
private  house.  Quiet  for  studying.  Mi- 
crowave, refrigerator,  near  bus.  Weekly 
ckanwft.  JUk270=4jaz. 


54  Room  for  Rent 


MAR  VBTA.  $3S(]^no.,  own  phone  line,  3 
miles  from  beach,  ^/2  utilHict,  own  paifcir^g, 
310-391-1560. 


65  Sublet 


1  SPACIOUS  BEDROOM  for  1/2  fenftales. 
Furnished  2bt<i/26»lh.  6/18-a3l.  Walk  to 
campus.  Central  air,  poo\/%pa,  laundry,  2 
parking  spaces.  $325/person.  Call  Kimberly 

310-824-2177. 

SUMMER  SUBLET.  AcroM  from  campus.  1-2 
people  in  security  building.  ASAP.  5338,  June 
free.  Dave  or  Ben  310-209-0179,  818-363- 
1889. 

PALMS.  Own  furnished  badfoom.  own  bath 
in  2-bedfoom  apartment  Mid-JurH!  -  Mid- 
September.  Pvkir^  SSOtVmonth.  310-839- 
5069. 

RANCHO  PARK.  Furnished  bdrmAith  in 
large,  surmy  2-bdrm  apt  Free  parfcing^cjble. 
2-miles  from  campus,  on  buslirw.  Avail.  June 
10-Sept  10,  $485^H>.  Chris.,  310-475-8967. 

SANTA  MONCA,  Sth  Street  2-bedroom 
house  wAiackyard.  Clote  to  beach.  Parking. 
iaOOfmonth.  mid-June  thru  end-Aupist  Call 
310-399-8897. 

SANTA  MONICA.  Cran(/6th.  Nice  area.  Fur- 
nished ttudia  5-biocks  to  beach.  Mid-June 
thru  mid- September.  $45Q^irK)nth.  Call  310- 
4502856. 

SPACOUS  2BDRM  Midvalc  sublet.  June- 
Sept.  Furnished,  backyard,  laurviry.  Need  2-3 

females,  $300-350.  310-209-0922 

SUBLET  WANTED:  Magazine  seeks  sublet  for 
male  summer  intern.  C^*m  room,  prefer  own 
bath,  furnished.  Call  Virginia  or  Nick,  310- 
391-2245. 

SUMMER  SUBLET  WESTWOOD  Bachelor 
Apartnrtent.  $500  Including  utilities.  Fur- 
nished. jur>e  Itt  to  August  30th  (or  take  attv 
the  lease).  310-839-4129. 

SUMMER  SUBLET 

WLA.  1  -bedroom  apartment  available  rww 
through  September.  10-minutes  from  canrv 
pus,  beach.  On  busline  #1.  $40(ymonth  in- 
cludes utilities.  310-820-0649. 

1 -BEDROOM  SUBLET,  totally  furnished. 
1651  Veteran.  Imile  to  UCLA.  Hardwood 
Floors,  parkin]^  spacious.  Available  6/15- 
9/13.  S75(ymonth.  Call  Dan;  310-825-9505. 

1- BEDROOM/1 -BATH.  Large,  perfect  (or 
student/professor.  B'ight,  Modem,  Jacuzzi, 
Survieck,  Security  parking.  Westwood. 
30blocks  south  of  Wilshire.  Partially  fur- 
nished. Available  6/22-8/5.  Only  $1500  to- 
tal/obo.  Utilities  included.  3ia479-2290. 

2-BEDROOM/2-BATH.  Spacious,  hardwood 
floor,  brightly  lit,  parking  available. 
$140(Vmonth.  |uly  1  st -September  1st.  310- 
824-1212. 

S  MINUTES  FROM  CAMPUS.  1-2  roommates 
needed.  2-bed,  2-bath.  Huge  balcony,  water, 
parking.  $400-500.  CaJI  3ia208-5902. 

679  CAYLEV.  Need  2  people  for  1  of  2  bed- 
room furnished  apartment.  Parking,  water, 
cable  irxiluded.  Great  locationi  Mid-June- 
AuKust.  $375ea/month.  310-208-5005. 

AMAZING  WESTWOOD.  Wanted:  Up  lo  4 
sublclters  for  clean  and  bright  2-be(V1-bath 
Laryifair  Apt.  Hardwood  doors,  patio,  park- 
ing. $345/persorVmonlh.  Available  July  1st. 
Call  Kevin  310-794-3461. 

ATRIUM  COUKTI  Luxurious,  clean,  bright, 
2-bdrnV2-bath  apartmer>t.  Security  building 
parking,  gyrr^AreigN  room,  rooftop  Jacuzzi, 
balconies,  A/C.  $42S/mo:flexible  rates.  Linda 
310-794-3256. 

AVAILABLE  NOW! 

WLA.  Largie  room,  huge  living  room,  fur- 
nished/unfurnished. Clean  and  quiet.  Parking, 
laundry.  $375/month.  310-4790765. 

BRAND  NEW  APARTMENT.  L*ge 
3bdrm/3ba.  3  underground  parkir>g  spots,  2 
balconies,  VC,  dishwasher.  Bright  and  clean. 
Available  mid-|une-  Aug.  545  Glenrock.  20S- 
0389. 

BRENTWOOD,  1-bdrm  in  2  bdrnV1-ba,  fully 
furnished,  bright  apt.  Share/iingle.  Available 
6/20-9/30.  Pool/laundry,  sundeck,  living 
room  w/guest  couch.  Shared  kitchen. 
$530/mo.  incl.  util.  310-4711  320. 

aEAN,  NEW  WESTWOOD  SUBLET.  Comer 
GayleyMelton.  1  large  2  person  bedroom.  1 
parking  space.  Secured  building.  Available 
yi  8-8/3 1.  $36(yperson/mo.  310  209  1601. 
FEMALE  WANTED.  West  LA.  Sunvner  Sub- 
let 1  -bedroom  in  2-bedroom  apartment  Spa- 
cious, bright,  balcony,  high-beamed  ceilings, 
parking.  End-June  to  Oct.  1U.  $46^obo.  Call 

310  996-1373. 

FML  NEEDED  to  share  LRC  bdrm  from  mid 
lunc-mid  Sept  5  mis  from  UCLA,  pool,  ^/C, 
balcony.  $225/mth.  Piz  call  310-262-6851. 

HEYI  SPACKDUS  2-BED/2-BATH.  A  COZY 
singles  pad  1 -block  south  of  Santa  Monica 
Blvd.  On  bus  line.  Nice  arnisafe  area.  Low 
deposit,  S6S(Vmo.  Call:31 0-575  8944. 
Lg.  1  -brdnVI  -ba,  wet  bar,  parking.  1  -BIk  from 
campus.  Wendy/)essic.a  209-0262.  Best  offer. 

LUXURY  APT. 

WESTWOOD.  New,  security  building.  Spa- 
cious apartment.  2-bdrm,  2-balh.  2  parking 
spots.  Alarm,  microwave.  2  balconies,  frerKn 
doors.  Comer  Cayley^elton.  Price  negoli- 
able.  310-209-1195. 

MARINA  DEL  REY.  2-bdrrTV2-ba  townhome 
forsunwner  lease.  $1950/mo.  Fully  furriished, 
2-car  parking,  pool,  spa,  tennis  courts.  Call 

Susie,  310-574  0577. 

NEAR  SANTA  MONICA  AND  BUNDY.  Own 
room  in  2-bdfrTV2-balh.  Close  to  bus  line. 
$3S(Vn>onth.  Share  with  quiet  graduate 
student.  3ia820-5342. 

OLYMPIC  &  ROBERTSON.  6/23-9/6.  2- 
bdrrrVl-bth,  2-car  garage.  $475/mo.  Kim, 
310  657  2ms. 


55  Sublet 


SUMMER  SUBLET.  Up  lo  2  (emalo.  Julv- 
Aug.  Spaciom  2-be(V2-bath,  balcorty,  park- 
ir^  pool,  and  spa.  5-min.  lo  campuk 
S32SAno/penor^Dbo.  310-206-4649. 

SUMMER  SUBLET.  Very  spacious  2-badroom 
duplex,  fully  fumished,  hartKvood  floor,  se- 
curity area.  Silver  Lake.  (Sunacl  BlvcVSilver 
Lake  BKd/^0^  freeway).  Cloac  to  shoppir^ 
centers.  Also  ideal  for  HollyvM>od  &  Down- 
town intemshipk.  $489-1  person,  $548  toUl- 
2  peopleAnonth  ■>•  utilities.  21 3-663-891 2. 

SUMMER  SUBLETS 

5-minutes  to  campus.  July-September.  1  lo  3- 
bedroom  apartments  itartir^g  at  $90Q^nonth. 
Laurniry  u\d  parkir^  available.  310-471- 
4787. 

WESTWOOD 

Female  roommate  wanted  ASAP.  2-bdrrT/1- 
bath.  Share  master  bedroom.  No  deposit 
$30G^nonth.  May- August  free  cable  and  1/4 
utilities.  Karen  310-209-8240. 

WESTWOOD  SUBLET.  1-2  PERSON  $600 
overall  to  share  nuster  bedroorM>ath  in  2- 
bedroom  luxury  apartment  Mid  Jurw-mid 
September.  Walk  lo  UCLA.  Balcony,  gym, 
Jacuzzi.  Contact  Andrea  or  Nicole  3 10- 209- 
0976. 

WESTWOOD  SUBLET.  1  -bedroom  available 
in  2-bedroom  apartment  Fully  furnished, 
parking,  spacious.  S-mirtutcs  to  campus. 
Ophir/ClenRock.  June  19-mid  Sept, 
$42S/month.  Josh  824-1 453. 

WESTWOOD  SUMMER  SUBLET.  Female  to 
share  a  spacious  one  bedroom  apartment. 
Parking.  Price  r^egotiable.  Call  Monique  at 
310-209-3309. 

WESTWOOD  SUMMER  SUBLET.  Male  need- 
ed for  great  k>cation  at  403  LarwJfair. 
$35(yobo.  Contact  Doun:  310-824-7076. 
WESTWOOD  SUMMER  SUBLET:  2-bed- 
roonV2-bath,  A/C,  2  secure  parkir^  >|Mces, 
Jacuzzi,  cleani  1 -minute  to  campus.  Avail- 
able mid-June  to  erwl-August  $137Vmonth. 
310-208-1627. 


WESTWOOD -Landfair.  1  or  2  females  to 
share  1  -bedroom  in  spacious  2-bedroom/1 .5- 
bath  townhouse.  Available  6/19-e^1.  Hard- 
wood floors,  parking.  $675/month.  310-824- 
5564. 

WESTWOOD-679  CAYLEY,  NEW  SECURITY 
buikJing.  Close  to  campus.  Need  1-female 
to  share  room  ^9-8/30.  $425.  Call  Ele- 
na:3 10-824- 2011. 

WESTWCX)D.  1-2  people  to  share  spatious, 
modem  2-t>edroonV2-bath  apartment.  Laurv 
dry,  parking,  pool/spa.  ^7-8/31. 
$325/month,  June  free.  Deposit  $375.  Dia- 
nne,  310-824-7585. 

WESTWOOD.  1  -bedroom,  on  Kellon,  close 
walk  to  UCLA,  sublet  July-August  2  parking 
spaces,  $80(Vmo.  Call  310-794-4544  or  310- 
794-4  5S5,  leave  messanes. 

WESTWOOD.  2  females  needed  lo  share  one 
master  bedroom  in  a  2-bedfoonV2-bath 
apartment  Fully  furnished  irx:luding  kitchen- 
ware.  Security  building  w/pool.  5-minute 
walk  to  campus.  $30(Vrr>ontWperson.  Call 
310-209-1386  or  310-824-3565. 

WESTWOOD.  3  female  roommates  needed. 
2bdrm/2bath.  Spacious  living  room,  refrigera- 
tor, stove,  microwave,  dishwasher,  security, 
balcor^,  gated  parkir>g.  Clenrock/Ophir.  Late 
)une  Aug  31st.  Joy  310-824-9688. 

WESTWOOD.  3  spaces  available  in  2bdrm, 
2balh  apartment.  1/2-mile  to  campus. 
$32S/month  -^1/4  utilities  each.  Available 
June  1 7-AuKust  31.  310-209-0623. 

WESTWOOD.  FEMALE  RCXJMMATE  NEED- 
ED ASAP  fcir  July  ind  August  in  Tiverton 
Court.  $275/month.  Share  room  in  2-bed- 
room  apartment.  310-824-1911. 

WESTWOOD.  Female  roommate  needed. 
Summer  and  school  year.  1  -bdrm.  2-roorrv 
mates.  Close  to  UCLA.  Rent  $300  negotiable. 
Call  Laryssa  208-5025. 

WESTWOOD.  Female  wanted  to  share  2- 
bedroom/2-balh  wAwo  other  roommates. 
$31(Vmonth  -f  utilities.  Available  for  sublet 
June  to  September.  Call  71 4-962-0096. 

WESTWOOD.  Gorgeous  2-bdrm  apartment 
rtear  campus  r>eeds  up  to  3  females  to  share 
for  sumnwr.    Parking  available.    Call    206- 

8690. 

WESTWOOD.  Large  3-bdrm/2-ba,  Ihring 
room.  Dining  room,  kitchen  w/dishwasher,  3- 
space  parking,  laurxlry  services,  unfur- 
nishedAurnished.  443-1/2  Midvale. 

$200(ymo.  Contact  Colin,  310-794-4602. 

WESTWOOD.  large  single  to  sublet  July 
&  August.  1 -block  from  campus.  Furnished, 
no  utilities.    Pool,   laundry.  $47S/mo.   Call: 

310-824-4987. ^ 

WESTWOOD.  Need  2  people  for  1-bdrm  in 
2-bdrm  apt.  Parking,  Spacious.  423  Kelton. 
$35(Vmonth.  Call  Darrell:  310  824-9952. 
WESTWOOD.  Sublet  1  -bdrm,  gated  parking 
space,  furnished,  pool,  laundry,  VC.  Water, 
gas,  electricity.  Avail.  July  1  -Sept.  1 5. 
$810/mo  ($405  ea.  for  2).  3ia443^948. 

WLA.  Large  furnished  2-bedroonV2-bath. 
Parking,  2-blocks  from  bus.  SBAO/morlih  obo 
U  utilities).  Available  6/15-9/15.  Call  310- 
826-9654  or  310-442-5211. 

WLA/BRENTWOOD.  Master  bedroom,  own 
bath  in  3bdrm  apartment.  June-Aug^pt. 
Walking  distance  to  bus.  Pavilions.  $500  -f 
utilities.  310-477-6431. 


57  House  to  Stiore 


3-BDRM  TO  SPLIT 

WESTWOOD  HOUSE.  Own  roomA>ath  and 
use  of  guestroonVofftce  w/computer.  Furni- 
ture available,  laurviry,  fireplace,  dishwasher, 
security,  yard.  $65(ynr>onth.  Jody,  310-471- 

aoii. 


57  House  to  Shore 


WLA  GREAT  FIND 

Newer  2  story  4bdnTV3bath  house,  new  car- 
pets^alnl^ards,  fireplace,  A/C.  Large-kitch- 
en. Quite  setting.  Cable,  4  miles  lo 
UCLA/beach.  310^204132. 


58  House  for  Sole 


5-BEDROOM,  $475K! 

Santa  Monica  Adjacent  Huge  5-bedroonrV3- 
bath,  two  master  suitesi  Family  room,  hard- 
wood floors,  marble  bath,  great  neighbor- 
hood! 310-312-1476. 

DREAM  HOUSE 

CULVER  CITY.  3+1.  $214,000.  Beautifully 
upgraded  arwJ  remodeled.  Hardwood  floors, 
double  garage.  Prudetrtial  California  Realty. 
Anent  310-627-5512. 

FACULTY/STAFF-  Lhre  in  beautiful  M»ihat- 
tan  Beach,  tree  section'  charmer.  Safe,  nk» 
neighborhood,  top  schools,  3-bdrrTV2-bath 
•Ki^.  Wood  floor,  skylight  new  roof,  2-car 
garage.  Private  patio,  gazebo,  beautiful  gar- 
dens. Must  see  to  appreciate.  $435,000. 
Ag^,  310-545-1948.     


GREAT  DEAL!! 

SANTA  MONICA/SUNSET-PARK.  2-bdrm 
■Kier>/2-ba  or  3-bdrm/2-ba.  Separate  dining- 
room.  Remodeled  kitchen.  2-car  garage. 
$305,000.  2522  30th  SUeet  310-393-1795, 
714-597-0938. 


62  Room/Board  for  Help 


BRENTWOOD.  Male  student  only.  Guest- 
house in  exchange  for  10  hoursAveek  tutor- 
ing high  school  Chemistry  arxi  Spanish,  plus 

errands.  310-472-2628. 

FRYMAN  CANYON.  Room/Board  -t^  $5GMc 
in  exchange  for  20  hr^M^  babystting,  late  af- 
temoor^early  evening.  Must  have  own  car. 
Jennifer,  310-273-O467. 


HOLLYWOOD  HILLS 

Private  roonrVbath/enlrarxie  w/nice  family  in 
home  EXCHANGE  for  afterschool  help  and 
childcare.  Year-round.  MUST  HAVE  depend 

able  car/insurance.  21  3-650-3100. 

HOUSEMOTHER 

Westwood.  Live-in.  Lovely  senior  retirerrwnt 
rcsiderx:e.  24-hour  light  duties  in  exchange 
for  room,  board,  small  salary.  310-826-3545. 

TEACH  CHINESE? 

Housekeeping/chitdcare  for  7-year-oU  boy  in 
Beveriy  Hills.  Private  roon^ath.  Approx- 
imately 204^hr^wk.  Salary  rwgotiable.  Fe- 
male, own  car.  310-273-8568. 


63  Sailboats  for  Rent 


ESCAPE-TO- THE-SEA.  Live-aboard  small  fur- 
nished sailboat.  Cool  ocean  breezes.  Full-se- 
curity. Microwave,  refrigerator,  telephone- 
capability.  Marina  bathrooms/showers,  1(X)-ft 
away.  $37ymo.,  includes  utilities.  310-827- 
0497. 


65  Townhiouse  for  Sale 


3+2.5+BONUS  RM 

WLA.  Bike  to  UCLA.  TcMvnhouse,  private  ga- 
rage, Fireplace.  Fabulous  end  unit!  $229,000. 
Prudential  California  Realty.  Agent,  310- 
827-5512. 


67  Condos  for  Sole 


Westwood  Condo 

Spacious  l-bdrnV2-ba.  2  security  parking 
spaces,  S-bkxks  to  campus,  pod,  sauru, 
A/C.  heat.  24-hr  security  guard,  cable,  laun- 
dry, appliarwxs,  balcony  view.  Please  call 
310-475-9231.  Must  scell 


69  Condos  for  Rent 


FAB  FURN  CONDO 

WESTWOOD.  Ibdrm.  Indudes  utihies 
pool/|acuzzi/sauna/xym,  24hr  security  buiki- 
ing/^parking.  $110QAno.  lease,  1440  Veteran. 
Avail.  June.  Pets  OK.  310-553-4227. 


SHERM/^N  OAKS.  Bright,  spacious,  2- 
bdrTTV2-ba.  Pool,  Jacuzzi,  fireplace,  balcony, 
rec  room.,  gated  garage,  VC,  top  fkxir,  large 
storage.  $110QAno.  818-981-1607. 

W>VLK  TO  UCLA 


WESTWOOD.  2-bdmV2-ba.  TV  security 
buiMing.  Central  air.  Gas  fireplace.  Bakony. 
$1200/mo.  310-473-7872. 

WESTWOOD  ADJACENT.  $1100.  2-bdrnV2- 
ba.  Fireplace,  bakor^,  appliarx^s,  pool,  kick 
buikiinR.  Sunny,  quiet  310-553-6662. 


71  Vocation  Rentals 


BEAUTIFUL  SPACKXIS  YOSEMITE  HOME 
SURROUNDED  BY  TALL  PINES.  CLOSE  TO 
EVERYTHING.  FULLY  EQUIPPED.  S'OOO 
ELEVATK)N.  DECK.  REASONABLE  RATES 
818-785  1028  X60303. 

House  in  Provence 

Rent  our  small  1 6lh-ccntury  house  w/garden 
in  Provence.  Near  Avigrwn.  Panaramic  views 
of  wine  country.  Superb  cycling,  markctir>^ 
hiking.  310-477>6869. 

IDYLLWILD 

BEAUTIFUL  ALL  YEAR  RETREAT.  FULLY 
equipped.  Fireplaces,  hot  tub,  sleeps  54. 
Daily,  weakly,  monthly.  Call  Envesto, 
Home:31 0-39 1-6606.  Wbrk:825-257S. 


78  Misc.  Activities 


AUDITIONS:  Vocalists  and  musicians  want- 
ed to  form  band  for  cortmmpomy  Christian 
church  services  and  spedal  events.  310-202- 
6613. 


91   Insurance 


MOTORCYCLE/MOTORSCOOTER  IN- 

SURANCL  Great  rates.  Personal  Service. 
MastcrcarcVVisa  accepted.  Call  for  qukJc 
quotes.  C  Diamorwi  Insurarxx  310-428- 
4995. 


Allstate 

Insurance  Company 
(310)312-0204 

1317  Westwood  Blvd. 
(2  biks.  So.  of  Wilshire) 


92  Legal  Advice 


Lancilorci  Problems? 

Repairs  Neecied? 

Carpets?     Painting? 

Deposit  Returnees? 

Paralegal  Help  CJheapI 

Free  Consultation 

(310)  aao-oo9e 


94  Movers/Storage 


BEST  MOVERS  Spiece  special  as  fow  as 
$68.00.  No  job  too  small.  24lt  truck.  Call  us 
first  T-l  63844.  213-263-2378,  213-263- 
BEST. 

HONEST  MAN.  W/14fl  truck  and  dollies, 
small  jobs,  short  rwtice  ok.  Student  discour^t 
310-285-6688.  CA,  AZ,  NV.  <^  Bmlns. 

JERRY'S  MOVING  &  DaiVERY.  The  careful 
nrK>vers.  Experienced,  reliable,  same  day  de- 
livery. Packing,  boxes  available.  Jerry,  310- 
391-5657.  GO  uaAII 

TOA^  MOVING  SERVICE.  DEPENDABLE, 
EXPERIENCED,  REASONABLE.  LAST 
MINUTE  JOBS  WELCOME.  CALL  24  HRS. 
3103973607. 


SUMMER  STORAGE 

*Free  pick  up     - 
available 
*  Reasonable  rates 

WESTSIDE 
SELF  STORAGE 

826-5900 


95  Personal  Service 


l^duiird  Fnferprises 


VISA  MASTERCARD 
GUARANTEED  APPROVAL 

NO  CREDIT,  BAD  CREDIT,  LOW 

INCOME,  BANKRUPTCY 

M    NO  PROBLEM    • 

CHOOSE  YOUR  CREDIT  LIMIT 

FREE  INFORMATION  WRITE 

1626  N  WILCOX  AVE  #705.  LOS  ANGLES,  CA  90028 


96  Services  Offered 


$BIG  BUCKS$ 

TO  MAKE  YOUR  MONEY  WORK  FOR  YOU 
call  Cvolyn  310-223-8376  for  more  infcirma- 
tion.  Stockbroker. 


Research,  Writing,  Editing 

ALL  levels,  -  ALL  subjects  Foreign 

Students  Welcome  Fast  Professional  - 

Quality  guaranteed  papers  not  for  sale 

Call  Research  310-477-8226 

M'F  10:00am- 5 :00rm 


1 -STOP  RESEARCH 

Expert  databaie  tearchter  of  all  medical,  pKar- 
maceutical,  biotech,  ptychological  databaso 
•fmore.  Get  articlet  copied  arid  bcxiks  deliv- 
ered.  310-478-7221. 

ATTN:  MBA,  LAW, 
MED.  APPLICANTS 

rruttriled  developing/editing  your  critically- 
important  personal  (talements?  Get  profet- 
fional  help,  competitive  edge  from  national- 
ly-known  author/contuKant.  3 10-826-4445 


BEAR'S  RESEARCH. 
WRITING  ft  EDITING 

AN  tubiacts.  ThMM/DttMrtttiont. 

Pertonal  Statements.  PropoMti  and  books 

Intamattonal  ttudanti  wekxxTW. 

SINCE  1966 

ShTon  B— r.  Ph.D.  (310)  470-6662 


Daily  Bruin  Sports 


Wednesday,  May  24, 1995    27 


A 


Throwing:  This  year's  squad  has  a  shot  at  five  NCAA  individual  titles 

From  page  28 


declined  to  comiTient  on  the  suit. 

But  through  it  all,  Venegas 
has  continually  attracted  the 
nation's  top  prep  throwers 
to  UCLA.  Five  years  ago,  it  was 
Dumble  who  recognized  the  tradi- 
tion and  opportunities  presented  by 
Venegas'  program. 

"What  sparked  me  was  how 
many  great  throwers  he  had 
coached  and  how  much  they  had 
improved,"  Dumble  said.  "I  just 
realized  when  I  came  on  my 
recruiting  trip  what  a  great  atmos- 
phere he  has  developed." 

A  similar  appeal  influenced 
Godina,  who  was  willing  to  give  up 
scholarship  money  four  years  ago 


so  that  he  cou-^d  train  under 
Venegas. 


"What  sparked  me  was 

how  many  great 

throwers  [Venegas]  had 

coached  and  how  much 

they  had  improved." 
Dawn  Dumble 

UCLA  Thrower 


"Art  was  the  only  reason  to 
come  here,"  Godina  said.  "The 
only  other  reason  to  come  here  was 


the  sunshine,  and  the  sun  doesn't 
shine  all  the  time.  Even  if  I  would 
have  had  to  pay  fof  five  years,  I 
would  have  come  here  " 

Last  year.  Track  and  Field 
News'  High  School  Athlete  of  the 
Year  Suzy  Powell  came  to  the  same 
conclusion.  And  this  year,  with  the 
depth  of  their  squad,  UCLA's 
throwers  may  post  the  finest  per- 
formance in  the  history  of  the 
NCAA  meet. 

Already  this  .season,  Powell  has 
broken  the  American  junior  record 
in  the  discus,  Valeyta  Althouse  has 
broken  the  American  collegiate 
record  in  the  shot  put,  and  Godina 
now  leads  the  world  in  the  shot  put. 

Heading  into  next  week's 


Outdoor  Championships,  Dumble 
and  Powell  are  ranked  first  and  sec- 


"Wej3  up  for  five 

titles  ...  and  if  we  only 

get  three  out  of  five, 

we're  doing 

awesome." 
Art  Venegas 

UCLA  Weight  Events  Coach 

ond  in  the  women's  discus. 
Althouse  and  Dumble  are  ranked 
first  and  second  in  the  women's 


shot  put,  while  Godina  and  Mark 
Parlin  are  first  and  third  in  the 
men's  shot  put.  Godina  is  first  in 
the  men's  discus  and  Greg  Johnson 
is  second  in  the  men's  jfivelin. 

All  said,  UCLA  has  a  legitimate 
chance  at  winning  five  of  the  seven 
throwing  events. 

"Let's  see  what  kind  of  batting 
record  we  can  get,"  Venegas  said. 
"We're  up  for  five  titles,  and  we 
might  end  up  with  only  three  or 
four,  but  the  fact  that  the  athletes 
maximize  their  potential  that  day  is 
what  excites  me  the  most. 

"And  if  we  only  get  three  out  of- 
five,  we're  doing  awesome.  There's 
probably  no  other  school  that  will 
have  three  titles." 


96  Services  Offered 


BE  A  LICENSED  STOCKBROKER  To  sell 
stocks,  bonds...  Work  full/part  time.  License 
course  available.  No  prior  academic  require- 

ment.  213-462-0101. 

CALL  ME  NOW  I  RESUMES,  THESES,  DIS 
SERTATK3NS,  SEMESTER  PAPERS,  drafts,  re- 
writes, math  papers,  etc  Many  years  experi- 
ence, state  of  art  aquipnient  Will  consider 
your  budget.  Please  call  Michelle  Kohn,  213- 
653-0444.  

CONQUER  TEST 
ANXIETY 

Within  hours  with  hyprws is- Improved  recall- 
Better  grades.  Low  group  rates.  310-399- 
0233. 

EAGLE-EYED  PROOFREADER 

Edits,  theseVpublications;  tutors  English/study 
skills;  trains  time  management/stress  reduc- 
tion.  Nadia  Lawrence,  PhD.  310393-1951. 
EXPERIENCED  WRITER/EDITOR  to  word-pro- 
cess your  draft-to-final  resume,  thesis,  manu- 
script, research  paper.  Quick  turrvaround, 
reasonable  rates.  Marina  del  Rey.  Renee, 
310-578-1744. 

Prize-Winning  Essayist 

wAwo  PhDs  can  help  you  produce  winning 
prose.  Theses,  papers,  personal  statements. 
David  310-459-8088,  310-459-3139. 

PROFESSIONAL  WRITINCVEDITINC.  Papers, 
reports,  statistics,  proposals,  studies,  projects. 
Masters,  Ph.D,  dissertatiorv,  college  applica- 
tion essays.  Any  subject,  style,  requirement 

213-871-1333. 

WANT  TO  BE  ACCEPTED?  Save  tirry;,  frustra- 
tion? Call  (or  helpdevetopin^editingpersorv 
al  statements.  Also  edit  papers,  theses,  dis- 
sertations. Unda  310-392-1734. 


98  Tutoring  Offered 


-MY  TUTOR-  MAT>VPHYSK3/STATISTK3. 
Tutoring  serlcc.  Free  consultation.  Reasorv 
able  ratas,  call  anytime.  Computerized  statis- 
tical analysis  available.  Ilan  (800)90-TUTOR. 

ENGLISH  TUTOR 

ALL  AGES.  Reading  Comprehension,  Writing 
Skills,  SAT  Preparation,  E.S.L.,  Paper  Editinj^ 
Proofreadir>g.  Qualified  instructor/published 
writer.  Stephanie  310-395-4688. 

INT'L  STUDENTS 

Sper>d  your  break  practicir^  Ertglish  in  F/T  irv 
terwive  courses  at  Anglo-Continental.  For 
more  infomnHion,  call  909-621  -4434. 

MATH  TUTORING  by  PH.D.  $2(Vhour.  CaU 
cuius,  statistics,  probability,  math  (or  physi- 
cal/social sciences,  SAS,  CRE,  SPSS,  MCAT. 
3i0-837-8996,  paffer,  310- 562-9626  NBO. 


99  Tutoring  Needed 


NEED  CHEAP  FfALIAN  lessons.  Conversation 
for  visiting  college  student,  June-August.  Call 
Ray,  919-443-0373 

RUSSIAN  TUTOR  NEEDED.  1  hour/week  on 
or  near  campus.  Will  pay.  Call  Angela  310- 
794-3033. 


100  Typing 


A  CLASS  ACT 

Papcn,  letters,  resumes,  scripts,  transcription, 
labels.  FREE  llgN  editing.  Laser  printing.  Spell 
check.  Fax  Ordws>^ekome.  310-827-8023. 

ACE  TYPIST,  ETC 

GREAT  LOOKING  WP-ALL  TYPES- 
RESUMES,  APPLICATIONS  (INCL.  AMCAS), 
ETC.  SPECIAL  RATE  FOR  PAPERS.  FAST, 
FRICNIXY    SERVKTE.     RUSHES.     310-«20- 

8630. 

MODERN  SECRETARIAL  SERViaS.  24-hour 
service,  pick^jp  and  delivery,  IBM  and  MAC, 
Laser  prirtlinc.  Discourtt  studenU.  5-minutes 
from  UCLA.  310-446-8899. 

TYPE  ESSAYS,  TERM  PAPERS,  THESES  AND 
dissertations.  SI.SQ^Mne  213^734-6547. 

WORD  PROCESSING  specializing  in  theses, 
dissertatkirts,  transcription,  resumes,  fliers, 
brochures,  mailing  lisU,  reports.  Santa  Moni- 
ca,    31&626-6939.    Hollywood,    213-466- 


WO«D  PROaSSINC-  All  typ«,  APA  and 

olh«r  formats,   tranicribing,    resumwt,   DTP, 

WordPffbO,  charts,  graphs,  later.  Reaaorv 

-fUk  rates,  near  campus.  310-470-0287. 


102  Music  Lessons 


DRUM  LESSONS 

All  Icvel^tyles  with  dedicated  professiorul. 
At  your  home  or  WLA  studio.  1  st  lesson  free. 
No  drum  set  necessary.  Neil  21 3-658-5491 . 

GUITAR  INSTRUCTION.  15  years  EXP.  all 
levels  ar>d  styles.  Patient  and  organized. 
GuiUrs  available.  Sam  310-826-91 17. 


GUfTAR  LESSONS  by  a  professional  near 
UCLA.  All  levels,  guiUrs  available.  Call  jean 
310-476-4154. 


104  Resumes 


WINNING  RESUMES 

1-hour  service.  Our  clients  get  results.  Open 
7  days.  Visa  and  Mastercard  accepted.  310- 
287-2785. 

in9AiHi:^il 

♦make  professional  quality 
rcsLunes  -  every  time  !!!* 

FOR  tcmplatc  and  manual 
/SCNO  $5  cmccn  on  momev  oaocn  to 

TRUOOS  CO.  P.O.  Box  20206  iMtg  Btth,  CA 
90M1-4206 


105  Travel 


105  Travel 


DO  EUROPE 
$269  ANYTIME! 

If  you're  a  little  flexible,  we  can  help  you 
beat  the  airline's  prices.  NY,  HAWAII  SI  29. 
AIRHITCH  tm.  310-394-0550.  IntemetAir- 
hltcf^O  netcom.com. 

EUROPE,  $249  q\v.  CARIBBEAN/MEXKIO, 
$249  rA.  NYC,  $129.  If  you  can  beat  these 
prices,  start  your  own  damn  airiirw.  Air- Tech 
Ltd.,  310-4720866.  infb«aerolech.com. 


KENYA 


AFFORDABLE  SAFARIS.  3-Week  Safari- 
$2650;  2- Week  Safari-  $2250,-  10-Day  Safari- 
Si  800;  7-Day  Safari-  $1600.  Price  does  not 
iiK:lude  airfare.  Beveriy  Hills  African  Safaris: 
213-6S5-193S.  


STUDENT 

DISCOUNTS 


•  (omprrhenj|«  Servlcei 

•  free  Titket  Delivery  on  (omput 

•  Order  by  Phone 


SAVE  UP  TO 


Ml 


on  domestic  travel. 

Stop  by  and  compare 
our  prices 

/1SUCL4/' 


Cull  UGAfLVM/S  2359 


Frankfurt 

$259 

Amsterdam 

$279* 

Paris 

$285' 

Athens 

$415' 

Tokyo 

$25r 

*r«<a  we  each  way  hom  I  ot  Anqrtes  bned  on  * 
rtxndlrv  pKctMic  Celtnrestnclcramv/ w>^ 
(ncludins  ftudentAejcher  ttMin  requcemcrtj) 
ma  laies  ml  nckjded  CM  lor  ottta  dt\tr\»Kn 

Open  Saturdays  10am  -  2pm 

Council  lyavei 

10904  Lixfcrcxjk  Df ,  los  Ansete,  CA  90094 

310-208-3551 


Amenca's  Oldest  and  Largest 
Student  Travel  Orsanization 


109  Autos  for  Sole 


1990  BMW  325i-  White,  automatic,  puwer 
everything  excellent  corviition,  original  own- 
er. $11,500.  Also,  1988  TOYOTA  CELICA. 
Corrvcrtible,  black,  automatic,  runs  great. 
S6000.  )lO-838^8845. ~~    '    ' 

LOW  MILEAGE 

'93  MERCURY  TRACER.  4-door,  10K  miles, 
loaded,  automatic.  Original  owner. 
leOOO/obo.  310-842-8403. 


VW  FOX.  while,  2-door,  1988,  4-spc«l, 
88,000  miles,  4-<peakar  radio,  cxceller^  rurv 
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TODAY'S 
CROSSWORD  PUZZLE 


ACROSS 

1  Dry  by  soaking 

up 
5  Sound  judgment 
10  —  on:  act  like  a 

grandparent? 

14  Overhang 

1 5  Singer  Cara 

16  Always 

1 7  Nose  to  the  — 

19  Not  far 

20  Total 

21  "—Girls" 

22  Bothers 

23  Style 

25  Wooden  club 

26  Eternities 

30  Burrowed 

31  Taste 
34  Ladle 
36  Kinds 

38  Barrel 

^9  Japanese 

warrior 
41  Originating 

43  Actress 
MacGraw        ' 

44  Choose 

46  Feel 

47  New  Englander 
49  Electrical  unit 

51  Ripened 

52  Actress  Jillian 

53  FoHow 
55  Reminder 

57  And  so  on 

58  Candle 

62  Siberia's 
continent 

63  Melodramatic 

66  Trudge 

67  Brass 

68  Small  group 

69  "My  Three  — " 

70  Church  table 

71  Search 


PREVIOUS  PUZZLE  SOLVED 


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3-8  95 


O  1995  Urutad  Feature  Syndicale 


DOWN 

1  pi««r ^ 

2  Actress  — 
Flynn  Boyle 

3  Roman  poet 

4  Take  care  of 

5  Said  "yeth " 

6  Morsel 

7  Earth  science 

8  Secret 

9  High  notes 

10  Refusal 

1 1  Catching  up 

12  Tropica!  wood 

1 3  Goes  astray 
18  Flop 

24  Charmer 

25  Foundation 

26  Theme 

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28  Conver>lion 
outcome 

29  Old  French  coin 


31  —capita 

32  Fidgety 

33  —  on  (incited) 
35  Pnmp 

37  Trails 

40  Malt  beverage 
42  Shark's  home 
45  Musical 

performance 
48  Works  dough    . 
50  Grumble 

53  Singer  Merman 

54  Play  It  by  — 

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capital 

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59  Core 

60  Beige 

61  Apnl  shower 

64  Actress 
Gardner 

65  Fortune 


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28    WednMClay,  May  24, 1995 


Daily  Bruin  Sports 


From  page  32 


Vanegas  lifts  UCLA's  program  to  the 


of  it,"  Vcncgas  said.  "You're  sup- 
posed to  have  a  really  bad  year 
occasionally,  but  we  haven't  had  too 
much  of  that." 

The  down  side  is  that  Venegas 
has  not  been  able  to  please 
every  athlete  who  has  come 
through  the  program.  In  fact,  some 
of  the  nation's  top  prospects  have 
left  Westwood  for  other  programs.    , 


"We've  had  athletes  who  were  so 
used  to  being,  the  only  star  at  their 
high  school,  aiid  they  realized,  'You 
know  what,  I  don't  like  to  be  in  a 
group,'"  Venegas  said.  "When  you 
come  to  UCLA,  no,  matter  how  big 
a  star  you  are,  you  are  suddenly  one 
of  the  group." 

Even  worse,  the  success  of 
Venegas'  athletes  has  led  to 
unfounded  allegations  of  steroid 


use.  To  counter  those,  the  coach 
points  to  the  fact  that  his  throwers 
are  constantly  tested  by  the 
University  and  are  also  subject  to 
random  surprise  tests  by  USA  Track 
and  Field  and  the  International 
Athletic  Federation. 

"There  arc  always  rumors  about 
any  successful  programs,  particular- 
ly in  the  throws,"  Venegas  said. 
"That  goes  with  the  territory,  but  for 


me  to  defend  the  kids  in  the  press  is 
counterproductive.  It's  like  a  person 
who  protests  too  much  -  you  kind 
of  wonder  what  the  deal  is." 

Venegas  himself  was  involved  in 
a  steroid-rumor  lawsuit  two  years 
ago.  The  University  of  Georgia's 
Brent  Noon,  a  competitor  of 
Godina,  filed  a  suit  against  several 
track  organizations  when  he  was 
suspended  by  USA  Track  and  Held 


shortly  before  the  1992  U.S. 
Olympic  trials.  ' 

According  to  Noon,  who  had 
missed  an  out-of-competition  drug 
test,  the  suspension  arose  from 
steroid  rumors  allegedly  Started  by 
Venegas. 

Eventually,  Noon  settled  out  of 
court  with  UCLA,  and  both  parties 

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Thursday,  May  25th 

8:00  PM 
Jan  Popper  Theater 

John  Daversa  Junk  Wagon  Sketches 

Todd  Sickafoose  Dialogue  in  C 

Chandar  Wood  /  Thank  You  God  For 
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Ryan  Dorin  Music  for  most  of  a 

Piano,  Alto  Flute,  Bass  Trombone, 

Double  Bass,  Wind  Chimes  and  a 

Drum 

Susan  Wang  Hope 

Paul  Gutierrez  Mr.  Jiminy 

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Korean  folk  tune 

Luis  Saglie  Music  for  Piano  four 
hands  and  Percussion 

•  Performers  include: 


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Matt  Cody,  Kerry  Farrell,  Flizatietli  Wrlglit, 

Todd  Siclcafoose,  Shulclii  Komiyama,  Ryan  Dorin, 

Chandar  Wood,  Erin  Wood,  Susan  Wang, 

Esther  Dimberger,  Paul  Gutierrez,  Dave  Beaudry, 

Alan  Ferber,  Mark  Ferber,  Luis  Saglie,  Judy  Huang, 

Rocky  Waters,  Regino  Madrid,  Zakarias  Grafllio, 

Matt  Nak^Hirs 


Daily  Bruin  Sports 


Wednesday,  May  24, 1995    29 


UCLA  Sports  Into 

Senior  Jennifer  Brundage  doused  her  teammates  with  water  in 
their  hotel  rooms  while  on  a  road  trip  to  the  Bay  Area. 


BRUNDAGE 


From  page  32 

decided  to  get  bacic  at  her  and  it 
got  her  good.  She  was  soalced." 

Brundage  then  proceeded  to 
team  up  with  her  roommate  on 
the  trip,  Nicole  Odom,  to^ouse 
six  otlier  teammates  with  water 
before  she  switched  to  putting 
toothpaste  on  the  earpieces  of  the 
telephones. 

"Nicole  and  I  got  the  people  to 
leave  their  rooms  and  then  I  went 
in  and  put  toothpaste  on  the 
phones  in  their  room,"  Brundage 
said.  'Then,  when  they  got  bacic 
to  their  rooms,  we  would  call 
them  and  they  would  get  tooth- 
paste in  their  hair  and  their  ears. 

"But  of  course,  later  that  night 
I  went  in  and  took  the  phones 
apart  and  cleaned  them  so  it  did- 
n't do  any  damage." 

Naturally,  her  UCLA  team- 
mates don't  just  sit  back  and  wait 
for  Brundage  to  strike.  More 
often  than  not,  it  turns  into  a 
major  league  battle. 

"The  team  likes  to  tease  her  a 
lot  and  she  ends  up  being  the  butt 
of  most  of  their  jokes,"  Inouye 
said.  "This  week  (at  the  NCAA 
Regional)  they  have  already 
thought  of  putting  lotion  on  the 
toilet  seat  and  Kool-Aid  in  the 
shower  head  .so  that  she  turns  pur- 
ple when  she  turns  on  the  water. 

"But  no  one  knows  exactly 
how  they  are  going  to  get  Jen 
Brundage  back  for  all  the  jokes 
she  has  played  the  past  four 
years." 

On  the  field,  the  senior  is  all 
business.  She  takes  great  pride  in 
every  at-bat  and  every  ground  ball 
or  line  drive  that  is  hit  to  her.  And 
her  hard  work  is  reflected  on  the 
Stat  sheets. 

As  a  freshman.  Brundage 
helped  UCLA  win  the  national 
title  and  received  second-team 
All-Pac-10  honors  while  playing 
in  right  field. 

But  it  was  last  season,  when 
Brundage  was  moved  to  third 
ba.se,  that  the  Irvine  native  began 
to  receive  national  attention.  She 
was  named  a  first  team  Ail- 
American  with  a  .440  batting 
average  and  posted  20  multiple 
hit  games. 

"A  lot  of  times,  athletes  with 
her  type  of  physical  talents  will 
mature  very  quickly  because  they 
know  the  type  of  of  impact  they 
will  have  on  the  program," 
Backus  said.  "But  in  Jen's  case, 
she  was  always  solid  but  got  bet- 
ter and  belter  every  year.  She  has 


a  real  inner  confidence  now  even 
though  she  won't  succeed  every 
time.  Before,  I  think  she  doubted 
herself  a  lot,  but  not  anymore." 
• — 54»is  season,  Brundage  has 
been  at  the  top  of  her  game. 

Despite  a  mid-season  slump, 
she  has  returned  to  form  and 
leads  the  nation  in  batting  with  a 
.517  average.  She  has  already 
broken  the  school  records  for 
home  runs  in  a  single  season  (14) 
and  career  home  runs  (20),  as 
well  as  career  and  single-season 
RBIs. 

In  addition  to  all  of  the  acco- 
lades she  has  received  for  her 
ability  on  the  field,  Brundage 
maintained  a  3.75  GPA  her  fresh- 
man season,  and  as  a  communica- 
tion studies  student  has  been 
named  an  Academic  All- 
American  for  the  past  three  sea- 
sons. 

As  the  Bruins  prepare  to  face 
Iowa  in  the  first  round  of  the 
College  World  Series  Thursday 
night,  Brundage  is  hoping  to  get  a 
chance  to  finish  her  career  the 
same  way  it  began  -  with  a 
national  title. 

"Ending  my  four  years  here 
with  another  title,  that  would  be 
th&  best,"  Brundage  said.  "But 
regardless  of  what  happens  in  the 
end,  I  will  remember  this  team 
because  of  how  much  fun  I  have 
had  and  the  great  chemistry  that 
this  team  has." 

With  her  name  solidified  in  the 
Bruin  record  books,  there  is  no 
question  that  Brundage  will  be 
remembered  as  one  of  the  best 
athletes  to  play  softball  at  UCLA. 
But  more  than  her  statistics, 
Brundage  wants  to  be  remem- 
bered for  the  atmosphere  she 
helped  create  off  the  field. 

"I  don't  really  know  how  they 
will  remembe>  me  as  a  player," 
Brundage  said.  "But  1  would  like 
for  them  to  remember  me  as  a  fun 
person  to  be  around.  I  always  try 
to  make  people  laugh." 

From  a  coaching  standpoint. 
Backus  feels  that  filling  the  shoes 
of  such  an  accomplished  player 
will  t>e  a  difficult  job. 

"She  epitomizes  the  student 
athlete,"  Backus  said.  "She  takes 
her  studies  very  seriously  and,  to 
have  that  kind  of  drive  in  the 
classroom  and  on  the  softball 
field,  you  can't  ask  for  more. 

"It  will  be  interesting  to  see 
what  face  this  team  takes  on  next 
year  without  her" 


mrr 


You're  thinking. 

You're  talking. 

You  have  ideas. 

You  want  others  to  hear  them. 

The  Viewpoint  editors  are  waiting 
for  your  submi.ssions. 

Any  questions  call  825-2216 

Fax,  c/o  Viewpoint  (310)  206-0906 

E-mail  to  viewpoint@asucla.ucla.edu. 


Daily  Bruin 


THIS  WEEK  AT 

Copeland's  Sports 


TEVA  SPORT  SANDALS 


CAMPING  &  BACKPACKING 


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WESTWOOD 

HOURS  MON  f  f^M  0  9  SAl  1  f)  R  SI  )N  1 1  U 


^ 


30    Wednesday,  May  24, 1995 


Daily  Bruin  Sports 


\ 


I 


DATING  DISASTERS? 

Relationship  Falling  Apart? 

"He  said  he  would  call..." 

"I  can't  think  of  what  to  say..." 

"She's  not  interested  anymore..." 


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mistakes  again. 


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(310)  574-5344 

In  the  heart  of  Marina  del  Rey  •  16  years  on  the  VVestside 
Visa,  Mastercard,  American  Express  accepted 


A  day  in  the  life  of 
Rodman:  gay  bars 
and  suicide  dreams 


The  Associated  Press 

NEW  YORK  —  Get  a  load  of 
the  latest  fashion  statement  from 
Dennis  Rodman:  Shiny  tank  top, 
metallic  hot  pants  and  rhinestone 
dog  collar. 

"Why  not  be  a  little  risque?" 
said  Rodman,  who  posed  in  the 


"(Madonna)  wanted 

to  get  married.  She 

wanted  to  have  my 

baby." 
Dennis  Rodman 


outfit  for  the  cover  of  this  week's 
Sports  Illustrated.  "Push  the  enve- 
lope." 

The  orange-haired  San  Antonio 
Spurs  rebel  also  delved  into  his 
personal  life  in  an  interview  with 
the  "magazine,  speaking  of  ex-girl- 
friend Madonna. 

"She  wanted  to  get  married," 
Rodman  said.  "She  wanted  to 
have  my  baby.  She  .said,  'Be  in  a 
hotel  room  in  Las  Vegas  on  this 
specific  day  so  you  can  get  me 
pregnant.'" 

Sports  Illustrated  also  .said  that 
Rodman  frequents  gay  bars  and 
doesn't  shy  away  from  hugging 
and  kissing  male  friends.  He  said 
that's  as  far  as  it  has  gone,  "but  I 


visualize  being  with  another  man. 
Everybody  visualizes  being  gay  - 
they  think,  'Should  I  do  it  or  not?* 
The  reason  they  can't  is  because 
they  think  it's  unethical.  They 
think  it's  a  sin,"  he  said. 

"Hell,  you're  hot  bad  if  you're 
gay,  and  it  doesn't  make  you  any 
less  of  a  person,"  he  told  the  mag- 
azine. 

Rodman  also  said  he  dreams 
about  suicide. 

"Sometimes  I  dream  about  just 
taking  a  gun  and  blowing  my  head 
off,"  he  said.  "If  I  ever  know  it's 
time  to  die,  I'll  head  for  a  water- 
fall and  camp  out  for  a  day,  know- 
ing I  only  have  24  hours  to  live 
(and)  fiy  off  the  waterfall." 

Rodman's  dyed  hair,  tattoos  and 
body  piercings  drew  as  much 
attention  this  year  as  his  rebound- 
ing. 

He  was  suspended  for  three 
games  at  the  start  of  the  season 
because  of  disruptive  conduct  dur- 
ing preseason,  and  was  then  given 
a  3  1/2-week  paid  leave  of 
absence. 

When  he  balked  at  returning 
when  the  leave  of  absence 
expired,  he  was  suspended  with- 
out pay  again,  but  was  reinstated 
two  days  later. 

He  returned  to  lead  the  NBA  in 
rebounding  for  the  fourth  straight 
year,  but  missed  two  weeks  late  in 
the  season  with  an  injured  shoul- 
der after  he  fell  off  his  motorcycle. 


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leads  series  1  -0 

Wednesday.  May  24 

Houston  at  San  Antonio.  5  30  p  m 

fTNT)     ■       -     .  ■    -■ 

Thursday.  May  25 

Indiana  at  Orlando,  5pm  (TNT) 

Friday.  May  26 

San  Antonio  at  Houston,  6  p  m  (TNT) 

Saturday,  May  27 

Orlando  at  Indiana.  12  30  p  m  (NBC) 

Sunday,  May  28 

San  Antonio  at  Houston.  12  30  p  m 
rNBC) 


NHL  Playoff  Glance 


it  necessary 

N  Y  Rangers  at  Ptiiiadelphia.  TBA.  il 

necessary 

New  Jersey  at  Piftsburgti,  TBA 


San  Jofta-Detroit  Bon  Score 


San  Jose 
Detroit 


0  0  2-2 
420-6 


CONFERENCE  S^IUFIMALI 

(Best-of-7) 

Tuesday,  May  23 

Detroit  6,  San  Jose  2.  Detroit  leads 
series  2-0 

Chicago  2.  Vancouver  0.  Ctiicago  leads 
series  2-0 

Wednesday.  May  24 

Philadelphia  at  N  Y  ftangers.  4  30  p  m 
^  (ESPN2) 
Pittsburgh  at  New  Jersey,  4  30  p  m 

Thursday,  May  25 

Chicago  at  Vancouver,  7  p  m.  (ESPN2) 
Detroit  at  San  Jose,  7  30  p  m  (ESPN) 

Friday.  May  2« 

Pttitadetphia  at  N  Y  Rangers,  4  30  p  m 

(ESPN) 

PIttstHjrgh  at  Nev»  Jersey.  4  30  p  m 

(ESPN2) 

taliirtfay,  May  27 

Chicago  at  Vancouver,  12  p  m. 

(ESPN2) 

Detroit  at  San  Jose.  4:30  p  m  (ESPN) 

tMiay,  MayZI 

Vancouver  at  Oiicago,  12  p.m.  (FOX). 


Flffl  period  —  Scoring  1 .  Detroit. 
Cotfey  3  (Y/erman,  Errey),  1  37  2, 
Detroit.  Fedorov  2  (power  play) 
(Coffey.  Lidstrom),  9  38  3,  Detroit, 
f/erman  2  (Errey),  12  07  4.  Detroit, 
Ciccarelli  6  (Primeau),  14  47  Penalties 
Kyte.  SAN  (cross  checking),  8:06; 
Ko/lov  DFT  (high  sticking).  15  55 
Second  period  —  Scoring  5.  Detroit. 
Fedorov  3  (power  play)  (Y/erman. 
Ciccarelli).  14  01  6.  Detroit.  Brown  2 
(shorthanded)  (Fedorov).  1945. 
Penalties  Baker,  SAN  (holding).  817.- 
Odgers.  SAN  (slashing),  12  54, 
Ciccarelli,  DET  (interference),  19  10 
Third  period  —  Scoring  7,  San  Jose, 
Rathie  4  (power  play)  (Lanonov), 
6  01  8.  San  Jose,  Dahlen  5  (power 
play)  (Friesen,  More).  10:19 
Penalties  Primeau,  DET  (cross  check- 
ing). 5  53.  Errey,  DET  (holding),  8  44. 
Tancill.  SAN  (roughing^.  16  00:  V 
Konstantinov.  DET  (roughing),  16:00 


Chicaf(o^Vancouver  Box  S( 


New  York 
Detroit 
Toronto 
Baltimore 
Central  Division 

Cleveland 
Milwaukee 
Kansas  City 
Chicago 
Minnesota 
West  Division 

California 
Oakland 
Seattle 
Texas 


12  9 

11  13 

11  14 

9  13 


W 
16 


12  13 
10  14 

8  14 

8  16 

W  L 

15  9 

13  11 

12  11 

13  12 


.5711  1/2 
.458    4 
4404  172 
409    5 

Pet  GB 
6%  - 
480    4 
41751/2 
36461/2 
3337  1/2 

Pet  GB 
.625  - 
542    2 
.5222  1/2 
5202  1/2 


Tuesday's  Games 
Texas  at  Chicago,  ppd  .  ram 
Cleveland  5.  Milwaukee  3 
Detroit  6,  Minnesota  4,  7  innings 
Toronto  10,  Kansas  City  6 
Boston  at  Seattle  (n) 
Baltimore  at  Oakland  (n) 
New  York  at  California  (n) 


Tue»day  s  Sport»  Transactions 


BASEBAtL 


Vancouver 
Chicago 


000-0 
101  —2 


First  period  -  Scoring  1,  Chicago, 
Cummins  1  (Shant/,  Da^e),  13  56 
Penalties  Cullimore,  VAN  (tripping), 
1  58,  Lumme,  VAN  (holding  stick), 
5  11,  Momesso,  VAN  (holding).  9:12: 
Roenick.CHI  (roughing),  9:12: 
Amonte,  CHI  (elbowing),  15  40 
Second  period  —  Scoring  None 
Penalties  Roemck.  CHI  (interlerence). 
1036 

Third  period  ~  Scoring:  2.  Chicaoo.  ' 
Poulin  3  (Graham.  Russell),  5:46. 
Penalties  None 


Major  League  Baseball  Glance 


NAnONAL  LEAGUE  GLANCC 


AMERICAN  LEAGUE  GtANCE 

East  Olvlslofl 

Boston 


W 
14 


L      Pet  GB 
8      B36  - 


Eastern  Division 

Philadelphia 
Atlanta 
Montreal 
New  York 
Florida 
Central  Dhrision 

Chicago 
Cincinnati 
Houston 
St  Louis 
Pittsburgh 
West  Division 

Colorado 
San  Francisco 
Los  Angeles 
San  Diego 


W 
18 
15 
14 
10 
6 

W 
16 
13 
13 
11 
9 

W 
15 
13 
11 
11 


L 
6 
10 
12 
15 
19 

L 
8 
11 
12 
15 
15 

L 
11 

13 
14 
14 


Pet  GB 
750  ^ 
60031/2 
538    5 
40081/2 
240121/2 

Pet  GB 
667  — 
542  3 
.5203  1/2 
423  6 
375    7 

Pet.  GB 
.577  - 
500    2 
4403  1/2 
4403  1/2 


Tats4lay'i  Gamat 

Montreal  6.  San  Diego  4 
Philadelphia  6,  San  Francisco  5 
Cincinnati  10,  Houston  5 
FIOHda  6.  Pittsburgh  1 
Loe  Angalet  6.  New  Yorli  4 
Atlanta  7.  St  Louis  1 
Chicago  7,  Colorado  6 


Amoriean  League 

KANSAS  CITY  ROYALS— Agreed  to 
terms  with  Kevin  Appier,  pitcher,  on  a    ' 
one-year  contract 
National  League 

LOS  ANGELES  DODGERS— Purchased 
the  contract  of  Rick  Parker,  infielder- 
outfielder,  from  Albuquerque  of  the 
Pacific  Coast  League  Optioned  Felix 
Rodriguez,  pitcher,  to  Albuquerque 
Designated  Noe  Muno/,  catcher,  tor 
assignment 

MONTREAL  EXPOS- Traded  Roberto 
Kelly,  center  fielder,  and  Joey  Eischen 
pitcher,  to  the  Los  Angeles  Dodgers  for 
Henry  Rodriguez,  outfielder,  and  Jeff 
Treadway.  infielder 
ST  LOUIS— Purchased  the  contracts 
of  Scott  Hemond,  catcher,  and  Mark 
Petkovsek,  pitcher,  from  from 
Louisville  of  the  American  Association. 

FOOTBALL  ~         ZIIIZ 

National  Football  League 
CAROLINA  PANTHERS-Cut  Doug 
Pederson,  quarterback,  Charles  Swann, 
defensive  back,  Eric  Ball,  running  back: 
Dave  Garnett,  linebacker,  and  Barry 
Rose  and  Eric  Wier,  wide  receivers. 
GREEN  BAY  PACKERS— Signed  Craig 
Newsome,  cornerback,  and  Travis 
Jervey,  running  back 
Washington  Redskins— Signed  defen- 
sive back  Rk:h  Ovirens,  a  fifth  round 
draft  choice 

PITTSBURGH— Los  Angeles  police 
have  located  the  report  Oeon  Figures 
gave  offk:ers  following  a  highway 
shooting  10  days  ago  when  the 
Pittsburgh  Steelers  cornerback  was 
wounded  in  the  knee   The  report  lists 
Figures'  occupation  as  "ctothing 
designer"  Figures  plans  to  nrtarfcet  his 
own  line  of  clothing  this  fall. 


HOCKEY    . 

NatlOMi  Hockty  Laaflaa 

HARTFORD  WHALERS— Signed 
RotAn  Kron.  forward,  to  a  multiyear 
contract 

ST  LOUIS  BLUES— Announced  a  five- 
year  affiliation  agreonoent  with  the 
Worcester  IceCats  of  the  AHL. 


SItiKmUsei 


E  STATE-Namad  H. 


Keener  Fry  director  of  athletics 
FDU-TEANECK— Named  Gerald  Oswald 
director  of  athletics 
N  C  WESLEYAN— Announced  the  res- 
ignation of  Bill  Chambers,  men's  bas- 
ketball coach,  to  become  men's 
basketball  coach  and  cross  country 
coach  at  Greensboro  College. 

BASKETBALL 

NBA—  San  Antonio  Spurs  center  David 
Robinson  Tuesday  was  named  the 
NBAs  Most  Valuable  Player  for  the 
1994-95  season  after  leading  the  San 
Antonio  Spurs  to  a  league-best  record 
of  62-20 

GOLDEN  STATE— forward  Chris 
Galling  has  agreed  to  a  $90,000  settle- 
ment with  a  woman  who  sued  him 
after  she  broke  her  tailbone  in  a  bar 
incident   The  topless  dancer  said  she 
lost  $15,000  in  wages  during  her  recu- 
peration for  the  broken  coccyx 
CHICAGO  —  Chicago  Bulls  star  for- 
ward Scottie  Pippen  was  ordered 
Tuesday  to  pay  $10,000  to  a  former 
girlfriend  who  has  filed  a  paternity  suit 
claiming  he  is  the  father  of  her  1 -year- 
old  daughter 


Sports  Fact 


Players  drafted  No  1  overall  who  have 
won  an  NBA  or  NFL  championship  with 
that  original  team 

NBA 

Hakeem  Olajuwon  Hou  Rockets 

James  Worthy  LA  Lakers 

Earvin  "Magk:"  Johnson  LA  Lakers 
Bill  Walton    ,           Port  Trail  Blazers 

Kareem  Abdui-Jabbar  Mil  Bucks 

Ca/zie  Russell  NY  Knicks 


Frtinch  Optn 


The  seeded  players  tor  the  French 
Open  Tennis  Championships,  which 
begin  next  Monday  at  Paris: 

Man 

Name   Country         1995  Earnings 


1. 

2 

3 

4 

5 

6. 

7 

8 

9 

10 

11 

12 

13 

14 

15 

16 


Andre  Agassi       U.S.   $1 
Pete  Sampras      U.S. 
Boris  Becker       Ger 
Goran  Ivanisevic  Cro 
Thomas  Muster    Aus 
Michael  Chang     U.S. 
Sergi  Bruguera     Spa 
Wayne  Ferreira     Sou  Air 
Yevgeny  Kafelnikov  Rus 
Magnus  Larsson  Swe 
Alberto  Berasategui  Spa 


Michael  Stich 
Jim  Courier 
Todd  Martin 
Richard  Krajicek 
Marc  Rosset 


Ger 
U.S. 
U.S. 

Neth 
Swi 


023,060 
735.880 
531.493 
426,958 
877,693 
387.230 
292,950 
581.914 
523.919 
412.972 
160.600 
380,408 
359.899 
256.161 
582,084 
NA 


WonMR 


NFL 

Russell  Maryland 
Troy  Aikman 
Ed  "Too  Tall"  Jones 
Terry  Bradshaw 


Dallas  Cowboys 

Dallas  Cowt)oys 

Dallas  CowtKtys 

Pittsburg  Steelers 


Tuesday's  Sports  Trivia 


(Answers  will  be  printed  tomorrow) 

1   Who  holds  the  men's  NCAA  Division 
I  Basketball  record  for  points  in  a  sin- 
gle game? 

2.  Who  were  the  teams  the  Chicago 
iuNi  dafotod  m  the  NBA  Finals  whan 
tlwy  won  thatr  thraa  roniacuttve  twos? 


Name       Country      1995  Earnings 

1  Arantxa  Sanchez  Vicario  Sp  600.729 

2  Steffi  Graf  Ger    442.500 

3  Mary  Pierce  Fra     403.000 

4.  Conchita  Martinez    Spa    627,621 

5.  Jana  Novotna      C/e  Rep  250,542 

6  Magdalena  Maleeva  Bui  272,605 

7  Lindsay  Davenport   US  210.603 

8  Gabriela  Sabatini      Arg  210,615 

9  KimikoDate  Jap  304,975 

10  Natalia  Zvereva  Bel  314.662 

11  AnkeHuber  Ger  110.597 

12  IvaMajoli  CzeRep   134,429 

13.  Mary  Joe  Fernandez  U.S.  173.451 

14.  AnrtyFrazier            US  71,283 

15.  Helena  Sukova  CzeRep  56,895 

16.  Naoka  Sawamatsu  Jap  105,667 


Surf  f<ir«T.,mt  lor  Woilnosd.iy. 


Beach  Sri  Prd 

Los  Angeles  1-3  12 

Orange  County  2-4  12 

San  Diego  2-4  12 

Santa  Barbara-Ventura    t.-3  12 
Swell  direction:  Southwest. 

Compiled  By  Sean  Daly 
Soutcts  AP  wire  and  ESPN  Sportsione 


Daily  Bruin  Sports 


Wednesday,  May  24, 1995    31 


Despite  blindness,  siie's  aimost  Dunne  it  all 


By  Bob  Angus 

Imagine  yourself  flying  down  an 
Olympic  downhill  ski  slope  without  being 
able  to  open  your  eyes.  Imagine  going  45 
miles  an  hour  downhill  on  a  large  bicycle 
without  b^ing  able  to  see  oncoming  traffic. 

Cara  Dunne,  a  member  of  the  UCLA 
cycling  team,  knows  exactly  how  this  feels. 
She  has  been  blind  since  the  age  of  5  due  to 
a  rare  form  of  retinal  cancer.  Yet,  she  is  a 
downhill  ski  champion  and  an  accomplished 
cyclist. 

'The  words  that  come  to  mind  about  Cara 
are  dedicated  and  tenacious.  She  won't  let 
obstacles  get  in  her  way  and  never  takes  no 
for  an  answer,"  said  Maurine  Kelly,  the 
director  of  marketing  at  UCLA  recreation. 

Being  blind  has  never  held  Dunne  back. 
As  a  downhill  skier,  she  won  two  bronze 
medals  and  a  silver  in  the  1984  Winter 
Olympic  Games  for  the  Disabled.  Then,  in 
1988,  she  was  a  double  silver  medal  winner 
at  the  same  event.  She  flew  down  tremen- 
dously steep  slopes,  with  only  the  help  of  a 
guide  in  front  of  her  shouting  out  instruc- 
tions. 

"I  had  to  be  very  keyed  in  on  my  guide's 
auditory  signals,  becau.se  his  voice  was  my 
only  guide  down  the  mountain,"  Dunne 
said. 

While  continuing  to  ski  competitively, 
Dunne  tackled  Harvard  University.  Dunne 
had  previously  been  an  Illinois  state  scholar 
and  a  member  of  the  National  Honor 
Society,  while  a  high  school  student  in 
Chicago.  At  Harvard  she  made  an  immedi- 
ate impact.  She  was  voted  class  president  by 
her  classmates  and  founded  an  advocacy 
organization  for  disabled  students.  She 
received  her  degree  with  the  distinction  of 
magna  cum  laude  in  1992. 

"Being  elected  class  president  was  the 
thing  I  was  most  proud  of  at  Harvard," 
Dunne  said.  "I  was  chosen  by  my  class- 
mates which  was  a  great  honor  for  me." 


Unfortunately,  shortly  after  receiving  her 
degree,  Dunne  was  diagnosed  with  a  rare 
form  of  cancer  related  to  her  original  retinal 
malignancy. 

"I  just  had  to  live  with  it.  If  I  sat  around 
pitying  myself  it  would  have  been  my  own 
fault,"  Dunne  said. 

She  was  forced  to  quit  skiing  competi- 
tively, so  she  took  up  many  other  activities 
while  battling  the  cancer.  One  of  those 
activities  was  tandem  cycling. 

Typical  of  Dunne's  character,  she  fought 
the  cancer  hard  and  was  able  to  defeat  it 
quickly. 

"I  feel  like  1  have  a  second  chance  to  live 
life,  so  I'm  going  to  live  it  to  the  fullest,"  she 
said  of  beating  cancer  a  second  time. 

In  the  fall  of  1994,  Dunne  came  to  UCLA 
to  study  law.  She  is  currently  the  only  blind 
law  student  at  UCLA.  She  gets  through  the 
heavy  reading  load  at  law  school  with  audio 
tapes  and  books  written  in  Braille. 

"I  want  to  pursue  asjjects  of  law  which  I 
can  relate  to  and  work  for  change,  Dunne 
said.  "I  have  always  had  a  dream  to  help 
people  with  disabilities  get  the  rights  and 
opportunities  they  deserve." 

Wanting  to  continue  tandem  cycling 
while  at  UCLA,  Dunne  posted  flyers  in 
search  of  a  partner  to  ride  with.  UCLA  grad- 
uate student  Sonja  Fritzschc  saw  the  flyers 
and  decided  it  would  be  fun  to  team  up  with 
Dunne. 

"I  thought  why  not,  we  should  just  try  it 
and  see  what  happens,"  Fritzsche  said. 

Fritzsche  had  been  cycling  for  most  of 
her  life,  but  had  rarely  ridden  tandem.  She 
had  actively  competed  in  individual  cycling 
events  and  had  taken  part  in  many  cycling 
tours,  but  thought  it  would  be  exciting  and 
challenging  to  be  part  of  a  team.  She  says 
switching  from  a  single  person  bike  to  a  tan- 
dem cycle  is  like  "the  difference  between 
driving  a  car  and  driving  a  Mack  truck." 

"I  knew  we  had  something  special  from 
the  beginning  becau.se  we  went  out  there  the 


Cara  Dune  (behind)  and  Sonja  Fritzsche  are  attempting  to  qualify  for  the  1996 
U.S.  Paralympics  tandem  team. 


first  time  and  pumped  it  so  hard.  Sonja  and  1 
just  click,  we  arc  very  similar,"  Dunne  said. 

Dunne  relies  on  Fritzsche  to  be  her  eyes 
on  the  road  and  guide  the  bike,  while 
Fritzsche  relies  on  Dunne  to  help  power  the 
bike  and  be  its  signaling  system. 

The  duo's  long-term  goal  is  to  qualify  for 
the  1996  U.S.  Paralympics  tandem  team,  but 
their  short  term  goal  is  to  be  the  first 
women's  tandem  team  to  ride  across  a  KXX) 
nriile  stretch  of  Siberia  this  summer. 

"We  could  have  gone  to  England  or 
France,  but  we  wanted  to  really  challenge 
ourselves,"  Dunne  said. 

At  this  time,  however,  Dunne  and 
Fritzsche  face  a  more  immediate  obstacle. 
In  order  to  complete  both  the  ride  through 
Siberia  and  make  trips  to  qualifying  events 
for  the  Paralympics,  they  need  sponsors  to 


make  it  all  possible.  This  summer's  ride 
alone  will  cost  $80(X). 

Dunne  and  Fritzsche  rely  on  each  other  to 
keep  pushing  on  harder  and  harder  to  reach 
their  lofty  goals. 

"When  one  of  us  doesn't  feel  like  riding, 
all  the  other  has  to  say  is  '1  can't  ride  with- 
out you,  so  get  moving,'"  Fritzsche  said. 

Dunne  says  the  team's  ^jnentality  is  "grit 
your  teeth  now  and  keep  going  for  a  little 
while  longer,  or  live  with  a  lifetime  of  guilt." 

Dunne  and  Fritzsche  ure  not  rigorously 
preparing  for  upcoming  events  only  for  per- 
sonal reasons. 

"One  of  our  main  goals  is  to  go  out  there 
and  dispel  the  negative  stereotypes  about 
disabled  people  by  setting  an  example. 

"Once  you  start  living  like  I  have,  you 
can't  stop,  it  becomes  the  substance  of  life." 


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SrONSORCO  BV  CAC.  MO.  ilSAC  •  GENEKALADNWR  INFO  ON)  l2VttU 


JCLAINTRAiyiURALFIELO 


32    WedfiMday,  May  24, 1995 


Daily  Bruin  Sports 


Sports 


It's  all  fun  and  games 


By  Melissa  Anderson 

Daily  Bruin  Senior  Staff 

As  serious  as  Jennifer  Brundage  is 
on  the  Softball  field,  it  would 
probably  be  fair  to  conclude  that 
the  All- American  third  baseman  is  just  as 
serious  off  the  field. 

However,  anyone  who  has  spent  time 
with  Brundage  the  practical -Joker  will 
testify  that  it  is  her  tack  of  seriousness 
out  of  uniform  that  makes  her  the  leader 
she  is  come  game  time. 

"Jen  Brundage  keeps  this  team  so 
loose  at  times  that  (co-head  coach) 
Sharon  Backus  sometimes  gets  kind  of 
worried,"  said  UCLA  assistant  coach 
Kelly  Inouye,  who  played  with  Brundage 
from  1992-93.  "She  is  a  leader  in  a  differ- 
ent kind  of  way,  not  only  out  on  the  field. 


AU'American 

Jennifer  Brundage 

is  serious  on  the  field 

but  enjoys  playir^g 

practical  jokes  on 

her  teammates 

to  lighten  the  mood 

off  the  field 


"She  relates  with  the  girls  to  where 
you  would  never  know  she  was  our  three- 
batter,  All-American  with  the  stats  that 
she  has,  because  she  is  a  prankster." 

Brundage  takes  pride  in  her  role  as  the 
team  joker,  and  is  constantly  thinking  of 
new  tricks  to  play  on  her  teammates  on 
road  trips. 

After  defeating  Stanford  in  the  Bay 
Area  earlier  this  year,  Brundage  decided 
that  rather  than  returning  to  the  hotel  to 
study,  she  would  get  some  redemption  on 
Inouye  for  a  prank  she  played  on 
Brundage  her  sophomore  year. 

"Kelly  1.  had  gotten  me  by  putting  a 
cup  of  water  on  the  top  of  the  door  and 
then,  when  I  opened  it,  it  fell  down  on 
me,"  Brundage  said.  "So  that  night  I 

See  BRUNDAGE,  page  29 


UCLA  Spods  Into 

All-Annerican  Jennifer  Brundage  led 

the  nation  in  batting  this  season. 


Constructing  a  dynasty 
the  shadow  of  another 


Just  outside  of  Pauley,  Art  Venegas  has  built  the 
nation's  strongest  collegiate  throwing  program 


By  Scott  Yamaguchi 
and  Tim  Costner 

Daily  Bruin  Senior  Staff 

The  mere  mention  of  the  words  "UCLA' 
and  "dynasty"  undoubtedly  evokes  an 
image  of  the  great  basketball  mystique 
established  by  John 
Wooden  in  the  1960s  and 
1970s. 

After  all,  Wobden's 
teams  won  10  national 
championships  during 
that  time,  a  feat  that  has 
rarely  been  matched  by 
any  program  in  the 
National  Collegiate 
Athletic  Association. 

But  the  banners  that 
hang  in  the  rafters  of 
Pauley  Pavilion  have  cast  a  shadow  over  the 
rest  of  UCLA's  athletic  accomplishments  -  a 


THROWING 


team  titles.  But  if  the  throwers  were  recog- 
nized as  their  owii  entity,  team  championships 
would  be  plentiful. 

*'We  recognized  Art's  talent  several  years 
ago,  and  I  had  tried  to  put  together  a  program 
and  atmosphere  that  would  be  conducive  to 
him  being  able  to  do  as  well  as  possible," 
UCLA  men's  head  coach  Bob  Larsen  said. 
"We  felt  it  was  worth  putting  maximum 
resources  into  the  throwing  program,  so  we 
gave  Art  the  support  he  needed  and  let  him  run 
with  it." 

Since  Venegas  was  hired  as  an  assistant 
coach  in  198 1 ,  his  athletes  have  dominated  the 
collegiate  throwing  circuit  in  much  the  same 
fashion  that  Wooden 's  teams  dominated  bas- 
ketball. 

Venegas  has  coached  his  men  to  at  least  one 
All-American  titJe  in  the  shotput  every  year 
since  1983.  His  women  have  boasted  a  top-S 
NCAA  shot  put  finisher  every  year  since  1989. 

NCAA  individual  championships  have 


shadow  so  long  that  it  extends  north  of  Bruin     gone  to  John  Brenner  in  1984,  Eric  Bergreen 


Art  Venegas  ( 

Champions  in 


SCOTT  0/D«ily  BfuJn 

Standing)  has  coached  24  Ail-Americans  and  seven  NCAA 

the  14  years  that  he  has  served  as  UCLA's  weight  events  cpach. 


Walk  and  onto  the  infield  of  Drake  Stadium, 
where  Art  Venegas  has  quietly  created  a  tradi- 
tion of  his  own. 

Venegas  is  the  men's  and  women's  weight 
events  coach  for  the  UCLA  track  and  field 
program,  which  is  to  say  that  he  coaches  only 
a  part  of  the  UCLA  track  and-field  team.  For 
this  reason,  Venegas  cannot  brag  of  NCAA 


in  1991,  Erik  Smith  in  1993,  and  John  Godina 
in  1994  and  1995. 

For  the  women,  Toni  Lutjens  won  the 
NCAA  in  1986,  Tracie  Millet  in  1990  and 
1991,  and  Dawn  Dumble  in  1992,  1993  and 
1995. 

"I've  been  a  bit  surprised  by  the  consistency 


See  THROWIMQ,  page  28 


Consistent  w.  golf  swings  into  NCAAs 


By  Hye  Kwon 

Daily  Bruin  Staff 

The  stage  is  set  for  the  UCLA 
women's  golf  team. 

For  the  next  three  days,  the 
Bruins  will  battle  the  top  golf 
teams  in  the  nation  at  the  Landfall 
Golf  Club  in  Wilmington,  Del. 

It's  bepn  a  long  journey  for  the 
Bruins,  who  started  the  season 
with  a  victory  at  the  Brighanj 
Young  Invitational  Tournament 
last  September.  Since  then,  the 
Bruins  have  rolled  off  one  other 
tournament  victory,  two  second 
place  finishes  and  nine  top-five 
finishes  in  all. 

The  Bruins  are  currently  ranked 
fifth  in  the  nation.  Although  they 
are  not  considered  the  favorites  to 


win  it  all,  the  Bruins  are  hungry 
for  a  championship  trophy. 

"We  had  a  lot  of  success  during 
the  regular  season,  but  post,sea.son 
is  what  everyone  looks  at,"  head 
coach  Jackie  Tobian-Steinmann 
said.  "Winning  the  national  cham- 
pionship is  the  goal  of  the  team 
and  it's  certainly  my  goal." 

One  source  of  inspiration  for 
this  year's  team  is  the  1991  UCLA 
team  that  brought  the  NCAA 
Champ^ionship  trophy  to 
Westwood  for  the  first  time.  That 
team  had  its  share  of  stars  like 
Lisa  Kiggins,  Debbie  Koyama  and 
LaRee  Sugg,  who  were  each 
named  Ail-Americans  that  year. 
Reflecting  on  the  talent  level  of 
the  '91  team  and  this  year's  team, 
Tobian-Steinmann  feels  good 


about  the  Bruins'  chances  this 
year. 

"Compared  to  m^  '91  team,  I 
think  this  year's  team  is  more  con- 
sistent," Tobian-Steinmann  said. 
"In  fact,  I  think  this  is  the  most 
consistent  team  I  have  seen." 

UCLA  did  not  display  its  best 
performance  in  the  most  recent 
tournament,  however  The  Bruins 
finished  the  NCAA  Western 
Regionals  at  a  somewhat  disap- 
pointing seventh.  They  compiled  a 
three-day  score  of  303-300-306 
which  was  18  strokes  worse  than 
their  score  at  the  PaC'IO 
Championships. 

Tobian-Steinmann  has  guided 
UCLA  to  the  NCAA  tournament 
in  14  of  her  17  years  in  Westwood. 
She  knows  that  the  the  team  needs 


-*^ 


to  drastically  improve  upon  their 
lethargic  performance  at  the 
Western  Regionals. 

"I  think  292  (per  round)  should 
win  the  national  championships," 
Tobian-Steinmann  said.  "If  each 
person  lowers  her  score  by  about 
two  shots,  then  we're  in  the  ball 
park." 

One  element  of  the  Bruins' 
game  that  especially  concerns 
Tobian-Steinmann  is  the  approach 
shot.  Over  the  long  season,  the 
Bruins  have  been  solid  in  almost 
all  facets  of  the  game  but  have 
shown  the  Achilles'  Heel  in  their 
ability  to  hit  the  greens. 

"We've  struggled  from  any- 
where from  50-100  yards," 
Tobian-Steinmann  said.  "We've 
been  stressing  that  at  practice." 


Inside  Sports 


Been  there, 
Dunne  that 

She  was  the  Harvard  class 
president  and  now  she's  a 
UCLA  law  student.  Despite 
her  blindness,  Cara  Dunne  is 
taking  on  tandem  cycling  ... 

See  page  31 

Rodman 

Spurs  forward  Dennis 
Rodman  gave  a  revealing 
intfervicw  to  Sports 
Illustrated  in  New  York ... 

See  page  30 


Unh/er^  of  CalHbmia.  Los  Angeles 


84thYear,No.129 
Circulation:  20,000 


Daily  Bnin 


Thursday 
May  25, 1995 


UC  passes  affirmative  action  resoiution 

Faculty  members 
vote  to  uphold 
existing  policy 


By  Jennifer  K.  Merita 

Dally  Bruin  Staff 

UCLA  faculty  joined  their 
counterparts  at  the  eight  other  UC 
campuses  on  Tuesday  in  endorsing 
a  resolution  in  favor  of  continuing 
affirmative  action  policies  within 
the  UC  system. 

During  the  Academic  Senate's 


last  meeting  of  the  school  year,  its 
task  force  on  affirmative  action 
submitted  a  report  urging  the  pass- 
ing of  a  statewide  resolution 
developed  by  the  systemwide  UC 
Academic  Council.         ^ 

"The  council's  affirmative 
action  committee  developed  this 
resolution  because  it  was  con- 
cerned that  the  faculty  as  a  whole 
present  their  view  about  this  ques- 
tion," said  David  Krogh,  assistant 
to  the  chair  of  the  Academic 
Council.  'The  committee  put  this 
resolution  before  the  leadership  of 
all  the  faculty  of  the  universities." 

UCLA  was  the  last  of  the  cam- 


puses to  endorse  the  resolution. 

"A  majority,  if  not  every  single 
UC  campus,  has  voted  in  favor  of 
this  resolution,"  Krogh  said. 

The  resolution  states  that  'The 
affirmative  action  programs  under- 
taken  by  the  University  ,of 
California  have  made  the  universi- 
ty a  better  institution  by  making  it 
a  more  diverse  institution  in  terms 
of  gender,  racial  and  ethnic  make- 
up of  its  faculty,  students  and  staff. 
TTie  work  is  not  yet  finished." 

UCLA  Chancellor  Charles 
Young  urged  the  faculty  legislative 
body  to  vote  in  favor  of  the  resolu- 
tion. 


"We  are  not  here  just  trying  to 
right  prior  injustices,"  Young  said. 
"We  are  also  trying  to  bring  about 
a  diverse  society  and  environment 
within  the  university  which  con- 
tributes to  the  ...  wealth  and  educa- 
tion of  all  members  of  the 
university  community." 

Although  the  resolution  passed, 
two  voting  faculty  members 
opposed  it. 

'This  is  a  very  complex  issue," 
said  physics  professor  Shechao 
Charles  Feng.  "I  mainly  object  to 
this  umbrella,  very  simplified  ... 
resolution." 

After  researching  undergraduate 


admission  policies,  Feng  said  he 
decided  against  the  resolution. 

"What  I  found  is  very  disturb- 
ing," Feng  told  the  senate. 
"African-American  and  Chicano 
students  are  given  a  boost  of  up  tu 
three  points.  This  constitutes  an 
obviously  racially  based  preferen- 
tial treatment  system." 

However,  the  resolution  encom- 
passes more  than  the  undergradu- 
ate admissions  policies. 

"Several  departments  have 
debated  the  undergraduate  admis- 
sions policy,"  said  Judith  Smith, 

See  RESOLUTION,  page  11 


Rocking  'round  the  clock 


JON  FERREY/Oaity  Brum 

Andy  Lucas,  first-year  English  student,  and  Cynthia  Mosqueda,  first-year  linguistics  student,  rock  in  Westwood  Plaza. 
Students  in  Alpha  Gamma  Omega  are  having  a  36  hour  rock-a-thon  to  benefit  the  American  Cancer  Fund  for  Children. 


Senate  OKs 
waivers  for 
dependents 

Some  say  fee  reduction 
for  children  of  faculty 
needed  for  recruitment 


By  Jennifer  K.  Morita 

Daily  Brum  Staff 

The  Academic  Senat6,  on  Tuesday  after- 
noon, adopted  a  resolution  to  grant  fee 
waivers  for  dependents  of  UC  faculty  -  a 
move  also  taken  by  other  schools  to 
improve  recruitment  and  relerilion  of  fac- 
ulty by  offering  reduced  fees  for  under- 
graduate and  graduate  educations. 

The  resolution,  passed  with  only  two 
objections,  has  several  more  steps  lo  go 
through  before  it  becomes  UC  policy. 
Introduced  by  the  senate's  Faculty  Wcllarc 
Committee,  the  proposal  still  has  to  be 
endorsed  by  the  eight  other  VC  campuses 
and  then  passed  by  the  UC  Regents. 

"The  introduction  of  the  fee  waiver  is 
really  based  on  the  committee's  concern 
for  the  quality  of  future  faculty,"  said  com- 
mittee chair  Mary  Ann  Lewis.  "The  com- 
mittee really  sees  this  resolution  as  an 

See  WAIVER,  page  12 


Inside  News 


'Dem  bones 

The  site  for  the  most 
expansive  human-made 
water  re.serve,  near  Hemet, 
yields  what  may  be  the 
largest  fossil  find  in 
Southem  California. 

See  page  3 


Inside  After  Hours 


Surfin'  the 
Internet 

The  year  of  the  computer 
has  brought  virtually  unlim- 
ited possibilities  to  the  com- 
puter-literate world.  After 
Hours  gives  a  tour  of  some 
of  the  basics. 

See  page  24 


Forum  addresses  civil  riglits  policies 


Panelists  debate 
admissions  system 
merits,  problems 


By  Jennifer  K.  Morita 
and  Jean  Chen 

Daily  Bruin  Staff 

Controversy  and  debate  sur- 
rounded UCLA  during 
Wednesday's  day-long  forum  on 
affirmative 
action  and  the 
Cal  i  forn  i  a 
Civil  Rights 
Initiative, 
spanning  the 
spectrum  of 
perspectives 
on  the  issues. 

"^fponsored 
by  the  UC 
Academic 
Council,  the  purpose  of  the  forum 
was  to  present  different  points  of 
view  on  a  variety  of  issues  that  sur- 


Affirmative 

Action 


round  the  debate  over  affirmative 
action,  according  to  UCLA 
spokesman  Terry  Colvin. 

The  true  meaning  of  civil  rights 
was  examined  by  Los  Angeles 
attorney  J.  Al  Latham.  Latham 
described  a  friend  who  was 
appointed  three  times  to  a  high- 
office  by  two  different  presidents 
and  is  now  a  lawyer  earning  a 
healthy  six-figure  income. 

"She  happens  to  be  Mexican 
American,"  Latham  said.  "When 
her  children  apply  to  college  they 
are  checking  off  that  they  are 
latino  and  by  virtue  of  that  simple 
fact  fhey  are  accorded  enormous 
advantage. 

"It  means  that  these  kids  -  from 
a  most  advantaged  home  -  trump 
the  application  of  a  white  child  . . . 
they  trump  the  application  of  a 
Vietnamese  American,"  Latham 
said. 

"So  if  you're  applying  to  this 
university,  it  makes  an  enormous 
difference  ...  whether  you  can 
check  the  box  Latino,  because 
that's  the  preferred  box.  Or  African 


JUSTIN  WARRtN/Daity  Brum 

Tom  Wood,  co-author  of  the  California  Civil  Rights  Initiative, 
speaks  al  the  UC  Academic  Senate's  affirmative  action  forum. 

American  because  that's  the  pre-  of  Asian  Americans  admitted 

ferred  box.  Is  that  the  civil  rights  would  increase  by  10  percent  - 

drcamT'  I^tham  asked.  Latham  argued  that  admi.ssion  to 

Citing  figures  -  including  UC  the  UC  schools  is  pnmarily  a  func- 

Berkeley's  recent  admission  that  if  ^^ 

race  were  disregMxIcd.  the  number        See  FOWmi»  page  14 


2       Thursday,  May  25, 1995 


Daily  Bruin  News 


Daily  Bruin  News 


Thursday,  May  25, 1995       3 


What's  Brewin'  Today 


California  Community  Foundation 

Third  Annual  Non-Profit  Management 

Workshop 

Omni  Hotel,  Los  Angeles 

Call  (415)  499-7661  for  more  information 

Meals  on  Wheels 

Volunteers  urgently  needed  to  deliver  meals  to 

the  ill,  elderly  and  other  homebound  people  in 

the  Santa  Monica  and  Malibu  areas 

Call  Joanna  Vasquez  at  394-7558  for  more 

information 

Westwind  -  UCLA's  Journal  of  the  Arts 

Free  copies  now  available 
Any  campus  library 
794-4996 


9  a.m.  -  1  p.m. 


Peer  Health  Counselors 

Free  cold  medications,  first  aid,  cappuccino  and 
tea,  low-cost  contraceptives 
Healthy  Body  Shop,  Pauley  Pavilion 
825-5704 


10  a.m. 


Placement  &  Career  Planning  Center 

Career  Exploration  Par  11 
PCPC  Building 
206-1944 


10  a.m.  -  4  p.m. 


Asian  Pacific  Coalition 

"Labor  and  Lace:  Who  Made  Your  Shirt?"  - 

exhibit  detailing  the  garment  industry  and  its 

local  and  global  effects 

Perloff  Quad 

825-7184  V 


Noon  -  4  p.m. 


UCLA  Peer  Health  Counselors 

Free  cold  care  and  first  aid,  low-cost 

contraceptives 

Kcrckhoff40l  ' 

825-8462 


12:15  p.m. 


Student  Focus  Group 

lorum:  "Designing  Family  Preservation  and 
Support  Services  in  the  Los  Angeles  County 
Department  of  Children  and  Family  Services" 
Dodd  Commons 
585-0029 

University  Catholic  Center 

Catholic  rosary  group 
Ackcrman  3516 
208-5015 


^ 


12:30  p.m. 


Center  for  African  American  Studies 

"The  FBI  and  African  Americans  During  World 
War  11:  Roots  of  the  COINTELPRO" 
Haines  158 

825-3776 


1  p.m. 


Department  of  Biostatistics 

Free  statistical  consulting 
Public  Health  A 1-237 
206-6346 

Network  for  Public  Education  &  Social  Justice 

"The  Politics  of  Hate:  On  the  Rise  of  the 
Radical  Right" 
Ackerman  3508 
38-6297 


1:15  p.m. 


John  Paul  II  Society 

"The  Gospel  of  Life:  Culture  of  Life  vs.  Culture 
of  Death" 
Ackerman  2408 
(818)287-9245 


2  p.m. 


SCR  43  Latino  Research  Program 

Terri  de  la  Pcna,  writer  and  novelist 

Haines  152 

825-2365 


4  p.m. 


Flying  Samaritans 

General  meeting  for  a  humanitarian  organization 
that  delivers  health  care  to  Mexican  villages 
Ackerman  2408 
470-2697 


5  p.m. 


Marine  Science  Association 

"Internet  and  Marine  Biology  -  Hands  On" 

Botany  306 

826-4002 


Sportscar  Performance  &  Motoring 

General  meeting 
Ackerman  2408 
209-1164 

UCLA  Student's  Medical  Aid  and  Relief  Team 
(S.M.A.R.T.) 

Red  Cross  meeting  for  paid  internships 

Knudsen  1240B 

824-2135 


6  p.m. 


Amnesty  International 

Speaker  and  discussion  on  human  rights  abuses 
and  environmental  issues  in  Burma 
Ackerman  3508 
794-4566 


6:30  p.m. 


Istitutio  Italiano  di  Cultura 

Free  screening  of  Italian  film  "Fiorile" 

1023HilgardAve. 

443-3250  ext.  106 


7  p.m. 


Campus  Crusade  for  Christ 

The  Edge  -  weekly  meeting 
Factor  Building  A66Q 
824-5591 

College  of  Letters  &  Science  Academic  Support 
Workshops 

Taking  advantage  of  professor  and  TA  office 

hours 

Griffin  Commons  203 

825-9315 

Lesbian/Gay/Bisexual  Rap  . 

Dorm  Rap 

Call  Charles  at  206-3628  for  more  information 

S.M.I.L.E.  (Singaporeans,  Malaysians  in 
Leadership  and  Education) 

General  meeting  _ 

Meet  at  Sproul  turnaround 

794-5757 

UCLA  at  the  Armand  Hammer  Museum  of  Art  & 
Cultural  Center 

Lyie  Ashton  Harris  speaks  on  his  work 
10899  Wilshire  Blvd. 
443-7000      . 

UCLA  Chicano/Latino  Film  and  Television 
Association 

"New  Visions/New  Voices:  Nuevas 
Visiones/Nuevas  Voces" 
Meinitz  Theater 
280-0259 


Ebola  virus  workers 
face  hardship,  hate 


Volunteers  receive 
little  food,  handle 
dead  bodies  daily 


By  Tina  Susman 

The  Assoclatecl  Press 

KIKWIT,  Zaire  —  Each  day, 
medical  student  Sende  Kalume 
gets  up  and  does  a  job  that  has 
made  him  a  pariah  in  his  home 
town.  He  has  been  pelted  with 
rocks,  chased  by  neighbors  and 
merchants  don't  want  to  touch  his 
money. 

He  is  one  of  a  dozen  Red  Cross 
volunteers  handling  the  corpses  of 
Ebola  virus  victims,  from  the  time 
they  die  their  gruesome  deaths 
until  they're  put  in  a  mass  grave 
on  a  weed-covered  hill  on  the 
edge  of  Kikwit.  Ranging  from 
their  20s  to  their  60s,  these  men 
and  women  get  virtually  nothing 
for  their  services  except  two  meals 
a  day,  if  there  is  food. 

"It's  a  sacrifice,  but  it's  a  job 
that  has  a  calling.  It's  a  gift,"  said 
Kalume,  35,  after  returning  from 


dumping  seven  plastic-wrapped 
bodies  into  the  mass  grave.  "We're 
exhausted,  but  ive  can't  just  let  the 
situation  go  on." 

The  World  Health  Organization 
on  Wednesday  said  108  people  in 
Zaire  have  died  of  Ebola  since 
mid- April.  A  total  of  144  people 
have  been  stricken  by  the  disease, 
which  attacks  the  organs  and  tis- 
sues and  causes  most  victims  to 
bleed  to  death.  Most  cases  have 
been  in  Kikwit,  250  miles  east  of 
the  capital  Kinshasa. 

The  body  collectors'  day  begins 
at  7  a.m.,  when  the  group  reports 
to  Kikwit's  hospital,  a  bright  blue 
building  whose  cheery  exterior 
belies  the  horror  inside.  If  there  is 
breakfast  waiting,  they  eat.  Then 
they  leam  which  houses  have  ill  or 
dead  awaiting  transport  to  the  hos- 
pital or  the  morgue. 

An  intensive  educational  cam- 
paign has  taught  Kikwit  residents 
not  to  handle  victims  themselves 
to  avoid  catching  Ebola,  so  they 
call  the  Red  Cross  to  do  the  job. 

By  the  time  the  body  collectors 
are  ready,  they  are  unrecogniz- 

^     See  OUTBREAK,  page  16 


Clarification 


In  the  May  24  issue,  the  story  titled  "Alpha  Partners  change 
ASUCLA  structure,"  included  an  unclear  description.  Robert 
Wise's  position  as  project  coordination  manager  was  eliminated. 
The  Bruin  regrets  any  confusion. 


7:30  p.m. 


Midnight  Special  Bookstore 

Pico  Iyer  reads  and  signs  "Cuba  and  the  Night" 

1318  Third  Street  Promenade,  Santa  Monica 

393-2923 


10  p.m. 


Kappa  Sigma 

Reggae  Sunfest 

Comer  of  Strathmore  and  Levering 

209-0748 

If  your  organization  would  like  an  event  listed  in 
this  section,  please  fill  out  a  listing  request  form' 
in  225  Kerckhoff  by  2  p.m.  the  day  before 
publication.  The  deadline  for  listings  to  appear 
in  Monday's  paper  is  2  p.m.  Thursday.  Please 
address  questions  to  Listings  Editor  Ayako 
Hagihara  at  206-0904. 


Daily 
Bruin 


Voluma  CXXXIV.  Itambtr  12« 
May  2S.  1995 


Editor  in  Chi«f:  Malea  Gold 
Editor  In  Training:  Roxane  Marquez 


Managing  Editor:  Jennifer  Lee 
Newa  Editor:  Tram  Nguyen 

Aaat.  Nawa  Editora:  Gil  Hopenstand, 

Julie  Silva.  Donrui  Wong 

Wire  Editor:  James  Snyder 
Viewpoint  Editor:  Michele  Keller 

Aaat.  Viewpoint  Editor:  Roxane  Marquez 
After  Houra  ^ditor:  Aimed  Wilcox 
A&E  Editor:  Victor  Chen 

Aaat.  A&E  Editora:  Oenise  Cruz. 

Michael  Horowitz.  Robert  Stevens 
Sporta  Editor:  Lawrence  Ma 

Aaat.  Sporta  Editora:  Melissa  Anderson, 

Eric  Branch.  Scott  Yamaguchi 
Senior  Copy  Editor:  Pennie  Collins 

Aaat.  Senior  Copy  Editor:  Laurel  Davis 

Copy  Editora:  Mary-Rose  Abraham, 

Amy  Oauno,  Elizabeth  Escobedo. 

Michele  l-iaydel.  Megan  Kennison, 

Annmane  Liermann,  Negin 

MtrmtrarM.  IRachartee  Snsavaadi.Tncia 

Voehl 
Senior  Production  Editora:  Anna  Andrews. 

Birte  Scholz 
Deaign  Diractor:  Brian  Ng 

Oeaignera:  Kent  Lim,  DanrKxi  Seeley 

Paginatora:  Brenton  Mar,  Frances  Poon 


Art  Director:  Jirro  Oi< 

Aaat.  Art  Dir*ctor:  Amber  Keller 
Art  Staff:  Jerry  Bui.  Susan  Choi,  Tania 
Gonzalez-Ortega.  Melanie  Okamura, 
Peter  Zaslav 

Photography  Editor:  Andrew  Scholar 
Aaat.  Photography  Editors: 
Jonathan  Ferrey.  Audrey  Lee 
Staff  Photographera:  Nicklas  Alters. 
Steve  Kim,  Abby  MosKowitz,  Scott  O,  Amy 
Peng,  Justin  Warren 

Senior  Staff  Writara: 

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Staff  Writars: 

Newa:  Michael  Howerton,  Patrick  Iterkatra, 

Allysaa  Lae,  Kimberty  Mackesy  Jennifer 

Morita,  Rashmi  Nijagal,  Betty  Song 

AAE:  Barbara  IHernandez, 

Lael  Loewenstem.  John  Mangum 

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Chriatian  Schreiber 

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Editor  In  Chief  a  Aaat.:  Wendy  Lee 

Llatinga  Editor:  Ayako  Hagihara 

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308  Wsstwood  Ptaza 

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Newsletter  advises  professionals  with  children 


UCLA  Child  Care . 
Services  addresses 
parental  concerns 

'     ^'  ■       .  ■■  ■    j>.  1  i 

By  Janice  Yen 

For  many  potential  UCLA 
graduates  who  enter  the  job  mar- 
ket with  children,  the  juggling  of 
career  and  family  will  become  a 
daily  routine. 


In  order  to  address  this  balanc- 
ing act,  the  UCLA  Child  Care 
Services  has  created  a  "Working 
Parents  Newsletter"  targeting  pri- 
vate industry  and  business  offices. 
Through  the  newsletter,  UCLA 
wants  to  help  companies  whose 
employees  have  children,  planners 
said. 

Since  its  inception  five  years 
ago,  more  than  350,000  copies  of 
the  newsletter  have  been  pub- 
lished and  distributed. 

The  two-page  newsletter,  pub- 


lished nine  months  each  year  in 
English  and  Spanish,  provides 
working  parents'  information  on 
family  activities,  child  develop- 
ment, health  and  nutrition.  The 
newsletter  draws  on  the  expertise 
of  numerous  UCLA  physicians 
and  academics. 

Past  issues  include  such  topics 
as  helping  children  sleep  through 
the  night,  evaluating  your  child's 
school,  tips  for  starting  a  baby-sit- 
ting co-op  and  dealing  with  child- 
hood allergies. 


Most  of  the  initial  funding  for 
the  newsletter  came  from  various 
community  groups  and  the  UCLA 
Rate  Additive  Funding,  a  division 
of  UCLA  workers'  compensation. 
The  grants  from  these  sources 
helped  launch  the  premier  issue  of 
the  "Working  Parents  Newsletter." 
They  provided  further  support 
with  their  subscriptions  to  the 
newsletter. 

Funding  relies  upon  current 
subscribers,  which  includes  Price- 
Waterhouse      LLP,      RAND 


Corporation,  J.  Paul  Getty  Trust, 
child  care  centers,  resource  and 
referral  agencies,  small  businesses 
and  UCLA  departments. 

The  newsletter  provides 
employers  with  an  easy  and  inex- 
pensive option  to  show  support  for 
'its  working  parents  -  especially  if 
the  company  doesn't  offer  day 
care  or  other  child  services,  edi- 
tors said. 

"The  balancing  act  all  working 

•     See  NEWSLETTER,  page  17 


New  California 

reservoir  site  of 

fossil  dig 


Paleontological 
remains  may  be 
largest  in  state 

By  Philip  Iglauer 

Mastodons,  camels  and  bison 
walked  the  earth  of  the 
Domenigoni  Valley  near  Hemet, 
Calif.  After  thousands  of  years, 
these  once  furry,  now  fossilized, 
former  Southland  residents  have 
become  the  subject  of  a  milestone 
paleontologic  dig. 

The  work  is  headed  by 
Kathleen  Springer,  curator  of  the 
San  Bernardino  Cpunty  Museum, 
and  assisted  by  Eric  Scott,  a 
UCLA  masters  graduate  in  the 
field  of  biological  anthropology. 

The  Metropolitan  Water 
District's  recent  plans  to  consuuct 


the  largest  human-made  water 
reserve  in  California  history  ush- 
ered in  their  needed  expertise 
because  the  project  rests  on  what 
may  be  the  largest  fossil  remains 
in  Southern  California.  The  site 
being  excavated  may  contain  fos- 
sils that  date  back  to  the  last  great 
ice  age,  known  as  the  Pleistocene 
epoch,  that  occurred  some  1.8 
million  years  ago. 

Scientists  said  the  site  repre- 
sents a  fascinating  discovery  for 
researchers  because  of  parallels 
found  between  the  Domenigoni 
Valley  fauna  and  the  fauna  in  the 
L.A.  basin  La  Brea  Tarpits,  Scott 
said. 

The  Metropolitan  Water 
District  broke  ground  Wedne.sday 
on  the  $1.9  billion  reservoir, 
called  the  Domenigoni  Valley 
Reservoir  Project.  When  it  is 

'  See  FOSSILS,  page  17 


A  water  reserve  site  yielded  what  may  be  the  largest  fossil 
remains  in  Southern  California.  The  dig  Is  headed  by 
Kathleen  Springer,  right,  and  UCLA  masters  grad  Eric  Scott. 


AIDS,  Ebola  could  warn  of  other  mutating  viruses 


Genetic  change 
may  render  viruses 
deadly,  says  expert 


By  Paul  Recer 

The  Associated  Press 

WASHINGTON  —  HIV  and 
Ebola  may  be  just  cautionary 
warnings  of  many  other  killer 
viruses  that  could  suddenly  flash 
through  the  human  population  as  a 
result  of  genetic  mutation  or  social 
changes  that  favor  the  disease. 


experts  say. 

Viruses,  living  in  humans  or  in 
the  animal  kingdom,  are  oppor- 
tunists that  under  the  right  condi- 
tions can  quickly  start  preying  on 
hosts  that  previously  were 
immune,  virus  researchers  said 
Monday  at  a  meeting  of  the 
American  Society  of 

Microbiology.  They  said  the  only 
protection  is  constant  medical  vig- 
ilance. 

Viruses  such  as  HIV,  which 
causes  AIDS,  and  Ebola  may  have 
existed  for  decades  in  nature,  in 
one  form  or  another,  but  then 
became  human  killers  only  after 


some  genetic  change,  or  some  new 
route  of  exposure  created  a  dis- 
ease path  they  could  exploit,  said 
Stephen  Morse  of  Rockefeller 
University. 

"We  probably  are  seeing  only 
the  tip  of  the  iceberg  in  the  num- 
ber of  viruses  that  can  exist  in 
humans,"  said  Morse,  an  expert  on 
Ebola.  "We  need  to  be  vigilant  so 
we  can  respond  quickly." 

AIDS  and  Ebola,  he  said, 
"should  be  regarded  as  cautionary 
tales  for  the  pathways  by  which  a 
virus  can  move  into  a  larger  popu- 
lation." 

Richard        Courtney        of 


Pennsylvania  State  University  said 
the  recent  pattern  is  that  "emerg- 
ing viral  diseases  are  becoming 
more  frequent,  not  less." 

Ebola,  which  has  broken  out  in 
21aire  and  has  killed  more  than  100 
people,  may  have  become  epidem- 
ic after  a  breakdown  in  routine 
medical  precautions  at  an  African 
hospital,  Morse  said.  A  shortage 
of  syringes  in  the  hospital  may 
have  caused  the  vims  to  be  spread 
from  one  patienfto  ariother  when 
needles  were  improperly  cleaned 
and  reused,  he  said. 

Medical  workers  also  may  not 
have  worn  gloves  or  other  barrier 

— r% 4^*= 


protection  while  treating  Ebola 
patients  and  either  contracted  the 
virus  or  carried  it  to  other  patients, 
he  said. 

Some  experts  believe  Ebola  is 
present  somewhere  in  the  African 
•wilderness  and  becomes  a  wide- 
spread human  problem  only  when 
a  person  catches  i^  in  the  wild  and 
takes  it  to  other  people  in  towns  or 
cities. 

The  exact  source  of  the  AIDS 
virus  is  not  known,  but  it,  too,  may 
have  existed  in  remote  areas  for 
years  before  it  was  spread  widely 

~"  See  VmUS,  page  18 


4      Thursday,  May  25, 1995 


Daily  Bruin  Hmm 


orld 


Israel  and  Syria 
make  a0reeineiit 

WASHINGTON  —  Secretary  of  State 
Warren  Christopher  announced 
Wednesday  Israel  and  Syria  have  agreed 
on  a  framework  for  security  arrangements 
on  the  disputed  Golan  Heights  and  said 
he  would  go  to  the  Middle  East  next 
month  to  try  to  close  the  "significant 
gaps"  that  reniain. 

"This  is  an  important  development." 
Christopher  said  in  a  statement.  His 
spokesman  gave  no  details  of  the  under- 
standing that  emerged  from  months  of 
U.S.  mediation  and  visits  to.Washington 
by  Israeli  Prime  Minister  Yitzhak  Rabin 
and  Syrian  Foreign  Minister  Farouk  al- 
Sharaa. 

Mexi^in  fed  agents 
face  prosecution 

SAN  DIFGO  —  Two  Mexican  federal 
police  agents  accused  of  chasing  a  carload 
of  American  tourists  to  the  San  Ysidro 
border  crossing  have  been  returned  to 
Mexico  to  face  prosecution. 

The  officers  and  two  accomplices 
allegedly  used  weapons  to  pursue  U.S. 
tourists  through  traffic  at  the  San  Ysidro 
Port  of  Entry  and  forced  them  back  into 
Mexico. 

The  chase  ended  when  they  were  chal- 
lenged by  U.S.  Customs  inspectors,  who 
drew  their  guns  in  front  of  the  stunned 
motorists  in  the  Sunday  confrontation. 

The  federal  officers  had  been  involved 
in  a  minor  traffic  dispute  in  Tijuana  with 
the  group  of  six  young  Americans  before 
the  chase  began,  police  said.  They  face 
potential  charges  of  abuse  of  authority, 
attempted  kidnapping  and  drugs  and 
weapons  violations. 


Arrests  increase  as 
anniversary  nears 

BEIJING  —  Police  have  arrested  a  labor 
activist  and  a  scientist,  raising  to  14  the 
number  of  dissidents  detained  rn  the  past 
week  as  the  anniversary  of  the  1989 
crackdown  on  the  Tianann[)en  Square 
protests  approaches. 

Most  of  those  detained  have  petitioned 
the  government  recently  for  greater  toler- 
ance and  for  the  release  of  pro-democra- 
cy activists  still  imprisoned  six  years 
later. 

Sha  Yuguang,  a  45-year-old  veteran 
labor  and  human  rights  activist,  was 
taken  from  his  home  Tuesday  evening. 
Bao  Zunxin,  a  former  researcher  at  the 
government's  Chinese  Academy  of  Social 
Sciences,  was  taken  in  for  questioning 
but  released  three  hours  later.  Human 
Rights  in  China  reported  today. 

Human  remains 
found  in  Vietnam 

HANOI,  Vietnam  —  Investigators  have 
found  several  human  remains  they  think 
are  those  of  American  servicemen  miss- 
ing in  action  from  the  Vietnam  War,  a 
U.S.  official  said  Wednesday. 

Villagers  handed  over  some  of  the 
remains,  and  teams  of  American  and 
Vietnamese  specialists  dug  others  from 
aircraft  crash  sites  in  a  search  that  ended 
Tuesday,  said  Gary  Flanagan,  deputy 
commander  of  the  U.S.  MIA  office  in 
Hanoi.  He  did  not  say  exactly  how  many 
remains  weXe  uncovered. President 
Clinton  has  said  Vietnam  must  do  more  to 
help  resolve  the  fates  of  MIAs  before 
relations  can  be  fully  normalized.  U.S. 
officials  have  commended  the 
Vietnamese  for  their  cooperation. 


Detective  testifies 
in  Whitewater  trial 

_ WASHINGTON  —  Whitewater  prosecu- 
tors are  assembling  evidence  before  a 
federal  grand  jury  about  White  House 
resistance  to  an  investigation  of  Vincent 
Foster's  death,  sources  familiar  with  the 
proceedings  say. 

U.S.  Park  Police  detective  Pete 
Markland  testified  for  an  hour  Tuesday 
about  how  White  House  lawyers  rebuffed 
his  efforts  to  search  Foster's  White  House 
office  in  the  days  after  the  deputy  White 
House  counsel's  body  was  found  in  a 
Northern  Virginia  park  on  July  20,  1993, 
the  sources  said. 

Also  testifying  was  a  Secret  Service 
inspector,  Dennis  Martin,  who  was  with 
Markland  at  the  White  House  as  the  Park 
Police  detective  tried  to  investigate 
Foster's  death. 

White  House 
intruder  charged 

WASHINGTON  —  The  government  filed 
assault  and  firearms  charges  Wednesday 
against  a  37-year-old  graduate  student 
who  was  shot  on  the  White  House  lawn 
after  scaling  a  fence  with  an  unloaded 
gun.  Prosecutors  suggested  a  history  of 
mental  problems. 

Leland  WilJiam'Modjeski,  captured 
less  than  50  yards  from  the  executive 
mansion,  was  not  accu.sed  of  trying  to 
harm  President  Clinton.  Police  suggested 
it  was  more  likely  Modjeski  wanted  to 
hurt  him.self. 

Prosecutors  charged  Modjeski  with 
felony  counts  of  forcibly  assaulting  a  fed- 
eral officer  and  interstate  transportation 
of  a  firearm  with  intent  to  commit  a 
felony. 


CItyWalk  suspect 
pleads  innocent 

BEVERLY  HILLS  —A  woman  found  on 
a  freeway  with  seemingly  self-inflicted 
stab  wounds  pleaded  innocent  to  slashing 
to  death  the  mother  and  ex -girl  friend  of 
her  lover  at  City  Walk  on  Mother's  Day. 

Donna  Lee,  44,  was  arraigned  Tuesday 
in  Beverly  Hills  Municipal  Court  on  two 
counts  of  murder  and  special  circum- 
stance allegations  of  multiple  murder.  If 
convicted,  she  could  face  the  death  penal- 
ty- 
Lee,  of  North  Hollywood,  was  arrested 

Friday  -  a  day  after  her  lover,  Paul  Carasi 
was  also  arrested  for  investigation  of  the 
murders. 

Carasi,  30,  who  lived  with  Lee  just  two 
doors  from  the  victims,  was  released 
Monday  from  the  Los  Angeles  County 
Men's  Central  Jail. 

Police  chief  faces 
disciplinary  action 

The  Police  Commission  reprimanded 
Chief  Willie  Williams  for  allegedly 
accepting  free  accommodations  at  a  Las 
Vegas  hotel,  the  Los  Angeles  Times 
reported  today. 

The  disciplinary  action  will  become 
part  of  Williams'  personnel  file,  but  he 
will  not  be  suspended  or  financially 
penalized,  the  Times  reported,  citing 
unidentified  .sources  and  internal  police 
documents. 

In  the  past  Williams  has  said  he  com- 
mitted no  wrongdoing 

His  lawyer,  Mclanie  Lomax,  said  she 
was  preparing  to  sue  the  commission  on 
Williams'  behalf. 

Compiled  from  Bruin  wire  services 


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6      Thursday,  May  25, 1995 


Daily  Bruin  News 


Licensing  lx>ard  investigates  doctors  at  UCi  ciinic 


The  Associated  Press 

ORANGE  —  State  licensing 
authorities  have  opened  an  inves- 
tigation into  three  doctors  at  a 
fertility  clinic  run  by  UC  Irvine, 
said  a  spokeswoman  far  the 
Medical  Board  of  California. 

The  board  usually  does  not 
confirm  that  investigations  are 
under  way,  but  made  an  excep- 
tion because  of  public  concern 


about  the  case,  said  Candice 
Cohen.  She  said  board  investiga- 
tors were  also  cooperating  with 
the  Orange  County  district  attor- 
ney's office,  but  declined  to  give 
details. 

Officials  from  the  university 
and  the  National  Institutes  of 
Health  have  been  looking  into 
allegations  of  financial  and 
research  irregularities  at  the 
Center  for  Reproductive  Health, 


run  by  doctors  Ricardo  Asch, 
Jose  Balmaceda  and  Sergio  Stone 
at  the  UCI  Medical  Center  here. 

The  university  sued  the  doc- 
tors last  week,  alleging  they  did- 
n't  get  proper  approval  for 
research  on  humans.  The  univer- 
sity asked  a  judge  to  safeguard 
documents. 

The  school  claimed  Asch 
recently  tried  to  get  a  woman  to 
sign  a  consent  form  for  a  proce- 


dure he  did  two  years  ago  in  an 
attempt  to  falsify  records. 

The  Orange  County  Register, 
citing  records  and  interviews, 
reported  last  week  that  Asch  took 
eggs  from  a  woman  in  1991,  fer- 
tilized them,  and  placed  them  to 
another  woman.  The  recipient 
later  gave  birth,  but  her  husband 
said  the  baby  was  not  a  result  of 
that  procedure,  the  Register 
reported  Monday. 


All  the  doctors  have  denied 
doing  anything  wrong.  Asch 
announced  during  the  weekend 
he  was  quitting  the  university. 
The  school,  meanwhile, 
announced  the  doctors  were  on 
paid  suspension. 

"The  university  has  singled  out 
at  least  our  client  and  it  has  taken 
on  the  characteristics  of  a  witch- 
hunt," said  Diane  Wyzga,  attor- 
ney for  Balmaceda. 


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Thursday,  May  25, 1995       7 


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8      Thursday,  May  25, 1995 


Daily  Bruin  News 


Daily  Bruin  News 


Thursday,  May  25, 1995       9 


Clearing,  reflection  follow  building's  demolition 


By  Christopher  Sullivan 

The  Associated  Press 

OKLAHOMA  CITY  —  Evan 
Churchwell  had  shot  nine  hours  of 
videotape:  the  chaos  after  the  fed- 
eral building  bombing,  then  the 
memorial  services  and  the  rescue 
work.  Now  he  had  the  final  chap- 
ter. 

**My  kids'll  be  talking  about 
this  someday  in  school.  It'll  be  in 


the  history  books,"  he  said, 
rewinding  his  camcorder  to  watch 
the  dynamited  nine-story  building 
come  down  once  again.  "You'll  go 
back  to  it." 

Visitors  went  back  to  it  Tuesday 
evening,  milling  quietly  past  the 
imploded  structure's  jumbled  con- 
crete megaliths.  A  father  stopping 
at  a  chain-link  barrier  whispered 
simply  to  his  young  son,  "It's 
gone." 


If  the  site  of  the  April  19  blast 
becomes  a  memorial,  as  many 
have  suggested,  survivors  and  vic- 
tims' relatives  should  help  design 
it,  said  Gov.  Frank  Keating. 

"Families,  as  people  who  have 
suffered  the  most  at  the  hands  of 
this  act  of  terrorism,  should  have  a 
role.  Their  suggestions  should  be 
listened  to,"  he  said. 

The  government's  General 
Services  Administration  controls 


the  property  and  has  not 
announced  plans  for  it.  For  now, 
the  site  is  to  be  cleared  and  cov- 
ered with  sod. 

As  the  rubble  is  removed,  work- 
ers will  search  an  area  marked 
with  orange  paint  and  netting  for 
the  last  missing  human  remains. 
Technicians  placed  a  black  tarpau- 
lin over  the  area,  Keating  said, 
estimating  it  could  take  up  to  six 
days  to  reach  the  remains. 


The  bodies  of  credit  union 
employees  Christy  Rosas,  22,  and 
Virginia  Thompson,  56,  remain 
entombed  in  the  rubble.  The 
search  for  them  was  called  off 
May  4  when  the  building  became 
too  dangerous  for  rescue  workers. 

Police  believe  a  third  person, 
54-year-old  Alvin  Justes,  may  also 
be  there.  He  frequented  the  credit 

See  BOMBING,  page  19 


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10    Thursday,  May  25, 1995 


Daily  Bruin  Newvs 


Daily  Bruin  News 


Thursday,  May  25, 1995    U 


WWII  vets  honored,  others  look  for  recognition 


By  Philip  Iglauer 

Earlier  this  month,  individuals 
and  governments  all  over  the 
Southland  commemorated  Victory 
in  Europe,  a  time  for  the  remem- 
brance of  allied  perseverance. 

While  those  who  served  were 
honored,  scores  of  veterans  of  sub- 
sequent wars  were  left  unrecog- 
nized. 

V-E  Day  commemordtes  the  sac- 


rifice of  millions  of  women  and 
men  whose  lives  were  altered  by  the 
devastation  that  is  a  part  of  all  wars 
pa.st  and  present. 

Some  say  it  is  a  cold  irony  the 
Vietnam  War  officially  ended  on 
May  5,  more  than  20  years  ago. 

For  many  Angelenos,  World  War 
II  is  remembered  with  less  moral 
ambiguity  than  other  U.S.  engage- 
ments. 

"There  is  a  sense  that  World  War 


II  was  a  just  war,"  said  Gerald 
Margolis,  director  of  the  Museum 
of  Tolerance. 

About  900,000  veterans  reside  in 
Southern  California  and  roughly 
237,000  Vieuiam  War  veterans  live 
in  Los  Angeles  County.  There  are 
approximately  300  veterans  and 
200  dependents  of  veterans  that  are 
students  at  UCLA. 

Though  many  veterans  are  able 
to  assimilate  into  civilian  life,  some 


have  greater  difficulty.  About  20 
percent  of  the  homeless  in  L.A.  are 
veterans,  counselors  said. 

The  West  Los  Angeles  Vet 
Center,  founded  in  1978,  was  one  of 
the  first  clinics  to  specialize  in 
"readjustment  counseling"  for 
Vietnam  veterans  suffering  from 
post-traumatic  stress  disorder. 

"A  lot  of  vets  are  thinldng,  'one 
day  I  will  get  ovgr  this,'"  said  Jerry 
Melnyk,  director  of  the  center,  "if  I 


find  the  right  kind  of  medication, 
the  right  woman,  if  I  drink  enou^ 
alcohol,  I  can  get  over  this."' 

It  was  not  until  the  1960s  and 
'70s  that  post-traumatic  stress  dis- 
order was  recognized  by  Vietnam 
vets  who  became  psychologists. 
These  people  were  among  the  first 
to  notice  behavioral  patterns  associ- 
ated with  the  di.sorder. 

See  VETERANS,  page  11 


VETERANS 

From  page  10 

"Some  of  the  vets  who  went  into 
psychology  noticed  (Vietnam  vets) 
were  all  talking  about  the  same 
problems  that  every  veteran  suffers 
from.  The  American  Psychological 
Association  resisted  the  theory,  and 
after  a  lot  -of  debate,  it  finally 
became'recognized,"  Melnyk  said. 

For  Vietnam  veterans,  V-E  Day 
serves  as  a  reminder  of  how  they 
were  raised,  their  expectations  of 
how  they  were  to  serve  and  how 


they  would  be  treated  when  they 
returned  from  service,  he  said. 

"So  they  have  mixed  emotions," 
Melnyk  added.  "They're  happy  for 
the  World  War  II  vets  who  are  com- 
memorated, but  it's  sort  of  bitter- 
sweet, because  it's  a  reminder  of 
how  they're  not  treated.  They're 
thinking,  though  we  didn't  win,  we 
still  committed  and  risked  our  lives 
and  sacrificed  so  much  of  our- 
selves." 

After  committing  years  in  ser-. 
vice  to  their  counu^,  many  vets  feel 
.society  is  obligated  to  support  them 
in  getting  on  with  their  lives. 


"We  fought  for  our  country 
because  we  believed  in  our  govern- 
ment and  democracy,"  said  Steve 
Rosmarin,  a  World  War  II  and 
Korean  War  veteran. 

Rosmarin,  now  the  Hollywood 
post  commander  of  the  Jewi.sh  War 
Veterans  of  the  USA,  supports  U.S.